logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
Yann Martel
Winner of the 2002 Man Booker Prize for FictionYann Martel, the son of diplomats, was born in Spain in 1963. He grew up in Costa Rica, France, Mexico, Alaska, and Canada and as an adult has spent time in Iran, Turkey, and India. After studying philosophy in college, he worked at various odd jobs... show more



Winner of the 2002 Man Booker Prize for FictionYann Martel, the son of diplomats, was born in Spain in 1963. He grew up in Costa Rica, France, Mexico, Alaska, and Canada and as an adult has spent time in Iran, Turkey, and India. After studying philosophy in college, he worked at various odd jobs until he began earning his living as a writer at the age of twenty-seven. He lives in Montreal.

show less
Birth date: June 25, 1963
Yann Martel's Books
Recently added on shelves
Yann Martel's readers
Share this Author
Community Reviews
The better to see you, my dear
The better to see you, my dear rated it 2 years ago
Defiantly funny in the face of total devastation, but more than that, ever hopeful. I guess that last is the best part of strong faith. The important part. Inner piece and enduring hope. Here's the deal: I'm an agnostic. We get roasted inside *grin*. I could go a long while about the difference be...
Linda78
Linda78 rated it 2 years ago
DNF @ 20%. This is nothing but lectures on zoology, Hinduism and Christianity. Not that this stuff isn't interesting, but a book with a good story it does not make. The weird interjections of the guy talking about some other guy are, well, weird. Frankly, this book sounds like it wants to be mega su...
Burfobookalicious
Burfobookalicious rated it 2 years ago
'Life of Pi' made the World Book Night list for 2011 and rightly so. Martel has created a modern masterpiece, which is beautifully written. The storyline is unusual and all the more absorbing for it. The ending too is intriguing and though the movie interpretation is good, it can't do full justice t...
Thewanderingjew
Thewanderingjew rated it 3 years ago
This is not an easy book to read. It feels almost as if it is set in a world of make-believe, and perhaps it is. When it begins, we meet a young man, Tomás, who walks backwards to deal with his grief from the sudden deaths of his lover Dora, a servant in his uncle’s house, their child Gaspar, and hi...
Memories From Books on Booklikes
Memories From Books on Booklikes rated it 3 years ago
All through The High Mountains of Portugal by Yann Martel, I feel as if there exists a metaphorical, philosophical meaning behind the words. All through the book, it remains beyond my grasp. Having finished it, I wish someone could explain it me. I wish for that "a-ha" moment to have it all make sen...
see community reviews
Need help?