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Alan Rodgers
Born August 11, 1959 in Montclair, NJ Died March 8, 2014 in Anaheim, CARodgers was a science fiction and horror writer, editor and poet.In the early eighties he was Associate Editor for Rod Serling's Twilight Zone Magazine(1984-1987). Soon after he initiated another project as the Editor of... show more

Born August 11, 1959 in Montclair, NJ Died March 8, 2014 in Anaheim, CARodgers was a science fiction and horror writer, editor and poet.In the early eighties he was Associate Editor for Rod Serling's Twilight Zone Magazine(1984-1987). Soon after he initiated another project as the Editor of the spin-off horror digest Night Cry(1985-1987). His stories have been published in a number of venues including Weird Tales, Twilight Zone and a number of anthologies such as Darker Masques, Prom Night and Vengeance Fantastic.He began publishing fantasy with Bram Stoker Award for Best Long Form Fiction winner and World Fantasy Award nominee the novelette "The Boy Who Came Back From the Dead"(1987). His debut horror novel "Blood of the Children"(1989) was a Bram Stoker Award nominee for Best First Horror Novel. Other novels to follow were "Fire"(1990), "Night"(1991), "Pandora"(1995), Stoker Award nominee "Bone Music"(1995), "The Bear Who Found Christmas"(2000) and "Her Misbegotten Son"(2000).Rodgers is also known for such works as "Alien Love", "The River of Our Destiny", "Angel of Our Mercy" and "Light"There were two collections of his fiction, "New Life For the Dead"(1992) and "Ghosts Who Cannot Sleep"(2000).He is survived by his three children, Andrea, Alexandra and Abram and his three siblings, Jyaphia, Laurie and Scott as well as his long term romantic interest fiction author Amy Sterling Casil.
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Community Reviews
Randolph "Dilda" Carter
Randolph "Dilda" Carter rated it 4 years ago
This collection knocked around since the '90s with several publishers, starting with Arkham House, giving up on it. Cemetery Dance brought it out ultimately. It had been so long in the tennis court that Lansdale couldn't find his original introduction and had to write a new one! The collection i...
Miss Clark
Miss Clark rated it 5 years ago
As it is with so many anthologies, there is good, enjoyable, bad and those oh-so-special "Where is the bleach so I can get this story out of my mind?" stories. This was an "adult" fairytale anthology and it most certainly is not all about the HEA ending. Most of them are dark and depressing, with an...
Books etc.
Books etc. rated it 5 years ago
The stories are better than those collected in the similarly themed My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me: Forty New Fairy Tales , it has more edge and overall there's this grey and dark tone surrounding it. which leads me to say that the title doesn't fit it at all. Nor the cover. Probably b...
Danielle's Reading Adventures
Danielle's Reading Adventures rated it 6 years ago
Overall, I found this anthology disappointing. The ratio of stories I didn't like or was indifferent about was higher than the ones I liked or loved. I really, really hated the Peter Straub story. I don't usually have that severe a negative reaction to stories/books, but this is one of them. On th...
Chris' Fish Place
Chris' Fish Place rated it 9 years ago
Includes several good stories. The best one being "True Love", a tale about Prince Charming and his brides.
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