logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: African-Americans
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
review 2017-02-13 03:47
Almost to Freedom
Almost to Freedom - Vaunda Micheaux Nelson,Colin Bootman

Almost to Freedom by Vaunda Nelson is an amazing, inspirational fictional book told through a rag doll's perspective. The rag doll's name is Sally and she is telling the story of a young girl and her family as they escape from slavery and start a new journey called the Underground Railroad, which to them, is a way to freedom. The young girl who owns Sally builds a friendship with her and takes her every where she goes, until one night in a safe house, Sally accidently gets left behind. Throughout this story, the reader sees how powerful freedom is. Even though this is a fictional book, it does have some truth behind the words. I would read this to second grade through fourth grade. I would read this book during Black History Month so my students will understand the meaning behind this special holiday.

 

Lexile Level: 530L

 

 

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2016-11-13 05:19
THE ODYSSEY OF THE AFRICAN AMERICAN IN THE U.S. MILITARY
The Right to Fight: A History of African Americans in the Military - Gerald Astor

This is a fairly comprehensive book - replete with photos and personal accounts - of the history of African Americans in the U.S. military spanning from the War of Independence to Vietnam. The author also looks into the efforts made by the military in the post-Vietnam era to expand opportunities for advancement in the military for African Americans.

I recommend "THE RIGHT TO FIGHT: A History of African Americans in the Military" to any reader keen to know and better understand an aspect of U.S. history too often overlooked or marginalized.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2015-05-01 00:35
EUGENE BULLARD - THE FIRST BLACK EAGLE & UNSUNG AMERICAN HERO
Eugene Bullard: World's First Black Fighter Pilot - Larry Greenly

This is a concise story about a most remarkable African American --- Eugene Bullard (1895-1961). who --- despite all the obstacles set against him at a time when overt discrimination against African Americans and other people of color was legally sanctioned and condoned in most social quarters in the U.S. --- managed to travel to Europe in 1911 in search of a better life. Three years later, with the outbreak of World War I, Bullard offered his services to the French Foreign Legion, where he fought for 2 years, distinguishing himself in battle and being seriously wounded. After he recovered, Bullard was able to transfer to the French Aéronautique Militaire, where he trained as a fighter pilot, winning his wings on May 5, 1917.

Bullard's time at the Front as a combat pilot would last but a few months. Despite his commendations for valor by the French government and his proven ability as a pilot, Bullard was rejected for service in the U.S. Army Air Service when he had applied for a transfer there. (The U.S. military had no interest in having African American combat pilots.)

The book goes on to outline Bullard's postwar life in Paris (where he ran a number of businesses and jazz clubs), the intelligence work he performed for his adopted country shortly before the Second World War, and his later life back in America, where he was largely forgotten until shortly before his death when he was interviewed on a nationally popular TV show.

The greatest value of "Eugene Bullard" is its inspirational value. For here was a man who defied the odds many times, and won.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2015-04-01 04:28
A TRIBUTE TO THE "BUFFALO DIVISION" OF WORLD WAR II WHO SUCCESSFULLY BATTLED JIM CROW RACISM & THE AXIS POWERS IN ITALY
Black Warriors: The Buffalo Soldiers of World War II: Memories of the Only Negro Infantry Division to Fight in Europe - Ivan J. Houston

The author of this book, Ivan J. Houston, a native of Los Angeles, CA, was a student at the University of California - Berkeley, when he was called to active duty in January 1944. He had hoped to become a combat pilot, but was instead routed to infantry training at Fort Benning, GA. Subsequently, Houston was assigned to the 3rd Battalion of the 370th Regimental Combat Team of the 92nd Division, with whom he would serve for the remainder of his service with the U.S. Army. The 92nd Division fought alongside the 442nd Infantry Regiment (Japanese American) as well as various British, South African, British Empire and Commonwealth forces, and the Brazilian Expeditionary Force (which was attached to the U.S. 5th Army).

This book serves as both a testimonial to Ivan Houston's Army service (he also sheds some light on his life postwar) and the combat actions and achievements of the 92nd Infantry Division during the Second World War. There are also a number of maps in "Black Warriors" that allows the reader to trace the movements made by the 92nd Division from its introduction to combat in August 1944 along the Arno River to the end of the war in May 1945.

One particular passage in the book that has personal resonance for me was the special ceremony on June 6th, 1945 in which one of the units of the 92nd Division was given "the honor of escorting the ashes of Christopher Columbus back to Genoa from where they had been hidden by the partisans during the war. The men of Company H of the 370th Infantry Regiment accompanied the ornamental urn, which rested on a horse-drawn carriage, into the Piazza della Vittoria, largest square in Genoa." Company H was commanded by my uncle, who was a captain at the time and "regarded as one of the regiment's outstanding leaders." I confess to being filled with pride as I read those words.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2015-03-05 14:37
A TRIBUTE TO THE "BUFFALO DIVISION" OF WORLD WAR II WHO SUCCESSFULLY BATTLED JIM CROW RACISM & THE AXIS POWERS IN ITALY
Black Warriors - Ivan J. Houston, With Gordon Cohn

The author of this book, Ivan J. Houston, a native of Los Angeles, CA, was a student at the University of California - Berkeley, when he was called to active duty in January 1944. He had hoped to become a combat pilot, but was instead routed to infantry training at Fort Benning, GA. Subsequently, Houston was assigned to the 3rd Battalion of the 370th Regimental Combat Team of the 92nd Division, with whom he would serve for the remainder of his service with the U.S. Army. The 92nd Division fought alongside the 442nd Infantry Regiment (Japanese American) as well as various British, South African, British Empire and Commonwealth forces, and the Brazilian Expeditionary Force (which was attached to the U.S. 5th Army).

This book serves as both a testimonial to Ivan Houston's Army service (he also sheds some light on his life postwar) and the combat actions and achievements of the 92nd Infantry Division during the Second World War. There are also a number of maps in "Black Warriors" that allows the reader to trace the movements made by the 92nd Division from its introduction to combat in August 1944 along the Arno River to the end of the war in May 1945.

One particular passage in the book that has personal resonance for me was the special ceremony on June 6th, 1945 in which one of the units of the 92nd Division was given "the honor of escorting the ashes of Christopher Columbus back to Genoa from where they had been hidden by the partisans during the war. The men of Company H of the 370th Infantry Regiment accompanied the ornamental urn, which rested on a horse-drawn carriage, into the Piazza della Vittoria, largest square in Genoa." Company H was commanded by my uncle, who was a captain at the time and "regarded as one of the regiment's outstanding leaders." I confess to being filled with pride as I read those words.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?