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review 2018-09-01 07:26
Anger Is a Gift
Anger Is a Gift - Mark Oshiro

Warnings: Institutionalized racism, racism, policy brutality, police shootings, death 

 

I'm going to steal this line from Elena, because it perfectly sums up how I feel about this book:

"The more potential a book shows the less I’m inclined to be generous when it doesn’t live up to it." 

Not that this book didn't always live up to its potential. I think it met that potential and messed it in equal measure.

 

I've followed Mark Does Stuff off and on over the years, and discovered a lot of great shows and books I otherwise wouldn't have tried because of him. I often find his commentary interesting, insightful and funny. I don't always agree with him and the conclusions he makes, but he always explains those conclusions in ways I can understand and respect.

 

Still, I was hesitant to read this book. I was concerned that knowing so much about the author might impact the way I read this book, and I did keep picking out things he'd mentioned about himself or his life experiences being reflected in the characters and the plot, which was distracting to say the least. More than that though, given some of the things I've disagreed with him about over the years, I was worried this wouldn't be for me. And perhaps, in the end, it isn't. So I went into this with certain expectations I wouldn't have had if there was just any other author, and I honestly can't say how much of that influenced my reading.

 

There was a lot here to like, and a lot to not like. After thinking over this review for the last few days (more like a week-and-half as I'm editing this review yet again), I'm still not sure how to write one. So I'm doing a list!

 

 

Some positives:

~Moss's relationship with his mother Wanda was pretty great. Wanda supported her son, and she realized that by trying to protect him he was doubting himself.

~Likewise Javier and his mother have a pretty tight relationship too. I wish there would've been more focus on Javier's mom, given what happens, but she's kind of forgotten.

~Moss's love for his city and his community. He takes pride in being from Oakland, and it's presented in a positive light. Knowing Mark lived there for years, I can imagine he walked the same streets and road the same trains. He really brings the city alive.

~Moss and Javier's friendship was sweet and cute. I adored them and how they just sort of clicked. It was easy to see why Moss would have such deep affection for him over so short a time.

~Moss's ways of coping with his anxiety and how he remembers his father were well done also. As someone with anxiety, I could sympathize with Moss's spiraling self-doubts. The rolodex of memories he keeps of his father shows that had a great relationship, and it was clear how much his father's absence still effects him. 

~The action sequences were very well-written and felt like something you'd see in the movies. Or on the news. =/ The action just exploded off the page and was a big part of why I felt the second half was more solidly written than the first half. These are the parts that flowed the best for me.

~There's no closure. There can't be. 

 

Some negatives:

~The dialogue was often exposition-heavy and felt more like I was being continually hit over the head with an anvil as the world of West Oakland High was being established. Maybe that was by design, but I thought it would've been more effective if more subtly handled. Show, don't tell.

~On that same note, there's also a lot of info-dumping. Moss is walking through his neighborhood early in the story, thinking about who lives where and what they're like, but we don't meet most of these people. By the time we do eventually meet some of them, I'd forgotten everything that was info-dumped about them.

~The same thing happens when we first meet Moss's school friends. Each one is introduced with two or three facts about them, and that's pretty much all the development most of them get. I also had trouble getting a sense of their personalities since they all talked and acted the same. 

~White people jokes are racist jokes too.

~The treatment of Esperanza was abysmal. Moss gets angry at her because she doesn't 100% immediately understand his personal life experience. He doesn't have to make any effort to understand her life, but she's just supposed to magically understand his life and when she doesn't she's a bad friend. The resolution with this character was total fubar. Moss was a jerk towards her for most of the book. (Other reviewers have gone into detail about this.)

~The metal detectors: They don't work that way. I even did some research after that scene because it pulled me out of the book so much. The info that the vice principal gives them later somewhat explains it but it's never explained how a broke, inner-city school could afford any of this stuff, much less how the police could afford it in these days of budget cuts. Even at bargain basement discount prices, military equipment isn't cheap.

~The info the vice principal gives them was never mentioned again, even when Moss had that reporter's attention. 

 

We all know race relations suck in this country, and we've all seen the various stories about police shootings and brutality, and campus cops manhandling students. It's also been disclosed that the military have experimented on our own citizens, so the idea of something like this happening in a school isn't entirely implausible. In a near-dystopian future, this could be all too real. We also have a long history in this country of the police and military coming in to break up peaceful protests with excessive force. Situations like the ones described in this book do happen, and this book doesn't pull any punches. This is an important discussion, and there needs to be more books that focus on these issues. I just feel this story could have been told with more nuance and less hammering. Instead, we get a book were all the good guys are super good, and all the bad guys are super bad. And white. Because ALL white people are the enemy, doncha know. (No, they're not.)

 

I'm still not sure how to rate this. I want to give it four stars for the spotlight it shines on some serious issues and because some of the writing was really solid. The execution of its message often fell into the two-star range though, but splitting it for a three-star rating doesn't seem right either, so I'm leaving this unrated.

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text 2018-06-05 22:38
Used book order fail/updated

I did get a response from them and a refund.  I feel better now.

 

Thank you for bringing this to our attention, it is appreciated.

I do apologize for this order being damaged.

I have just submitted a full refund.

Please do not return this order.

We also apologize for the error on our part and for the inconvenience.

If you require any further assistance, please let us know.

Thank you,

 

I buy a lot of books used on Amazon and I have never had such a bad experience!  I have been waiting for it for what seems like forever.  I always buy them listed as "Good" so I can read them and post them on paperbackswap.com.  This book was listed as "Condition: Used - Good - All pages and cover are intact. Spine and/or cover may show signs of wear. Some creasing is on the cover. ~ Goodwill Industries of Greater Grand Rapids, Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to changing lives and communities through the power of work.

 

I just sent this message.

 

Here is a copy of the e-mail that you sent to goodwill_grand_rapids.

------------- Begin message -------------

I'm very disappointed in the book I received today.  I would not have ordered from you if I had known I'd receive a book with a broken spine.  At the front and back the pages have broken away from the spine and I can see into the binding.  I don't mind shelf wear or creases etc but this book is wanting to fall apart in my hands.  Also, the very thin package it was mailed in was too small and split so it wasn't even completely covered during shipping.  I don't want to have to send this back to you.  It is garbage.  I'd rather give you bad feedback.  This book isn't even "Acceptable" and it was listed as "good."  This book is trash and should never have been listed for sale.

 

_______________________

I'm reading those Annie's Attic Mysteries and since I'm not good at waiting for them to come up on pbs I order them used and then share them with friends on pbs.  I always have people lined up to get the book after me so I never order the ones listed acceptable or that say they might have underlining or highlighting etc.  The cost wasn't much and would have paid more to get a decent book.  I'm so annoyed right now and I hope they fix this and don't expect me to mail this pos back.  If they do I'd be happy to also send them the package they had this book crammed into also.  You can see where the one side split open.

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review 2018-01-29 17:28
The gift of Anger by Arun Gandhi
The Gift of Anger: And Other Lessons from My Grandfather Mahatma Gandhi - Arun Gandhi

I’ve been perusing through the highlighted sections (of which there are many) in order to start with a quote, but there are so many fantastic one’s that I’m finding it hard to choose. The short one below sums up the book, so seems like a good choice.

 

Move the world through love, not fear

 

This short book (153 pages) was written by Arun Gandhi, Gandhi’s grandson. Each chapter is a lesson, for example lesson one: use anger for good. These lessons were learnt at a time when Arun was a child and was living with Gandhi.

 

Gandhi taught Arun (and the world) numerous lessons about how we should all be treated as equal. He lived a very sparse life as he refused to have more comforts that the poorest Indian. The lessons sometimes frustrated the young Arun, for example when he threw a pencil stub away and Gandhi made him find it, to learn how waste is violence on the world. Essentially, though, these lessons were prophetic in the larger scope. Arun ties all the lessons in with current events so we see how they can still be utilised today.

 

The guiding principle which underscored all the others was that of non-violence. Gandhi believed that anger is useful when it’s utilised correctly and can be a force for good. All too often in today’s world we are told to stuff our anger, that it has no use, but that’s not what Gandhi believed. For example, the anger he felt at the British, for prohibiting Indians from gathering salt and imposing taxes on that which they sold, was used to fuel a peaceful protest where Gandhi and many others went down to the sea and took their salt from the water there.

 

I have learnt so much from this book, not just how to be a better person, but how to use my anger as a source for change. I’ll go back to it often.

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text 2018-01-18 22:39
Reading progress update: I've read 153 out of 153 pages.
The Gift of Anger: And Other Lessons from My Grandfather Mahatma Gandhi - Arun Gandhi

This book was excellent. Everyone should read it. Gandhi was a great man who we can all learn a lot from. 

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text 2017-12-24 04:37
Reading progress update: I've read (approx) 20 out of 288 pages.
Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right - Arlie Russell Hochschild

I found this in the pubic library's digital collection, which appears to have been expanded recently.

 

I've read Hochschild before and have at least one of her books in my personal collection, but I've never had any personal contact with her.

 

The beginning of the book is disturbing to me, and maybe it's meant to be.  The author, a noted liberal/progressive, takes her research skills to Louisiana to try to find out why Tea Partiers feel the way they do, with the strongest possible emphasis on feel.  And then she intends to use that understanding of their feelings to find ways to find common ground with them.

 

And yes, I know I used the word "find" many times in that paragraph.

 

The reason the beginning was so disturbing was that Hochschild acknowledges that the divide between right and left has widened over the years because the right has moved further right but the left has not moved further left.

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