logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: British-political-history
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-09-28 05:38
Podcast #72 is up!
The Royal Navy in the Age of Austerity 1919-22 Naval and Foreign Policy under Lloyd George - G.H. Bennett

My seventy-second podcast -- an interview with Harry Bennett about the shifts in British naval policy after the First World War -- is up on the New Books Network website! This one was a long time in coming, as I had originally recorded it in December; unfortunately, technical issues delayed the post-production process until now. I hope you enjoy the results!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-09-12 17:16
My sixty-ninth podcast is up!
The City of London and Social Democracy: The Political Economy of Finance in Post-war Britain - Aled Davies

My latest podcast is up on the New Books Network website! In it, I interview Aled Davies about his book on how the growing financialization of the British economy in the 1960s and 1970s affected social democracy in the postwar era. Enjoy!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-06-01 06:19
Podcast #50 is up!
Radicalism and Reputation: The Career of Bronterre O'Brien - Michael J. Turner

My latest podcast is up on the New Books Network website! In it I interview Michael J. Turner ot his new biography of James Bronterre O'Brien, the 19th English radical writer who was a key figure in the Chartist movement. Enjoy!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-05-18 15:41
My forty-fifth podcast is up!
‘Guilty Women’, Foreign Policy, and Appeasement in Inter-War Britain - Julie V. Gottlieb

My latest podcast is up on the New Books Network website! In it I interview Julie Gottlieb about her recent book on the role of women in the British appeasement debates of the 1930s. Enjoy!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-28 18:12
Women and appeasement
‘Guilty Women’, Foreign Policy, and Appeasement in Inter-War Britain - Julie V. Gottlieb

All too often, foreign policy has been treated as though it were exclusively the concern of men, with women usually seen either as passive participants or as secondary support. Breaking that paradigm often requires broadening the view of foreign policy formulation to take into account other, less tangible factors, such as political rhetoric, public opinion, and social encounters in which women were often able to exert influence on international relations. One such example of this was in the appeasement debates in Britain in the 1930s, in which, as Julie Gottlieb reveals in this book, women played a significant role in both the advocacy for appeasement and in the efforts to urge a stronger stance towards Nazi Germany.

 

Gottlieb's examination is divisible into three areas. The first is in the role women played in public activism. This was an area in which women enjoyed their greatest prominence, as their participation in such activities as peace movements and refugee aid organizations had long provided them with an entrée into public discussions regarding foreign affairs. By contrast their participation in electoral politics was more novel, yet here Gottlieb describes the role that women played as well, not just in terms of elected officials such as Nancy Astor, but others such as Annie Chamberlain who, while not a Member of Parliament nonetheless enjoyed a degree of public prominence and played an important role as a campaigner for her husband, Neville. Their presence proved more than symbolic, and they were seen as important conduits to the millions of recently enfranchised women, whose votes now had to be factored into the political calculus of any decision.

 

By expanding the analysis of the participants in the arguments over appeasement, Gottlieb has provided a long-overdue correction to a traditionally blinkered understanding of the participants in the contemporary debates over appeasement. While her writing can be a little dense due to her over-reliance upon jargon, she nonetheless provides an invaluable study of the development of British foreign policy in the 1930s. No future study of the subject can afford to ignore the fresh perspective she has brought to it, and hopefully it can serve as a model for similar studies that can restore women to an area of history from which that have been unjustly left out for too long.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?