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review 2018-06-24 12:58
Realpolitik or Prejudicial, it matters
A Caribbean Mystery - Agatha Christie

My copy of this novel is an edition printed in 1964 for ‘The Book Club’ and costing 16s. 0d. Unsurprising perhaps that ‘A Caribbean Mystery’ has the feel of a bygone era, when colonialism, feminism, racism, sexual orientation and the class system were clearly viewed quite differently. Indeed, it might be harsh to criticize the author for expressing attitudes prevalent at the time, but while Agatha Christie’s admirers are legion, this book does feel dated by the absence of contemporary enlightenment. For example, the suggestion by a key character that his attractive wife can expect the unrequited attention of other men and “has to pass things off with a laugh and a shrug” might not be so trivialized today! Still less the description by Miss Marple’s nephew (Raymond) of his “queer” friend, who can be relied upon to keep his aunt's St. Mary Mead cottage spick and span in her absence! But, if the reader can tolerate the glut of political incorrectness and blatant prejudices, the cast of characters is very familiar – retired military man; clergyman and sister; wealthy business tycoon and retainers; couples (not quite as they seem); medical Dr; and servants.
The setting is the Golden Palm Hotel on the island of St Honoré, where Raymond has sent his aunt to recover from a winter bout of pneumonia. Intriguingly, this is the only foreign adventure undertaken by the redoubtable Miss Marple, but the hotel with its expats and imperialist pretensions is an enjoyable proxy for an English country home.

Albeit, Miss Marple finds her surroundings rather boring, until retired Major Palgrave (he of the drinker's purple face and a glass eye) invites her to see the photograph of a murderer. 

Amid clicking knitting needles Miss Marple quietly marshals the facts of the murders that follow and stereotypical fellow residents, culminating in a gently satisfying resolution. I particularly enjoyed the alliance with wealthy curmudgeon, Mr Rafiel, who puts in a re-appearance in the 1971 novel, "Nemesis". No doubt the quaintness of Christie's story lines is part of the enduring appeal, but in this example, the genteel behaviour of the characters cannot disguise the attendant challenges for the modern reader.

 

 

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review 2018-04-20 17:28
The Not-Quite States of America by Doug Mack
The Not-Quite States of America: Dispatches from the Territories and Other Far-Flung Outposts of the USA - Doug Mack

A book about America’s territories: part travelogue, part history, part investigation of the territories’ political status, this is a lightweight, readable introduction to a complicated topic. Doug Mack takes readers along on his trip through the territories: beginning in the U.S. Virgin Islands, then traveling to American Samoa, Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands in the Pacific, and ending with a trip to Puerto Rico. He even makes a stop in the Marshall Islands and briefly discusses the U.S.’s “freely associated states” of the Marshall Islands, Palau, and the Federated States of Micronesia. (These are independent Pacific Island countries that have a special relationship with the U.S., even having U.S. post offices and citizens serving in the U.S. military; as a group, they were best known to me for being the only other U.N. member states to always vote against sanctions for Israel.) Along the way, he shares his research about the territories in an accessible way that provides a good primer for readers new to the topic.

I found this book interesting, educational and easy to read. The author shows readers each territory as a unique place and digs into their histories and the history of U.S. international policies more broadly. He also examines the legal oddities governing the rights of the territories and their residents: for instance, they are eligible for some public benefits on their islands, but never become eligible for others even when living in the mainland U.S. (some of which actual foreign immigrants can receive after several years). Meanwhile mainland Americans can’t vote for president if they relocate to the territories. Mack pushes for opinions on the territories’ political status, and except in Puerto Rico often finds them hard to come by; for the most part, territory residents seem to prefer a flawed status quo to possibly losing individuality by becoming a state, or losing economically by becoming independent.

Mack could have improved the book a bit by being a little more willing to go out of his comfort zone as a traveler. He does meet a variety of people living in the territories, including, in the Northern Mariana Islands, a man who spent several years in another part of the Pacific learning traditional navigation, and a woman who immigrated from China to work in the garment factories. But his only exposure to obeah in the U.S. Virgin Islands is asking a well-off couple (he’s a local but she is a scuba instructor from the mainland U.S.) about it, to which they essentially smile and roll their eyes. Toward the end, he comments with surprising honesty that “In all my travels in the territories, I’d seen countless shacks and set foot in many middle-class houses and gaped from afar at the occasional oceanfront villa.” It doesn’t seem to occur to him to try to get invitations to some shacks as well, and the book gives little sense of how most people live in the territories.

All that said, with the exception of Puerto Rico, the territories are tiny islands about which relatively little has been written, especially in such an easy-to-read, bite-sized format, and this book did an excellent job of filling them out on my mental map. I would recommend it to any American to learn a bit more about some of the furthest-flung parts of the country. It can even be funny: did you know about the U.S. government’s machinations in the 19th century to claim uninhabitated islands for their bird poop?

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