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Search tags: Emily-St-John-Mandel
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review 2018-10-06 13:22
Station Eleven ★★☆☆☆
Station Eleven: A novel - Emily St. John Mandel

I can see why some would really love this book. It’s well written in terms of the prose and it is one of those books that has Things to Say. I could not love it, though. This is a post-apocalyptic story that spends the majority of its time looking back to its characters’ lives and the world as it was pre-apocalypse. Or, in other words, to society as it is today. It is a book about Now, set in a future world and society that should be infinitely more interesting.

 

Worse, it failed to engage my emotions in any of the gazillion characters introduced. They went places, and did things, and felt feelings, and I didn’t care about any of them.

 

And worst of all, this was an unsatisfyingly implausible post-apocalyptic world. The few explanations of how it works just seem implausible. Over 300 people gathered to create a new society in an airport. How did they sustain themselves after all the airport snacks and restaurants ran out of food? They hunted for apparently plentiful deer in a nearby forest. With an NSA handgun and apparently giant stockpile of bullets. After that? Who knows. The story is more interested in how they created a school to teach their children, not about life skills needed to survive in a post-apocalyptic world, but about how you used to be able to push a button and talk to someone on the other side of the world, or about how you could fly in planes. Characters spend all their time talking about the lost internet and all the information lost to them with it. Hello, people, have you heard of books? They apparently only read gossip magazines. And so on.

 

 

Audiobook, via Audible. Excellent performance by Kirsten Potter. I read this for the 2018 Halloween Bingo square Doomsday: anything related to the end of the world, doomsday cults, or a post-apocalypse world.

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text 2018-10-05 12:15
Station Eleven - 58%
Station Eleven: A novel - Emily St. John Mandel

Starting to get tedious, but not so much that I'd DNF at this point. Why is it that the characters in a postapocalyptic world spend more time in pointless recollections of the old world, bemoaning the lack of internet for looking up information, than on actual survival planning or basic life skills? I know there's been a move toward electronic media, but print books do still exist. They break into stores and homes but spend time looking at people's clothes and toys and never even mention looking for books on gardening or mechanics or well-digging or whatever. 

 

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text 2018-10-04 14:49
Station Eleven - 20%
Station Eleven: A novel - Emily St. John Mandel

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that when a resident of a small town whispers to you that a prophet has taken over and you'd better stop asking questions and leave ASAP, then you'd better run away fast.

 

Except in books, where otherwise sensible people just keep hanging around and asking questions. 

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text 2018-10-03 14:08
Station Eleven - 10%
Station Eleven: A novel - Emily St. John Mandel

This is off to a really good start. I hope I can keep up with it on audio. Supposedly the timeline jumps around a lot - not an ideal pick for audio, but this was on sale, so..

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review 2018-09-03 13:01
Station Eleven
Station Eleven - Emily St. John Mandel

Fun fact: Nearly every time I read a book involving a pandemic wiping out 99% of humanity, it coincides with me catching a cold. My immune system is not only totally sucky, it’s also highly suggestible. Apparently.

 

I was hoping to love this more than I did. Literary doomsday novels are possibly my favorite brand of doom and gloom. This one had a good story, but the writing didn’t float my boat. I wasn’t a fan of the excessive sentence fragments or the fragmented narration style, and some of the stylistic choices just led to confusion. Thoughts weren’t differentiated from prose in any way, so there are sudden skews from third person to first, and sometimes the effect was disorienting.

 

Still, the writing is good, even if it wasn’t exactly my cuppa, and the characterization was pretty stellar. If Ann Patchett wrote doomsday novels, I think they’d feel a lot like Station Eleven.

 

I read this for the Halloween Bingo 2018 Doomsday square.

 

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