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review 2018-06-16 14:49
As I Lay Dying
As I Lay Dying - William Faulkner

Okay, as I explained in an earlier post I've decided to delve into some 'Classics.' At a Writer's Conference in San Diego about two years ago, I had heard a pair of young female agents discussing how they would never have agreed to represent the likes of Hemingway or Fitzgerald. They found their work 'not up to standards.' As I am old enough to be their grandfather I dismissed their ramblings. Later while talking to an older female agent I mentioned this. She told me that's the problem in today's publishing world. Too many young female agent with a narrow point of view.
It nagged at me though as I had not actually read many 'classic' books since my youth. 
So, about a month ago, as previously posted, while I was rearranging book shelves (actual book shelves, not on line ones) I took a hard look at the dozens of 'Classic' novels that I had but never read. The words of my minimalist daughter rang in my ears, "Dad, if you're never going to read these old books get rid of them." So I decided to add a classic book to my current readings. This one, As I Lay Dying , was the first. 
It started out weird. I was told to never imitate people's dialects in writing, yet here Faulkner was doing just that. And, I found it annoying at first, I wanted to quit. But, I ALWAYS finish a book, so I stuck it out. I got more into the characters and toward the end the story blossomed. I give it two stars because it is hard to read but I'm glad to have read it. Is it a Classic? Don't really know, you tell me.

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review 2018-06-11 23:05
As I Lay Dying
As I Lay Dying - William Faulkner

Okay my new thing is not to act out of the moment so I'm going to wait a few days then write a review.  

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review 2018-05-06 00:29
Lord of Ravens (Inheritance #3)
Lord of Ravens (Inheritance Book 3) - Amelia Faulkner

CW: Child abuse, drugs:

Laurence sees back in time to the first time Quentin's father beats him. The scene cuts out as his father is preparing to rape him. It's brought up a few times afterward, but no further details are given. :( Seeing this also causes Laurence to try to score heroin later, thankfully unsuccessfully.

(spoiler show)

 

Well, this certainly didn't go in the direction I thought it would, at least in regards to Laurence and Quentin's relationship, which is a good thing. They only deepen their relationship here, and grow more intimate with each other, and after the last two books of patience and hard work to get to this point, I was happy for the guys getting some happiness. They deserve it.

 

We do finally learn what Quentin's father did to him as a child, which is exactly what I thought it was going to be (see CW above). The reason for why he did it was more messed up than I thought it'd be though, and I'm dreading when Quentin remembers or finds out. He's getting stronger and more sure of himself all the time, but his father has a way of reducing him to a scared little kid again.

 

We get to see Neil again, and he's a riot as always, and I love that he just accepts Quentin and clearly understands him as well as Laurence has come to. I wish we'd seen more of Ethan, Aiden and Maryam, but the story didn't allow much time for that, what with the introduction of Amy and Rufus - and we don't even really get a whole lot of time either, but what we do get looks promising.

 

In a book titled Lord of Ravens, I was expecting ravens to be a little more prominent and important to the central plot but that didn't really happen. Instead, Laurence gets a baby raven that he has to raise, and as with babies everywhere it does nothing but eat and poop the whole story.

 

I feel like this book was just a little disjointed, or more accurately that it served more as a bridge to the next book. There is a beginning, middle and end, but the main conflict is still ongoing, so nothing really feels resolved. I do like that Laurence and Quentin actually communicate with each other (though there is a brief Big Misunderstanding), and that real life considerations are taken into account when weird mystical things happen.

 

And lastly, I suppose it had to happen eventually: the geography fail. :P
-No matter what time of the year it is, the sun never sets as early as 4 PM or as late as 9 PM in San Diego. It certainly would never be setting at 4 and fully set after 9. Most people I know wouldn't say the sun is setting until it's within a half-hour of the sundown. (There are websites that'll give you sunset/sunrise times for any location on any date you could wish to know about.)
-Americans don't use meters to measure distance (unless they're scientists). We use feet and yards. Dating a Brit isn't going to change that.

 

There were also more typos in this one than I recall in the previous installments. The most distracting one was the constant use of "noone" instead of "no one." Hopefully this doesn't remain an issue going forward.

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quote 2018-04-12 21:09
To dziwna rzecz, ale bez względu na to, co ci dolega, mężczyzna zawszw ci doradzi, żebyś sprawdził zęby, a kobieta - żebyś się ożenił. A już taki, co nigdy w życiu do niczego nie doszedł, na pewno będzie cię pouczał, jak powinieneś prowadzić swoje interesy. Podobnie jak profesorzy na wyższych uczelniach, co to nie mają jednej pary skarpetek w majątku, a mówią, jak zarobić milion w dziesięć lat, albo kobieta, która nie umiała sobie nawet zdobyć męża, będzie cię pouczać, jak masz chować dzieci.
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quote 2018-04-10 09:31

Każdy człowiek jest sędzią własnych cnót, ale niechże nikt nie daje recepty na szczęście drugiemu człowiekowi.
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