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Search tags: Gone-with-the-Wind
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review 2017-12-09 02:26
Aw HELL no
Sweet Wind, Wild Wind - Elizabeth Lowell

I consulted with myself and we decided that there was no way we could finish this without wanting to put a hole in something (preferably a .45 sized hole). I mean; it's bad enough with the initial vibes of teenage-YA heroine throwing herself at older neighbor and being rejected but then you read further and figure out that he set out purposefully to seduce and, when she caved, reject her to humiliate her, all because his adoptive father - her natural father (but her parents never married) didn't love him enough to suit him. And that daddy dearest, on his deathbed apparently revealed that as a condition of the H inheriting the ranch, he had to make an heir with the h... Ok, no. No, no, a thousand times no.

 

I read the end - I know that she finds out *after* she slept with him (why she slept with him is beyond me) and left but it didn't stick so... TSTL heroine too apparently.

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review 2017-12-07 04:24
A Wind in the Door - Madeleine L'Engle

I read this one in less than a day when home sick from work.

 

I was unimpressed. I don't know if I read this before or not, but I'm personally not a fan of metaphysics

 

...allow me to explain. I consider myself a scientist. I understand science. I consider myself a spiritual person. I understand spiritual questing. I do not, however, think that scientific principles can be applied (especially by non-scientists) to spiritual matters. What you get is nonsense and mumbo-jumbo.

 

And THIS book was mumbo-jumbo.

 

Neither the science nor the spiritual questing in this book was believable to me. L'Engle managed to miss on both accounts.

 

Anyways, I'm beating a dead horse. I found the story contrived, dense, and trippy for trippiness' sake.I'm reading the next book, though, because I'm no quitter... (=

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review 2017-11-02 13:49
V.C. Andrews - the Dollanganger Series
Flowers in the Attic - V.C. Andrews
Petals on the Wind - V.C. Andrews
If There Be Thorns - V.C. Andrews
Seeds of Yesterday (Dollanganger Series) - V.C. Andrews
Garden of Shadows (Dollanganger Series) - V.C. Andrews

Sadly, this wasn't the first VCA book I ever read (I started off with the Cutler family series) but when I finally got around to Flowers in the Attic, I was not disappointed. It is easily one of the best books I have ever read. The drama, the intrigue, the suspense... I have read this book several times and never get tired of it.

You can't help but feel bad for the poor kids, especially with their harsh treatment by their grandmother and the blatant selfishness of their mother. One might wonder why the events in this book have transpired as they have, but this book is simply the first in a fascinating five-book series, and the rest of the series explains why this book was the way it was, especially the fifth, which serves as a prequel. The entire saga is riveting!

 

After reading Flowers in the Attic, I was happy to continue the story with Petals on the Wind. If I were Cathy, I'd be supremely pissed off at my own mother, and want to plot revenge. It was sad in some parts, but a satisfying read overall.

The trio that managed to escape the Foxworth mansion after the death of their brother are forever scarred by their traumatic experience, especially Carrie, who constantly struggles with the physical and mental scars that are left on her. Despite being adopted by a man who treats them well, the children can't quite get over what happened, though Chris is more quick to move on and start a productive life in medicine. Cathy desires revenge - perfectly justified - but makes some stupid decisions along the way. However, her thirst for revenge comes to fruiton as she lashes against the evil grandmother and her mother.

All in all, this is a worthy continuation of Flowers in the Attic, with things coming full circle, so to speak (at least in some aspects, since this series still has 3 more books to go)

 

If There Be Thorns doesn't have the same feel as FitA or PotW, but is still a wonderful book. People wonder why Malcolm was the way he was, and Bart's reading of his journal helps to shed some light in why the Foxworth bloodline became so twisted and why Malcolm treated/saw women the way he did. The storyline focuses on Jory and Bart, and how they come to know the old lady next door - and her dark secret, and how Malcolm's madness continued to live on. A definite must-read for any VCA fan.

 

Seeds of Yesterday doesn't have so much to do with the first three Dollanganger books, as it's now 1997 (over a decade set after the actual date VCA published this, in the mid-80's) but still stands as a decent story in its own right, with the surprising reappearance of a character long thought dead. And religion comes back with this character, reminding Chris and Cathy all too well why they didn't want anything to do with religion. As a part of a series, Seeds of Yesterday doesn't contribute overmuch to the Foxworth saga, which is sad, because it'd have been nice to learn more about the Foxworths.

Just one plothole - in SoY, it's 1997, but in the next book 'Garden of Shadows' (prequel to Flowers in the Attic), Olivia Foxworth's will included a letter to be opened 20 years after her death (which was the story of GoS) and her death was in 1972, so Chris and Cathy should have read GoS by now, five years before SOY, and already be aware of what happened between Malcolm and Olivia.
 
After reading the rest of the Dollanganger series, I was naturally eager to start Garden of Shadows. It is stunning how a woman that you end up feeling sorry for turns into such a horrible person in FitA. Yes, Olivia went through a bad transformation, but here you see who the REAL villain is.

Tempting hints of Malcolm and Olivia's turbulent relationship with one another and their children and grandchildren were hinted at in previous books, but here, from Olivia's own viewpoint, we see why she has suffered. Mind you, this doesn't absolve her of the bad things she did, but you can see how she became the kind of person she did, and what led Chris and Corrine to run away from home. It is sad that V.C. Andrews died before she could complete this book, as the ghostwriter wrote much of this, and one can not help but wonder how the book would have been had VCA been able to complete it.
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review 2017-10-14 22:22
Beautifully Written
The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicle, #1) - Patrick Rothfuss

Patrick Rothfuss is one of my top fantasy authors. His writing is flawless, his world-building masterful, and his magic system so well done as to almost be believable.

 

The Name of the Wind is an epic fantasy about the extraordinary life journey of Kvothe, child genius turned renowned...hero? villain? We don't know. At the beginning of the story we find him hidden away at an inn in the middle of nowhere with his assistant. A chronicler finds him and convinces him to tell his story. Kvothe agrees, but says he'll do it over 3 days. The Name of the Wind is day 1 of that telling. We experience his adventures as he grows up and makes it to University. While there are plot lines in Kvothe's telling that end nicely at the end of this book, Rothfuss leaves enough open to make us what to continue to the next. The added plot of things occurring in real time while Kvothe tells his story, just adds that much more incentive to continue on to the next book.

 

The character development, world-building, and magic system all add to an amazing plot. I can't wait to find out if Kvothe is hero or villain.

 

I loved this book. Highly recommended.

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review 2017-10-07 18:42
Wrangler's Challenge (Wind River Valley) by Lindsay McKenna
Wrangler's Challenge (Wind River) - Lindsay McKenna

 

With action packed tales and emotionally revealing characters, Lindsay McKenna has been bridging the gap between romance and suspense for years.  Although she has a foot in both genres what appeals to me is the fact that she takes on high risks subjects that are realistic and far reaching.  For me the appeal is that she uses her voice to make a difference in the world by spotlighting topics that are controversial but no less important.  Subjects like rape, war and the after effects of the people who experience these.   Wrangler's Challenge puts two such character's center stage as they struggle with the danger they've seen, the people they've lost and the demons that followed them home.  Impactive reading that is both entertaining and informative.

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