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review 2018-07-12 21:25
Ana and Kata: “Summerland” by Hannu Rajaniemi
Summerland - Hannu Rajaniemi


Ana and Kata: “Summerland” by Hannu Rajaniemi


“Yet the longer you lived in Summerland, the stranger things became. Your hypersight grew more acute, and little by little, you developed an awareness of two additional directions that were invisible to the living. One was the ana direction, four-up. Towards ana lay the world of the living, in its own thin slice of the aether. It was the direction of the Unseen, the mysterious source of hyperlight and soul. Luz stones fell from ana, lodged themselves in dense aetheric configurations like brains at birth. Upon death, the luz detached and fell below the plane of the living world in the kata direction – the equivalent of down in the fourth [spatial] dimension.”

In “Summerland” by Hannu Rajaniemi



I don’t know how much physics people reading this post know. So, here’s a very, very, very brief synopsis on how objects in 1D, 2D, 3D, 4D space move:

Dimensional space Movement that can be made in that space
1D -> Forward, backward
2D -> Forward, backward, right, left
3D -> Forward, backward, right, left, up, down
4D -> Forward, backward, right, left, up, down, ana (imagine the object coming down from heaven), kata (imagine the object going up from hell)


As you can see, in 4D space we’ve got two additional directions: ana and kata. If want more than this by way of explanation, you’ve got to look elsewhere.
 
 
If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

 

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url 2018-05-15 17:21
Tor.com's Ebook of the Month Club: The Quantum Thief by Hannu Rajaniemi
The Quantum Thief - Hannu Rajaniemi

You have until 11:59 PM ET May 18th, 2018 to download this, and you must live in the U.S. or Canada.

 

According to my records, I own this already, so I probably won't be downloading it.

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review 2017-06-15 20:36
[Book Review] The Quantum Thief
The Quantum Thief - Hannu Rajaniemi

At it's core, The Quantum Thief is a heist story, but within its post-human setting the object of the heist is nothing so simple as something like the Hope Diamond or a Casino vault.  Instead we journey through theft and reclaiming of time and memory.

All-in-all, it makes for a blistering smart and layered hard sci-fi adventure.

This book had a little less specific discussion questions for me to draw out, but it was a fantastic and fascinating read.  Should I actually sit down with other people who've read it, there's definitely a lot to knock about, but the questions and discussion prompts themselves are harder for me to quantify.

Discussion Fodder:

  • Let's talk about the Prisoner's Dilemma.  What is it, and in what ways is it used in this story?  What do you think of the Dilemma Prison?
  • What are the different ways humanity and cultures manifest in the story?  How are they shaped by technology (or vice versa)?
  • An Oubliette is a dungeon with an opening only at the top or a place of forgetting.  What is the Oubliette in this story?  What are the roles of memory and privacy in this society?  How do they interact?  How do they shape the culture?
  • In this setting, what counts as human? 
Source: libromancersapprentice.blogspot.com/2017/06/book-review-quantum-thief.html
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text 2017-05-06 18:54
May read
The Quantum Thief - Hannu Rajaniemi

Also it seems to be "Tegan reads Finnish authors" time, since I randomly am reading two back-to-back (previously read Core of the Sun, review and discussion guide coming soon).

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text 2016-03-15 16:38
Top Ten Tuesday: March 15, 2016
Hannu Rajaniemi: Collected Fiction - Hannu Rajaniemi
The Unfortunate Decisions of Dahlia Moss - Max Wirestone
The Witch of Lime Street: Seance, Seduction, and Houdini in the Spirit World - David Jaher
The Builders - Daniel Polansky
Investigating Lois Lane: The Turbulent History of the Daily Planet's Ace Reporter - Tim Hanley
Ladies Night at the Dreamland (Crux: The Georgia Series in Literary Nonfiction Ser.) - Sonja Livingston,John Griswold
Jane Steele - Lyndsay Faye
The Beauty Volume 1 - Jason A. Hurley,Jeremy Haun
Sister Light, Sister Dark - Jane Yolen
Through the Habitrails (Comic) - Jeff Nicholson

(Original Top Ten Tuesday concept and topic from The Broke and the Bookish)

 

Today's list is slated to be Ten Books On My Spring TBR, but rather than make a TBR for spring when I’ve barely made headway into any of the others I’ve made for past Top Tens, I’m going to go with a list of the Top 10 ARCs I Desperately Need to Read ASAP (which is still a TBR, I know). I’ve been sitting on some of these ARCs for over a year, which kind of goes against the whole “reading in advance of release” thing.

 

Hannu Rajaniemi: Collected Fiction by Hannu Rajaniemi. I’ve dipped into it and love the style, but just haven’t been into a lot of short fiction lately.

 

The Unfortunate Decisions of Dahlia Moss by Max Wirestone. This was requested based on one really strong review. Perhaps not the best barometer of my own interest.

 

The Witch of Lime Street by David Jaher. Another one that came from a strong recommendation and has yet to be cracked open.

 

The Builders by David Polansky. I’m really interested to see where the Tor novellas are going to go. It would help if I read the only one I’ve requested so far. Plus, talking animals.

 

Investigating Lois Lane by Tim Hanley. I’ve never been terribly interested in Superman, but Lois’ history sounds fascinating.

 

Ladies Night at the Dreamland by Sonja Livingston. I really love essay collections, university press publications, and books about women, so this looks to be promising.

 

Jane Steele by Lyndsay Faye. I’ve started this one, but it’s very dark (Jane Eyre if Jane were a serial killer!) and I’m taking my time.

 

The Beauty Volume 1 by Jeremy Haun and Jason A. Hurley. An interesting premise and the cover art drew me in.

 

Sister Light, Sister Dark by Jane Yolen. I’ve actually read this book before, but it was more than 15 years ago and I remember nothing other than I enjoyed it. I know I will like it and I want to boost the signal for it as a re-launch of a title that has been out of print for some time.

 

Through the Habitrails by Jeff Nicholson. It will be interesting to see how an early 90s social commentary comic holds up (from what I can tell, very little has changed).

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