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Search tags: Inspirational
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url 2018-04-13 11:03
Brain Magic Mindfulness Training in Sunday Times Conscious Creativity Excerpt
Conscious Creativity: Mindfulness Meditations - Nataša Pantović Nuit

Tapping the brain’s magic

With traditional educational methods – its curriculum and its focus on examinations – students quickly lose motivation and interest for science and its magic.

With traditional educational methods – its curriculum and its focus on examinations – students quickly lose motivation and interest for science and its magic.

The human brain is truly extraordinary. A healthy brain has some 200 billion neurons. The conscious mind controls our brain for only five per cent of the day, whereas the subconscious mind has control of our thoughts 95 per cent of the time.

A human being has 70,000 thoughts per day
- Natasa Pantovic

A human being has 70,000 thoughts per day. The brain requires up to 20 per cent of the body’s energy despite being only two per cent of the human body by weight.

Somewhere within our brain we have a potential for higher mathematics, complex physics, art, and amazing richness of thoughts, feeling, and sensations.

 

To read the full book excerpt, check Times of Malta Article by Nataša Nuit Pantović

 

https://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20121007/education/Tapping-the-brain-s-magic.439967

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review 2018-04-04 02:01
Dramatic but Underwhelming
Shadows of Hope - Georgiana Daniels

Let me preface this by saying that this is not the type of book that I would normally pick up. Had this been promoted by a non-Christian publishing company, I would not have considered it. However, the premise sounded fairly intriguing and I wanted to dip my toes into something outside my comfort level. With that being said, “Shadows of Hope” just didn’t really get off the ground with me. The drama, while expected given the subject matter, was in my opinion overdone, and the characters didn’t resonate much with me. The narrative is divided between Marissa—whose viewpoint is related in the first person—her husband, Colin, and Kaitlyn, the “other woman”. I found it difficult at times to sympathize with Marissa because of her self-centered attitude toward her marriage and her sometimes unrealistic expectations overall. Colin didn’t seem to have many redeeming features, while Kaitlyn is portrayed as an angelic figure. The way that these three interact throughout the novel does add a definite human interest aspect, but the plot seemed too drawn out.

The faith element was present, but almost as a side note, or so it seemed for much of the story’s duration. Granted, there was no profanity or sexual situations—this was a clean read—but faith was not as prominent an issue as I was expecting and hoping for. This was hard to reconcile with my expectations. I also anticipated more suspense and was surprised when so much of the story’s backbone was revealed relatively early on. Nevertheless, I did want to find out exactly how things turned out in the end for each character. Despite not being the most compelling novel I’ve ever read, “Shadows of Hope” does offer a look at redemption and at facing life’s challenges and heartbreaks.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review.

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review 2018-03-26 21:28
Of Love and Pirates
The Pirate Bride - Kathleen Y'Barbo

As the second book in the Daughters of the Mayflower series, “The Pirate Bride” proved to be even more engaging and intriguing than “The Mayflower Bride.” This series is interesting in that it chronicles pivotal points in history from a Christian perspective, with each installment written by a different author. This arrangement keeps the volumes fresh, avoiding the repetitious pattern that could otherwise easily result. “The Pirate Bride” goes a step further and adopts a perhaps unconventional approach to what is obviously a romance, introducing the heroine—Maribel Cordoba—when she is only eleven. Her story begins aboard a ship in the Caribbean in 1724, and her fateful encounter with the privateer Jean-Luc Valmont has implications that travel far beyond that time and place.

Indeed, Maribel’s somewhat eccentric character—being rather unladylike for the time—continues into young womanhood as the narrative shifts to 1735 for the second half of the novel. Part of what drew me to Maribel’s character was her love of reading and books, which was not common during the eighteenth century, as well as her indomitable spirit. Her journey is a unique one, offering a glimpse of maritime, convent, and domestic life in and around the Caribbean. The story, as such, presents a distinctive narrative with gentle Christian undertones. How the characters’ lives connect and weave together demonstrates Kathleen Y’Barbo’s creative skill, with the romance itself playing out toward the novel’s closing. “The Pirate Bride” is a fascinating work of fiction with plenty of adventure and novelty sure to delight and entertain.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review.

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review 2018-03-18 01:57
Let My People Go
Imagine... The Ten Plagues - Matt Koceich

In this second book about time travel and Biblical stories, Matt Koceich again intertwines the two to create an incredible adventure. “Imagine: The Ten Plagues” takes the reader back to Ancient Egypt during the time of Moses and the exodus of the Israelites, seen through the eyes of a young girl. Eleven-year-old Kai Wells is facing a bully in her Florida neighborhood when suddenly she finds herself transported thousands of years back in time. She befriends a resident and becomes involved in helping a child stay safe from the Pharaoh and his servants while witnessing the plagues visited upon the hardhearted Egyptians.

“The Ten Plagues” was, in my opinion, a quicker and even more exciting read than its predecessor, “The Great Flood.” Koceich neatly creates characters to whom young readers can relate, while dealing with issues germane to what kids are facing today. This narrative focuses on bullying and standing up for what is right despite intense pressure, and yet it does not become preachy or superior. This is a great way for kids to learn a moral lesson in a fun and interesting way and to also introduce or reinforce major Biblical stories.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review.

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review 2018-03-11 00:02
Faith and the Gold Rush
My Heart Belongs in San Francisco, California: Abby's Prospects - Janice Thompson

“My Heart Belongs in San Francisco” by Janice Thompson was my introduction to this series. The storyline was not what I was expecting, especially taking into account the book’s cover, which made it all the more interesting, although I did take issue with some of the characters. Set in San Francisco in 1853 during the height of the gold rush, there is a menagerie of characters from around the country and the world, lending a balance across the spectrum of class and reputation. Abby herself comes from a background of privilege, and as such she is ill-equipped to deal with the lawlessness and immorality of the city. Her naiveté comes as no surprise, but her lack of good judgment regarding people borders on the unbelievable. She complains about being coddled and yet proves time and again that she is incapable of taking care of herself or, in many cases, making good decisions. Overall, the characters lacked depth. They were rather stereotypical and cookie-cutter, with a clear delineation between the “good guys” and the “bad guys.” Had they been more two-dimensional, the story would have profited and had more substance.

The faith element suffered a bit, as well. I agreed with all of the viewpoints on Christianity, but the way that it was presented in the novel was too heavy-handed and over the top. It seemed as though the author wanted to incorporate as many Biblical quotations as possible, but the execution was lacking, and the narrative needed more direction. The application to the characters’ lives and situations was too tidy and superficial. That is not to say that I did not enjoy the book, however. The idea of creating an aristocratic heroine in the setting of San Francisco is an intriguing one, and if the characters were fleshed out more and the plot tightened and implemented more compellingly, this would be a more absorbing story.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review.

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