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review 2017-11-09 15:10
Invisible Victims: Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women of Canada (Crimes Canada: True Crimes That Shocked The Nation) (Volume 15) - Katherine McCarthy

First the bad - there are several typos, the footnotes are, big and large, simply a website link. While this makes sense for an ebook, I still want correct citation format, sorry. Lastly, you could say that a few of the sections about serial killers are de facto ads for other books in the series. They are and they are not in my view. McCarthy does a good job of showing how those cases are related to the scope of the story, so considering the series, I'm neutral on these inclusions. Finally, and this was most annoying, it was unclear at points whether a work mentioned was an essay or a book. I spent several minutes searching for a book title when it was really an essay I should have been looking for. That was rather annoying.

HOWEVER

Those faults aside, this a pretty good overview and not at all senesation as the cover might lead some to think. McCarthy cites when she needs to and deals with the overarching issues quite well. The book is an overview, so the sections dealing with the history that lead to the society problems that allow for the murder of Indigenous women are perhaps too short, but McCarthy points you in the direction to learn more (and some of those facts, wow). McCarthy deals sympathically with the victims and points out how race and the question of "good" or "bad" girls plays into the how the media views the victim. Unlike some other work on the death of Indigenous women, McCarthy moves beyond the Highway of Tears and Residental schools and brings in classes that were not first thought of, making the book an overview. 

If the editing errors had been fixed, this would have been four stars.

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review 2017-10-29 05:38
The Heart's Invisible Furies
The Heart's Invisible Furies - John Boyne

I entered the giveaway for this book because I remember reading the Boy in the Striped Pajamas when I was in the 9th grade and crying like a little bitch so I was like I trust John Boyne to deliver another good book.

BOI DID HE.

I honestly didn't know what to expect from this book because the summary doesn't give anything away and I was like mehhhhh there is a small chance I might not like it. I'm glad I read it, maybe I wouldn't read this as often as I read some of my other books but there'll be one of those days where you're in one of those moods and I'll pick this up and read it again.

I think it's an important book, you don't see a lot of novels out there with gay characters, or one that go this in-depth into that character's life. And it talks a lot about the atrocities and struggles that gay people suffered in Ireland and perhaps still endure to this day (I can't say for sure as I'm not an expert on Ireland or even really keep up to date with Irish news). And the amount of detail that was gone into had me shook but I think that was mostly due to the fact that I've never read a book like this before.

Like ever.

I really liked Cyril as a character, he did some shady things throughout his time but considering the fact that the story is told from his point of view, it was pretty understandable. He's really funny, and sometimes makes really morbid jokes and then you find yourself laughing at what he says and thinking dear God does this make me a bad person for laughing. I liked the ways that he so openly made fun of certain people to their face and the clueless response from those people who hadn't picked up on the fact that he was mocking them.

Some of the shit happened to him was honestly so wild (view spoiler)

And you feel for Cyril, and it's kind of hard not to considering he's a gay man living in 60's Ireland. He struggles with his sexuality and his feelings, and he has a lot of realizations about himself when he meets Bastiaan. The relationship that he had with Maude and Avery was a very strange one but it appealed to me, they got along well, and to be honest his interactions with them were hilarious.

Maude was probably one of my favourite characters just because she was so out there and had the most inappropriate of reactions at the most inappropriate times.

And it brought me great happiness to see that in the end, Cyril had a large family that cared about him and that he was happy because damn it he deserved it for all of the shit that happened to him throughout his life.

TL;DR: Give this a book a shot, maybe you won't like it, but you probably will.

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review 2017-09-03 03:12
Not as great a state as you'd think
The Invisible Man - H.G. Wells

Classic cautionary tale of what genius without morals can bring about.

I found interesting that the same disregard for consequences or others was Griffin's doom itself, going beyond the whole typical "evil does not pay", because it tied to an inability to think long term, see down-sides, and plan. He even admits it himself to Kemp, without understanding the weight or scope of what he is saying, and to Kemps horror too I think. He's a petty sociopath, and he was one before the experiment.

Thomas Marvel, now *snicker*. I love how the simple fellow ended up the winner of the story. Slow but deep thinker indeed.

 

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