logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Jo-Goodman
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-10-14 18:59
Till It Stops Beating - Hannah R. Goodman

I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review as part of a blog tour for the book. 

 

This is my second time reading Hannah R. Goodman. I had previously read the YA anthology book she edited and contributed to, Sucker Literary Magazine Vol. 1. I remember really enjoying it so I was excited to read this book. 

 

Going into this book I did not know that it was part of a series so in the beginning I was a tad bit confused because there were a lot of reference to things that happened in the past. However, I was still able to piece together what happened in the previous books, so you can read this book as a standalone. 

 

This was a very touching and realistic story full of emotion and heart. It tackled a lot of heavy topics like cancer and anxiety in a respectful and caring way. There was a good balance between the happy moments and the more somber ones. 

 

As to what I didn’t like, the ending felt a but rushed to me. It ended pretty quickly. I would have liked for it to have been fleshed out a little more. 

 

There was also one line in the book that didn’t sit well with me. In describing the main character’s trip to NYC the book states, “We are right in front of one of those grocery stores that reek of Asian food and rotten produce” (83). I don’t quite know what this line was trying to get at, but to me it seemed like a slight jab at Asian grocery stores since they can sometimes be smelly. 

 

Overall, this was a wonderful and moving book. It had a few flaws, but was still an enjoyable read. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-10-08 22:02
Reading progress update: I've read 61 out of 216 pages.
Till It Stops Beating - Hannah R. Goodman
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-04 20:54
How to be a Victorian by Ruth Goodman
How To Be a Victorian - Ruth Goodman

Interesting and informative, but not as good as Goodman's Tudor book. I'm not sure why, exactly. It may be because this was written first or because I've read more about the Victorian era so less was new.

 

Goodman mostly sticks to the facts, but she relates some of her personal experience too. Don't worry, they're relevant, since they mostly relate to re-enactments of a sort where she's tried to do things in a Victorian way (wearing the clothes, eating the food, performing work using that era's technology, etc.).

 

This book took me quite a while to read, but it wasn't because it was boring or anything. Some parts were quite engaging. It's just that it took a back seat to some of my other books due to my participation in the Kill Your Darlings game and keeping up with library books.

 

It looks like a forgot to post a quote about football tactics before the rules were codified that I found amusing (p 326):

The annual football match between St Peter's and All Saints parishes in Derby was famous for its bewildering array of tactics, which included swimming down the river with the ball, as well as removing the ball's stuffing and hiding it under someone's shirt.

Makes me wonder whether the ball's skin or stuffing would be considered to be the legal ball...

 

Previous updates:

384 of 440 pages

265 of 440 pages

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-04-04 17:25
Reading progress update: I've read 384 out of 440 pages.
How To Be a Victorian - Ruth Goodman

The range of substances that were added to food during this period was astonishing, as was the near-complacency of both the authorities and the public. It was discovered that chalk and the mineral alum were almost ubiquitously present in flour and bread. Chalk was also added to milk as a whitener if it was too watery; cider and wine were sweetened with lead; and brick dust was often used to thicken cocoa. Tea leaves often contained nominal or no actual tea leaves but rather the dried leaves of a variety of hedgerow plants dyed with red lead.

 

...

 

The most adulterated foods were naturally the cheapest, with bread, flour and tea suffering the largest substitution of non-edible adulterants. The poorest families, already short of nutrients, were further starved by the chalk, pipe clay and alum that replaced a portion of their bread and flour. Most knew it, too, but there was nothing they could do.

 

That's an awful sense of desperation...

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-04-02 17:09
Reading progress update: I've read 265 out of 440 pages.
How To Be a Victorian - Ruth Goodman

"Brushing his own jacket and trousers was one of the very few household tasks most middle-class men would take upon themselves."

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?