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review 2017-09-20 03:16
Boy howdy. Longmire looks to the past and shakes up his present.
The Western Star (A Longmire Mystery) - Craig Johnson

In the last novel, An Obvious Fact, Johnson plays with lines and themes from Sherlock Holmes while letting us get to know that very important woman in Henry Standing Bear's life while Walt solves a murder. In this book, Johnson plays with Murder on the Orient Express while letting us get to know that very important woman in Walt's life while Walt solves a murder. It struck me while reading that as large a shadow that Martha Longmire cast over the books (particularly the first few), we really don't know much about her. We don't learn that much about her, really, but we see her interact with Walt and Henry -- and you walk away with a much better sense of her as a person, not her as the giant hole in Walt's life.

 

How do we get this sense? Half of the novel takes place shortly after Walt returns to the States after his time in the Marines, and he's been employed by Lucian as a deputy for a couple of weeks. Lucian is attending the annual meeting of the Wyoming Sheriff's Association, and he brings Walt along. This meeting takes place on The Western Star, a passenger train. Shortly after boarding, Walt meets one Sheriff who is convinced that one (or more) of his fellows is murdering people across the state (sort of a Dexter-vibe to the motive), and he needs someone with fresh eyes and a lack of knowledge of the Sheriffs to help with his investigation. This would be Walt, naturally.

 

Meanwhile, in alternating passages/chapters set in the present, Walt is in Cheyenne for a highly politicized parole hearing (that becomes something a little different) to keep this particular killer behind bars. Johnson's very good about not tipping his hand about the killer's identity until Walt uncovers it. While doing so, he stays with Cady and his granddaughter, and annoys some pretty powerful people in the state.

 

I found the Walt on a Train story entertaining more than intriguing, but the final reveal was well done and made me appreciate it all the more. But while I wasn't that into the mystery, I really enjoyed watching Deputy Walt and Sheriff Lucian do their thing. It was sad watching Walt's idealism surrounding the societal/cultural changes that the 60's promised come into contact with the cold reality that humans take awhile to change. I was really intrigued by the present day story, on the other hand, and wished they could get into more of the details about the case, but it'd have been hard to do while keeping the identity of the killer under wraps.

 

The events that are revealed after the reveal (in both timelines) will leave fans unsure what to do with themselves until Walt Longmire #14 comes out. I have some thoughts about what that book will end up being, but I'll hold on to them for now. But it's going to be something we haven't seen before.

 

But this book? Very entertaining, illuminating and the whole time, it slowly but surely reels you in and sets you up for the biggest emotional moments that Johnson has penned to date. Johnson earned the 5th star for me in the last 13 pages.


2017 Library Love Challenge

Source: irresponsiblereader.com/2017/09/19/the-western-star-by-craig-johnson
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review 2017-09-18 19:03
Futuristic fantasy comic collection – violent and vengeful
Extremity Volume 1: Artist - Daniel Warr... Extremity Volume 1: Artist - Daniel Warren Johnson

 

 

This collection seems to take place in a future, possibly on Earth, where technology has mainly disappeared and the population are discovering it again. There is a massive conflict between two races and it's a tale of revenge with much bloody action, some monsters and flashbacks.

 

Although quite interesting, it's very colourful and reasonably well-illustrated but not all to my taste. It's quite good but nothing special. Interesting relationships are developed and, to some extent, these are the heart of the story.

 

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review 2017-09-12 04:25
The No. 1 Car Spotter
The No. 1 Car Spotter - Atinuke,Warwick Johnson Cadwell

A good companion series to Anna Hibiscus and good to read on its own. 

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review 2017-09-08 16:39
The Dream-Quest of Vellitt Boe by Kij Johnson
The Dream-Quest of Vellitt Boe - Kij Johnson

I really enjoyed this novella. It is in dialogue with a short story by Lovecraft, which I have not read, but you don’t need to read that to enjoy this. And fortunately for me, this is fantasy, not horror. It is set in a portal world clearly conceived as the stuff of nightmares, with monsters, shifting natural laws and an angry sky; if this were made into a movie the horror would be inescapable. But through the eyes of a protagonist who hails from that world, these are simply facts of life, evoking no fear or disgust.

Vellitt Boe is a professor at the Ulthar Women’s College. She had an adventurous youth before going to college and settling down, so when a student runs off to the “waking world” (ours), putting the college in danger, Vellitt sets out on a quest to retrieve her. It’s an engaging story, written in Johnson’s smooth-flowing style that makes the book feel as much like literary fiction as fantasy. The world is highly imaginative, brought to life with a texture that must be Johnson’s own. And Vellitt is an interesting and endearing character, with a quiet toughness and the good sense one would hope for from a middle-aged adventurer.

This could easily have been expanded to a full-length novel, and I’m unsure why it wasn’t: Johnson takes some shortcuts through the waking-world portion, and the end is really the beginning of something else, providing little resolution. But it succeeds in telling a good story, while responding to the sexism and racism that was apparently rampant in Lovecraft. Sometimes Johnson is quite pointed in this, in other places subtle: Vellitt is apparently a woman of color, but the only indication I saw was the description of her hair. And when she arrives in the waking world, she remarks on the large numbers of women there, a clever dig at male-created fantasy worlds populated overwhelmingly by men.

Overall, I definitely enjoyed and would recommend this, along with Johnson’s other works, particularly Fudoki. I haven’t seen a bad book from this author yet, and look forward to more!

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text 2017-09-04 21:10
August wrap up
What to Buy the Shadowhunter Who Has Everything - Sarah Rees Brennan,Cassandra Clare
The Last Stand of the New York Institute - Maureen Johnson,Sarah Rees Brennan,Cassandra Clare

3 books

The fall of hotel dumort

3 audio

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