logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Music
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
text 2018-06-15 07:25
Discover Dogri Application- A KVM Trust Techno Initiative

The Kunwar Viyogi Memorial Trust situated in Jammu, hometown of Dogra community, that works for the preservance and promotion of Dogri culture was established in the memory of Group Captain Randhir Singh, popularly known as `Kunwar Viyogi’ in literary circles.  For the dogri culture to survive, the language must be preserved first. The trust believes that language can be saved only if the youth accepts it, the younger generation can easily connect to today’s technological inventions  therefore the trust came up with a way to grab the attention of the youth, they have launched an application first of it’s kind, a dogri dictionary app by the name of Discover Dogri which also promotes dogri music

 

 

Discover Dogri App

 

Technological inventions are must for advancement of any initiative in today’s world. KVM trust works to help people understand the dogri language better, their application developed by the name of Discover Dogri, the app helps it’s users understand dogri language better, it has a rich dogri dictionary having both english and hindi translations of words, it also contains translated Hindi and English forms of some Dogri sentences.

As the name  suggests, the app lets it’s users discover dogri music and videos.

 

Dogri Music

 

Dogri music is still famous among the Dogra people, it is still played at cultural gatherings in the Dogra community, but soon it will disappear, the youth is unaware of the dogri rhythms,  people have forgotten the importance of inculcating the interest  of traditional and regional songs among their children, the importance of dogri music is getting diminished with time. The discover dogri app makes available the works of various reknowned  ghazal singers and dogra music for it’s users.       

 

 

 
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-14 09:23
Ecstasy
Ecstasy: A Novel of Alma Mahler - Mary Sharratt

by Mary Sharratt

 

Near the turn of the 19th century, Alma Schindler yearns to make her mark as a composer. Female composers are unknown at the time, though new possibilities for women are opening up. She marries Gustav Mahler, who insists she give up her music as a condition of their marriage.

 

I liked the writing voice on this one right away. Alma had such enthusiasm that I wanted to see her achieve her dream from the start. The story takes us through her life as a young girl, her first love and her relationship with her various family members, but especially with her music.

 

It's not all upbeat though. Alma sacrifices a lot for her marriage and it's inevitable that she will question her decisions as time goes on. Mahler himself is a challenge to deal with and it was an era when women were expected to suppress their own needs and be supportive of a husband. Alma is a naturally passionate and creative person and this state of affairs can only clash with her natural inclinations.

 

I enjoyed reading this, despite the unhappy parts. The narrative kept my attention, even if at times I wanted to shake Alma and tell her she was making some bad decisions.

 

The historical note at the end was as interesting as the story itself. Alma was a woman ahead of her time, though her unfaithfulness in her marriages would bring a lot of criticism. She weathered some difficult times and gave her love to some of the top composers of her time. Some of her own compositions can be found on YouTube and I couldn't resist having a listen after reading this story. I found her 5 Lieder for voice and piano pretty amazing and can only imagine that if her music had been supported earlier in her life that she might have been recognised in history as one of the great composers herself, rather than just a shadow of her husband's accomplishments.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-11 13:21
"Bone Music" by Christopher Rice - I can't cope with this
Bone Music - Christopher Rice

"Bone Music" is original, well-written, emotionally engaging and very very threatening. It is all the things I want in a thriller but I can't continue with it.


I was only 11% through this book when I set it aside, intending to get back to it when my mood lifted. That was three months ago and I haven't been able to bring myself back to it.


I suspect that this will end up being a popular series with a remarkable heroine. The obstacle for me is that I'm at a point in the story where a woman who has survived childhood abduction and abuse, commercial exploitation by her father and all the nastiness associated with public notoriety in this peck-me-to-death-on-Twitter threaten-me-on-Instagram age and who has gone on to build a safe space for herself, is about to have that space violated with the help of those who should be protecting her.


It's a series. She's the main character. So she must survive this also. At the 20% mark, there must be a twist that sets her on a new path.


The problem is that this mindset, this careful planning of violation and destruction, revolts me. It's too real. Too common. I don't want it in my head, especially when it's placed there by someone who writes as well as Christopher Rice.


I'm reluctantly adding this to my DNF pile. The good thing is that it's taught me that there are some plot devices that I need to avoid. I'll take a look at Christopher Rice's other books and see if there is something there that will allow me to enjoy his obvious talent.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-03 18:06
Absolutely On Music - Conversations between Seiji Ozawa & Haruki Murakami
Absolutely on Music: Conversations with Seiji Ozawa - Haruki Murakami,Jay Rubin,Seiji Ozawa

As Duke Ellington once said, “There are simply two kinds of music, good music and the other kind.” In that sense, jazz and classical music are fundamentally the same. The pure joy one experiences listening to “good” music transcends questions of genre.

 

I studied at Tanglewood during summers as a teenager when Seiji Ozawa was conductor of the BSO. The amazing thing about him was that he had no real requirement to deal with Tanglewood kids, yet he did. It didn't surprise me at all many years later when he started both an orchestra and a school for the younger musicians of the world. He is brilliant, patient and an excellent teacher. I enjoy reading or listening to conversations between smart people in general, and this book hits on many cylinders. 

 

While Murakami says he's an amateur, his words often feel like music (even in translation.)

Haruki Murakami is well known for his love of music. He sticks a Beatles reference in nearly every book and there are always myriad musical references. So it wasn't that shocking to learn that he and the Maestro are fast friends.

 

One thing I learned early in my own mostly amateur musical life is that music happens and it's gone instantly - you have to experience it all in the moment and find an effective way to communicate about it. This is often why teachers and students have their own special language. My teacher used to tell me to sing like green velvet. Why? Because I told him I thought a certain singer sang like green velvet. That's fine, but what about when you want others to understand? This is the magic Murakami and Ozawa make.

 

It's hard for me to point out how very high the wall is that separates the pro from the amateur, the music maker from the listener. The wall is especially high and thick when that music maker is a world-class professional. But still, that fact doesn't have to hamper our ability to have an honest, direct conversation. At least that's how I feel about it, because music itself is a thing of such breadth and generosity. Our most important task is to search for an effective passageway through the wall - and two people who share a natural affinity for an art, any art, will be sure to find that passageway. 

 

It's unsurprising when the "interlude" about music and writing comes early in the book and Murakami explains patiently to Ozawa about rhythm in writing. It sort of shocked me that Ozawa hadn't noticed this on his own. He reads a ton of scores, and he works very hard, so maybe he just hadn't thought about it? He readily admits to being a horrible student, and I doubt he reads much beyond scores when he's working.

 

It's a series of conversations between the two masters - complete with markers for which one is talking. (Audio book would be great, but I don't know if one exists.) They talk about a few pieces in deep detail and the range of music covers everything from the blues to opera and Japanese music. They also talk about record collecting and teaching in lovely chapters. I'm pretty sure my enjoyment had to do with the fact that I knew the music they discussed well, and I'm not sure whether others would like it as much if they didn't have a familiarity and curiosity about both the men and the subject. Their fun and mutual respect nearly shines off the page, and I enjoyed it a lot.

 

Chapter Titles:

Mostly on the Beethoven Third Piano Concerto 
On manic record collectors 
Brahms at Carnegie Hall 
The relationship of writing to music 
What happened in the 1960s 
Eugene Ormandy's baton 
On the music of Gustav Mahler 
From Chicago blues to Shin'ichi Mori 
The joys of opera 
In a little Swiss town 
"There's no single way to teach. You make it up as you go along."

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-05-23 02:45
What's that joke about a gorilla and a typewriter?
The Murderer's Ape - Jakob Wegelius

I love a good Swedish to English translation (except for that one time I attempted Wallander) so I thought that The Murderer's Ape by Jakob Wegelius would be no exception. However, I cannot unequivocally state that I loved this book...or that I loathed it. The book is told from the standpoint of a gorilla who has been christened Sally Jones. She's been around humans her entire life and therefore not only understands what they are saying but can read as well. She's a gifted engineer who the reader discovers has the ability to figure out most mechanical devices be they accordions or airplanes. (This is integral to the storyline.) Her best friend is a (human) man she refers to as Chief and who took her on as a partner when he got his own ship. But all of this was before they ran into some trouble. Without giving too much away, the two are separated and Sally is forced to adapt in order to survive. At its heart, this is an adventure story with a lot of drama. What I enjoyed were the illustrations which were done by the author and accompanied the heading of each chapter as well as a gallery of character portraits at the very beginning. Some of the issues I had with this novel were in its dealings with race, religion, and ethnicity. It was hard for me to pinpoint if the problems I had could be explained by viewing it through the lens of the time in which the novel took place but I found them unsettling nonetheless. Overall, I wasn't totally blown away but I wouldn't throw it out of an airplane door either. 4/10

 

Source: American Library Association

 

Examples of the illustrations. [Source: Playing by the book]

 

 

What's Up Next: Golda Meir: A Strong, Determined Leader by David A. Adler

 

What I'm Currently Reading: The House With a Clock in Its Walls by John Bellairs

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?