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Search tags: Neil-Gaiman
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review 2017-03-29 18:09
Not Quite as Good as Volume 1
The Sandman, Vol. 3: Dream Country - Neil Gaiman,Malcolm Jones III,Kelley Jones,Colleen Doran

I did like this, but thought that it was a bit all over the place. I only really liked one issue and that was the one dealing with Death and the woman who was not a woman, Rainie. There seemed to be no connection between these issues and I thought that the issue ending on scripts of whatever for this volume was boring. I just skipped all over that. 

 

"Calliope" was a great story and we find out more about this Muse and her relationship with Dream. I liked the idea of Dream having a son though what was being done to Calliope all in the name of writing was terrible. I think that the authors in that one got off way too easily. This story starts before Dream is imprisoned and then escapes. 

 

"A Dream of a Thousand Cats" I think my cat would enjoy this story. I did like how we get to see Dream as a cat though. Still creeped me out with the all knowing look in his eyes. 

 

"A Midsummer Night's Dream" Well this turned sinister as hell in a quick shake. We have seen the relationship between Dream and Shakespeare in volume 1 so I am going to assume he keeps showing up. It was an interesting idea that I will admit to being slightly bored a bit.

 

"Facade" so I had to look up the character of Rainie since I had no idea who the heck she was and what her deal was either. She's interesting, but what was really interesting to me is that she is thousands of years old and she really wants to die. She's sick of merely existing and having no true face anymore. I did laugh though when she goes to lunch with an old friend and her fake face mask falls into a plate of spaghetti. Rainie ends up meeting Death who talks to her about the end of all things which was actually moving. Great ending to this issue. 

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review 2017-03-29 15:39
Really Enjoyed This Prelude
The Sandman, Vol. 1: Preludes and Nocturnes (The Sandman, #1) - Neil Gaiman,Malcolm Jones III,Sam Kieth,Mike Dringenberg

There really is not much to say besides how much I loved this graphic novel from beginning to end. I am glad that I just went and bought the first three novels. My library didn't have this copy, but also the one I read (volume 2) was much older and with these new editions I bought, I can see a lot easier while reading. 

 

In "Preludes and Nocturnes" I get to see how Dream got locked away and how that impacted the world. I wish now that I had read this volume before volume 2 since now certain things seem really cruel (i.e. the whole thing with Nada).

 

Through a spell a group of people manage to imprison Dream (ie The Sandman) and eventually he is able to escape, but damage has been done. The world has dealt with a sleep sickness and Dream being locked away has actually affected more things than even he knows.


Volume 1 really just showcases Dream going forth and trying to find his sandbag, helmet, and a ruby.

 

We get to follow Dream as he meets with characters like John Constantine, Etrigan the Demon, Morningstar (Lucifer), his sister Death, and even characters from Batman via Arkham Asylum. 

 

The writing was great though some parts of the book were gross (speaking of when John lays eyes on his ex-lover and he finds out what has became of her). We get to see that Dream can be cruel and also compassionate at times. 

 

I really loved the colors and graphics in this one a lot. The story flowed perfectly from issue to issue to the end. I think my favorite part honestly was when Dream and Death went on a little tour. 

 

I can see why this is such a favorite with so many people. 

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text 2017-03-28 23:45
The Graveyard Book - Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman’s novel The Graveyard Book tells the story of a little boy named Nobody Owens, or “Bod” for short, who was not raised under normal circumstances. After wandering from his crib in the middle of the night as a baby, he unknowingly escapes from a murderer in his house. The murderer is still on the loose throughout the course of the novel, and he is in search of Bod. While he is growing up, he is raised in a graveyard by ghosts who educate him on how to protect himself from the man who is out to kill him. You may be thinking by this point: why would anyone consider this to be a children’s book? Surprisingly enough, the book is an amazing story for young readers! Bod demonstrates courage throughout the novel, never allowing the man who wants to kill him to succeed with the job. The book’s Lexile reading level is 820L, and it is recommended to be read by students in higher grades like fourth and fifth grade. In my classroom, I would want students to form book groups to read the novel. I would want each student in the group to have a job to do with the book, and each group would get to engage in their own discussions about what they think. I would also want the students to analyze how Gaiman appeals to his reader’s senses through his strategic use of imagery.

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review 2017-03-26 21:15
Review: The Graveyard Book
The Graveyard Book - 'Dave McKean',Neil Gaiman

I really enjoyed The Graveyard Book while I was reading it.  The story and characters held my attention and it was a short, fast read.  Having finished it, I do wish there had been more meat to it.  The story had a reasonably satisfying if bittersweet end, but there were things that could have been fleshed out better and I wish the book had a sequel or two.  I’d really like to see the characters again and find out what happens next for them.  It feels like I was with them for too short of a time.

 

The story begins just after the parents and older sister of the main character, Nobody, have been murdered.  Nobody is a toddler when the book begins, oblivious to what’s going on, and the only reason he isn’t murdered with the rest of his family is because he has a tendency to escape his crib and wander off.  Since the murderer left the door to the house open, Nobody is able to wander out of the house and up the hill to a graveyard where he’s protected and raised by the dead who inhabit the graveyard.  The author was inspired by The Jungle Book, which explains the title.

 

One particular complaint I have now that I’ve finished is that the underlying motivation for the murder wasn’t explained sufficiently at all.  We were given an explanation, yes, but it’s one that brings up more questions than it answers.  There were also great secondary characters in this book, and I wish we had seen more of them and learned about them in more detail.  That’s really my only complaint with this book.  I really enjoyed it, but I was left wanting more.

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review 2017-03-24 19:40
Wonderful and Exceptional
Norse Mythology - Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman’s Norse Mythology was exactly what I needed. The real world has been bumming me out lately, so this was the perfect escape that I needed.

 

As I mentioned in my previous update, I knew very little about the myths of Odin, Thor, Loki, etc. The little bit that I did know comes from the comics, and just recently seeing some of the Marvel superhero movies.

 

Knowing that this has Gaiman’s fingerprints all over it, I couldn’t resist. I figured this would be a great way to introduce me to their world. And I was right. The tales in this book feel like a whole novel when you read them all in order, yet some in here are so entertaining and well done that they can stand on their own. He gives you a little background on the main players, setting, and so on at the very beginning of the book without hammering you over the head (see what I did there? eh? eh?) with endless amount of details to slow it all down. He gives you enough to get the feel of it all.

 

Some of my favorite tales in here were “The Treasures of the Gods,” “The Master Builder,” “Freya’s Unusual Wedding,” “Thor’s Journey to the Land of the Giants,” and “Hymir and Thor’s Fishing Expedition.” They’re all good, but those are my favorites. (Try reading/listening to "Freya's Unusual Wedding" without ever cracking a smile or laughing...)

 

If you listen to audiobooks, then I highly recommend getting it for this. Neil Gaiman once again delivers a flawless performance. If you’ve listened to his readings before, then you know you’re in for a treat.

 

These stories are filled with excitement and humor. And they can also get rather dark. I loved this journey that Gaiman takes you on. The only real bummer was finishing it so quickly. I never wanted it to end.

 

I know it’s early, but right now Norse Mythology is my favorite book of 2017. Even if I do read something else that takes its place, it’ll remain on my list of favorite reads of the year. A winner in every way.

 

5 stars

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