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review 2017-10-24 04:35
The Truth Comes Out
Wonder Woman Vol. 1: The Lies (Rebirth) - Liam Sharpe,Greg Rucka

This was a very good rebirth/reboot of Wonder Woman. It introduces a character who I would consider Wonder Woman's arch-nemesis, although their relationship is very complicated, Cheetah aka Barbara Minerva. Also, Steve Trevor plays a big role. I loved the artwork. While nice, the cover art doesn't live up to the wonderful illustration inside the book. Greg Rucka is an excellent writer, and his skills are beautifully displayed in this volume. His understanding of what makes the characters tick is evident. He gets Diana, Steve and Barbara. He also examines our society in which the lives of girls and women are disregarded as not valuable, especially if they don't serve some usefulness. Barbara's character arc shows the damage that a misogynistic culture can do to a person. I also liked how this volume delves into the Greek mythology aspects of Diana's heritage. Her father is not who she thought he was. She also realizes that the Amazons have kept secrets from her. This leads to her sense of disillusionment. Also this book explores Diana's relationship with Steve. Although I not-so-secretly ship Diana and Bruce, WonderBat, I like her and Steve together. I think the problem is that Steve is a soldier and is entrenched in the human world, whereas Diana is immortal and pretty much a demigoddess, which puts a time limit on their relationship, and they're still trying to figure all out that out. I'm pretty happy with this first book in the Rebirth series of Diana. This is the best Wonder Woman comic I've read so far. Looking forward to reading more.

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review 2017-10-24 03:53
Diana of Themyscira, Earth One
Wonder Woman: Earth One Vol. 1 - Grant Morrison,Yanick Paquette

This was kind of weird. It was a skewed version of the Wonder Woman origin story, but instead of their patron goddess being Hera, it's Aphrodite. You can imagine how that could change a few things. It has a lot more overt sapphic tones than I've seen with Wonder Woman (but hardly surprising or shocking). I mean its a Utopian all female society, so why wouldn't the women pair up together as partners and lovers? I was fine with that. I think some of their rituals were on the verge of kinky if I'm honest. I've always been leery of sex and violence together thought.

I did like that Steve Trevor was black in this version. The relationship that Diana has with him is undefined. Since Wonder Woman has a lover already, I wasn't sure that there were any romantic undertones in her relationship with Trevor as it was written.

When Diana comes to the world of men, she is portrayed as very dominant with an edge of cruelty. I didn't love that about her characterization. I don't see Diana as being that kind of person.

The storyline where she encounters the sorority girls on a wild spring break trip and bonds with a particular girl was a bit odd. I know it was a way to group Diana and teach her the ways of the modern world. I didn't much care for it.

Honestly, I was glad this is Earth One. While I didn't mind the aspect of Diana being queer, and I liked that Steve was black, I didn't care for other aspects of the storyline. It wasn't terrible, so I would still give this three stars.

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review 2017-10-11 19:41
Origin
Origin - Dan Brown

What can I say? I'm a sucker for a Robert Langdon book (except for The Lost Symbol, but I don't think any of us were here for that...).

 

If you like the Robert Langdon series, Origin is more of the same. Occasionally Robert Langdon will be so obtuse you'll want to hit him over the head. The descriptions will be ridiculous (I don't think I've ever Googled anything Brown has describing and gone, "Ah, yes, you captured this perfectly." It's always more like, "What caricature were you looking at when you wrote this description?"). Nothing will happen until the end, and you will guess the twist at the very beginning (the twist is so obvious).

 

Brown talks a lot about religion and clearly did a lot of research for this book but was apparently too lazy to research any African religions at all. At the beginning he writes "an African god parting the clouds and lowering two humans to earth" after specifically naming the Christian God, Prometheus and Brahma. Come on, dude. Try harder.

 

I plan on fully forgetting the plot in the next week or so. I do this with every Dan Brown book I've ever read. It makes the movies more exciting.

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review 2017-10-10 07:08
Origin in Death by J.D. Robb
Origin in Death - J.D. Robb

The pioneer in reconstructive and cosmetic surgery, a Nobel Prize winner and veteran of the Urban Wars, Dr. Wilfred B. Icove is murdered in his office with a single, precise, stab to the heart with a scalpel. The suspect, a stunning young woman, is a ghost; her name and address is bogus and no one seems to know her.

Digging deeper into the saintly doctor's life, Lieutenant Eve Dallas suspect something nefarious. No one is this squeaky clean, and encrypted, coded files she finds just might prove her theory. Then the good doctor's son is murdered in the same way, and the perfect image starts to unravel.


This book makes you think. Not just about who is the baddie (are they really?) and who might be next, but once the motive is clear, a whole new picture forms. A picture, a (fictional) truth that really gets you thinking about ethics, morals, and how some people think they can play God and get away with it.
This story was chilling, but not in a gory, bloody way, but in a psychological way as it makes you contemplate human nature, the boundaries of science and medicine, and the lengths some would go to create perfection.

It was jarring, chilling, engrossing...Even though, the ending was a bit over-the-top science fiction-y and mad scientist-y.

There was little drama on the personal front, with only Eve and Mira butting heads over the medical, scientific and ethic dilemma of the case. On the happier side, there were the holidays, with Roarke inviting his newly-found family over for Thanksgiving, where his unnatural nerves and his family's descent on the household offered a few moments of levity to the otherwise rather dark and brooding story.

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review 2017-05-21 15:12
Audio Book Review: Treasure of the Dead
Treasure of the Dead: A Dane and Bones Origin Story (Dane Maddock Origins) (Volume 9) - David Wood,Rick Chesler

*I was given this review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

In 1715 a ship full of treasure has been pushed off course with terrible storms. El Senor San Miguel runs onto land. When one of the crew makes land, he is horrified by what he finds limping on the beach.

Bones agrees to go on treasure hunting in the vast ocean with Maddock and has the first spot in mind. Bones had received a call from a dear friend of his when she received information from a cousin that's been found dead, mauled by animals. Maddock and Bones will quickly learn that trouble follows them whether in the service or on their own hunting treasure.

Jeffrey has voiced all the stories in this world with these men, and he is with us again. Jeffrey has become the voice of Maddock and Bones and all friends they interact with. The best part, I feel as the personality and tone given to Maddock and Bones fit the people written in words. For some reason Bones feels natural, but he's probably my favorite of the two. lol. Jeffrey never gives away a feel that something is coming, he adds just enough tension to the story by keeping in the here and now. This leaves me feeling comfortable with the characters but knowing with the writing of David and Rick that something is coming, I'm just waiting for it.

In the beginning we see a glimpse of a different side of Maddock and Bones. They left SEAL just months ago, and both are struggling adjusting to civilian life. Bones seems to be worse in a different way than Maddock, needing a release for pent up frustration. I like seeing them struggle after their life has been SEAL for so long. The life they lived is completely different than how they are to live now. Maddock shows up to ask Bones to help on a treasure hunting expedition, something they know how to do but less dangerous for their lives. These two never lose their great humor that makes me smile even in the tough times.

This is a slower start in the way of action for Maddock and Bones. But the authors strategically write in sections, as they are known for, with other characters. The events of the other characters then lead to our guys arriving, and things don't go as smoothly as it should, which could be to Bones and Maddock's liking. Well, maybe just Bones. They do enjoy their danger.

We see Bones flirting, as usual but with someone that he has some past with. The friend that contacted Bones is/was more than a simple friend. She and Bones have history together.

I always enjoy getting to spend any hour with Maddock and Bones. Their banter always brings a smile to my face while their adventures make my heart race. I enjoy the twist to the history that's created, a twist with a slight paranormal feel to it, as we go on the expedition not knowing what we'll walk into yet knowing it's going to result in danger and action.

This book is shorter in length, as audio it's just shy of 5 hours. The authors keep the story to the point of action, where we learn details of what we are looking for which leads eventually to troubles for our guys. We don't waste time getting from one point to the next as long as there is nothing extraordinary happening.

When things start to come out in the end, it all happens fast. Maybe a bit to fast, but that's the way it washes out in the end - all at once.

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