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Search tags: P.G.-Wodehouse
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review 2017-08-02 03:36
My Man Jeeves by P. G. Wodehouse (audiobook)
My Man Jeeves - P.G. Wodehouse,Simon Prebble

This is a collection of short stories, mostly featuring Jeeves and Wooster in America but with a few of Wodehouse's other, older stories thrown in. My favourite story (Helping Freddie) features the scene where the two bachelors are taking care of a young child (there's a story behind that as well) and after managing to get the kid undressed for bed, they prod the pool of assorted clothing items and realize it'll be absolutely impossible to get the kid dressed again without help.

 

Simon Prebble as the narrator is great, as usual.

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review 2017-07-07 00:31
A Plum Novel
Stiff Upper Lip, Jeeves - P.G. Wodehouse

Few writers can raise a smile to the lips after just one paragraph and have me snortling by the end of the first page. But then, P.G.Wodehouse remains an exceptional talent and in Wooster & Jeeves he created a rare literary tonic. Described by the Society (UK) bearing his name as “the greatest humourist of the twentieth century”, Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse (affectionately elided to ‘Plum’ by friends and family) has also retained the capacity to lift spirits into the new millennium. Clearly he was a writer of his time, replete with well-defined British social strata of the 1920's and 30's, but it is surely his ability to lampoon the elite classes and etch caricatures such as Bertie Wooster and Aunt Dahlia into the national consciousness, which is his greatest legacy.

 

In this short novel, against his better judgement, Wooster is lured to Totleigh Towers, Gloucestershire, home of Sir Watkyn Bassett, to rescue the faltering engagement of long-term friends ‘Gussie’ Fink-Nottle and the daughter of the host – Madeline. This is not entirely an altruistic act, since Bertie has every reason to believe that should the betrothal not be realized, he may be expected to step into the breach in Madeline’s marital prospects. This is consequently a matter of paramount concern to Bertie, dwarfed only by the abject horror such a turn of events would visit upon Sir Watkyn!

 

Thus, the familiar entourage is transported to the country, where ‘Gussie’, ‘Stinker’ Pinker, Roderisk Spode, ‘Stiffy’ Byng, Emerald Stoker, et al proceed to dispense the farcical social carnage, which generally accompanies their ludicrous interactions. And once again it falls to that paragon of calm, Jeeves (Bertie’s valet) to divine a course to preserve his employer’s bachelor status and simultaneously settle a whole series of potential disruptions. A wondrous spin through something akin to the Hatter’s tea party, but what a great time is to be had in this company!

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review 2017-03-16 05:38
Jeeves and the Impending Doom
Jeeves and the Impending Doom and Other Stories - P.G. Wodehouse

This is one of the little Pocket Penguin editions that contains two of Wodehouse's Bertie and Jeeves short stories.  Bertie and Jeeves is a little bit hit-and-miss with me; some of them come off hilariously but some feel like they go too far in relying on outright stupidity for the comedy.

 

Both of these stories veered towards the latter; they were both amusing, with Jeeves, as always, coming out on top.  In Jeeves and the Impending Doom he gets a bit of revenge on Bertie too.  

 

Jeeves and the Song of Songs was the winner for best dialogue; the exchange between Bertie and Aunt Dahlia made me chuckle.

 

Wodehouse is pretty much always on my TBR in some form or another because he can always be counted on for excellent and lighthearted writing.  

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review 2017-02-19 18:44
Sebastian Faulks takes some P.G tips
Jeeves and the Wedding Bells - Sebastian Faulks,Julian Rhind-Tutt

Sub-titled "a homage to P.G. Wodehouse", as a lifelong fan of the late,great man one can imagine that it must have been both an honour and a distinct challenge for Sebastian Faulks, to be invited by the Wodehouse estate to write a new Jeeves and Wooster novel. No pressure....though given that Faulks has similarly delivered a new James Bond novel (see my review of "Devil May Care") in the style of Ian Fleming, one cannot doubt the chameleonic qualities of this fine contemporary writer. Still, as a longstanding fan of Wodehouse myself, I also came at this book with a certain degree of trepidation and a wistful hope for more than a pale imitation of a Wodehouse original. I needn't have worried. Faulks has successfully woven the classic ingredients into a wonderfully comic plot, which sees Bertie and Jeeves revisit a glorious heyday. Indeed, if imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, there can be no finer accolade than to suggest this belated addition to the catalogue of J&W stories sits very comfortably alongside the originals, with deft brushstrokes that so clearly simulate the master. 

 

Since the TV series, in my imagination, Stephen Fry and Hugh Lawrie inevitably play the starring roles and the dialogue is crafted to fit their honeyed tones seamlessly. However, it is the quintessentially English nature of the farce, threaded through the frailties of the upper classes, which provides such a familiar platform for the many slapstick moments. The affable Bertie Wooster, big of heart, but none too bright, chaperoned by his patient, cerebrally-gifted manservant, who navigates through the choppy waters his master instinctively seems to steer towards. This book is stuffed with laugh-out-loud moments, which draw unashamedly on the antics of the Drones Club and references to familiar friends of old (Stinker Pinker, Boko Fittleworth, Bingo Little, Aunt Agatha, etc). Only the role swap at the core of this new tale breaks new ground with predictably hilarious consequences. If ever there was a book to brighten the cold winter evenings, this is it. Full credit to Mr Faulks for doing P.G. fans proud!

 

The shelf picture gives the impression that I ventured into the audio book, though only because the book cover was not an option in the drop-down. This book definitely is one for my actual shelf and one I expect to return to.  

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review 2017-01-31 04:09
Joy in the Morning, by P.G. Wodehouse
Joy in the Morning - P.G. Wodehouse

Originally published in 1946, Joy in the Morning is another breezy Jeeves and Wooster story. There are near-miss engagements, scheming, unlucky coincidences, shouting from elderly relatives, one burned down house, a hockey stick in the night, and lots and lots of witty language. I already knew from the series that everything always turns out well in the end thanks to the assistance of the ever helpful Jeeves...

 

Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type.

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