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Search tags: Performing-Arts
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review 2017-11-04 21:22
Enjoy the Dance (Dancing #2) (Audiobook)
Enjoy the Dance - Iggy Toma,Heidi Cullinan,Heidi Cullinan

Story: 3 stars

Narration: 4 stars

Overall: 3.5 stars

 

Turns out, waiting around for election results is just as boring in a book as in real life. The timeline for this book covers some important and groundbreaking moments for gay rights and equality, and while those are moments worth celebrating, I felt like the author got so caught up in chronicling every single one that she kind of forgot to tell a story, and that story was Duon.

 

Duon is the catalyst for this story, since Spencer finds the boy outside his apartment while Duon is waiting for Tomas, Spencer's across-the-hall neighbor, to come back from one of his three jobs. It's seeing Duon's predicament - beat up by his own cousins, kicked out by his grandmother, and homeless - that compels Spencer, a former foster care kid himself, to take Duon in and give him a home and family. Tomas, who is suspicious of the system for several reasons, is at first wary of Spencer, but comes to see his good qualities and eventually the two fall in love. And in between Spencer finding a family, Tomas trying to keep his family together, there's this kid that gets shuffled to the background for the majority of the story even though it's because of him that all of this is happening. It felt like the book was disconnected from itself, and while there was just enough to see that Spencer and Duon do care for each other, that relationship is really only ever given lip service. The same is true of Tomas's nieces and nephew. We're told they exist, as they're part of the reason Tomas has so many jobs, but we don't see them much at all.

 

I did like how the relationship developed between Spencer and Tomas though. Tomas's mom was a hoot (but oy, vey, that accent) and his father was pretty great too. There's a lot of Laurie and Ed in this one, and it was cool to see how they took care of everyone around them. I especially like how Laurie was able to calm down a nervous Spencer to convince him to learn tap dance. Seeing Spencer and Tomas let their guards down with each other was a treat, and they were able to understand each others' struggles and support each other despite their different backgrounds. 

 

The narration was as good here as in the first one. Iggy Toma has a new fan. :D 

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review 2017-10-31 02:14
Dance With Me (Dancing #1) (Audiobook)
Dance With Me - Heidi Cullinan

I don't know why I took so long to listen to this, but I really enjoyed it. Ed is trying to get his life back on track after a major injury sidelined him from playing football ever again, and Laurie (short for Laurence) has been hiding from performing while teaching at a community center. They're both at odds with themselves, and initially with each other until they rediscover their love of dance together.

 

I have a few minor quibbles with some of the early plotting, but overall I really enjoyed watching Laurie and Ed getting over their initial dislike of each other through dance and how they were able to help each other find that thing that's been missing in their lives. I liked that their challenges were believable and didn't just magically disappear because of love. Ed still has a serious neck injury. Laurie still has a long road before he's fully comfortable performing again. 

 

This was my first narration by Iggy Toma and he was great. I really loved the nuance he gave to his performance and the characters, and he captured them all well. He speaks clearly and with feeling, and makes the story come alive. I look forward to more stories read by him. 

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review 2017-03-09 01:36
Tipping the Velvet (Audiobook)
Tipping the Velvet - Sarah Waters

This was well-written and well-narrated by Juanita McMahon, just like Fingersmith was, but it didn't quite grab me the way Fingersmith did. Nancy King and her plights and travails through London on her quest to find herself, love and acceptance are all just a little too over the top for me. And talk about your coinkydinks! The last chapter especially was loaded with them. Maybe Waters was doing a final curtain call thing, but it was a bit too much, ya know?

 

I do like Nan's tenacity to keep going and never get knocked down no matter what life threw at her, and it was an interesting journey through London in the late 1800s, when things were still very dangerous for LGBT people. I didn't always understand why Nan made some of the decisions she made. They at times felt kind of generic, like she needed to make x decision so the story could go to y plot line, and the story just kind of meandered at points. 

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review 2016-09-10 09:15
WHAT THE EYE HEARS: A HISTORY OF TAP DANCING by Brian Siebert
What the Eye Hears: A History of Tap Dancing - Brian Seibert

WHAT THE EYE HEARS: A HISTORY OF TAP DANCING

Brian Siebert

Hardcover, 624 pages
Published November 17th 2015 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 0865479534 (ISBN13: 9780865479531)

also available for Kindle and ebook.

 

Seibert has magnificently researched Tap;  starting with original steps brought in with Irish Jigs, African Drums, and Appalachian Clogging in very early American society, then through Thomas Jefferson's plantation, Charles Dicken's visit to the Five Pointes Dance Hall, and more. He wonderfully brings us through the minstrelsy, the jazz age, to Taps comeback with television, then movies and Broadway. Seibert leaves nothing out, making this a long book (624 pages). He includes some great photos throughout. the book is definitely an entertaining read while giving us, the readers, a remarkable view at a true piece of American history. I would definitely recommend this to anyone who dances, enjoys music, and wants to learn more.

****I received this book in a Goodreads giveaway from Farrar, Straus and Giroux in exchange for a fair review.****

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review 2016-07-17 20:33
First Dance
First Dance - E. Davies

3.5 stars

 

A Canadian in London who works at a bookstore and hasn't quite settled into his new home yet. A Scottish pole dancer who memorizes Shakespearean sonnets to get over his nerves. This was adorakable and a sweet, easy read for a lazy Sunday morning.

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