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review 2017-11-21 16:06
fab 4 star read!
Lavender Fields - Claire Smith,Hot Tree Editing,Natalina Reis
Personal Review, I was asked to read this book by the author, that I write a review was not required. Sky meets Caleb when he falls too fast and can't stop in time. And falls for Caleb. Problem is, Caleb is the soul Sky has been sent to collect. Sky can't carry out his job so another angel is sent. But Sky keeps saving Caleb, and the other angel keeps coming. Can they figure out why Caleb has been targeted? I'm not one for instant professions of love, and it happens here, right in chapter one when Sky falls in love with Caleb. Now, it does kind of explain that away, since Sky falls in love often, but not to the depth of emotion he feels with Caleb. Still, its and instalove thing. Also, first person, present tense AND single point of view is not for me, because ...la.la.la.you know what I'm gonna say, and blah blah blah, hearing from everyone! BUT!!!! It's a nice book, a well written one by a new to me author. It does move at speed in places, and it gets a little . . . painful reading about what Samael does to Sky and his wings. Made me cry a little there! The heat level creeps up through the book. I did think it might actually end up clean but the boys do get their down and dirty on! Not explicit, but well written. Right level of heat for this book. It didn't seem the 200 odd pages its billed at, so a little longer than the usual hangover cure, but it landed in my queue just at the right time, so I'm filing it as such. A great little read. 4 stars **same worded review will appear elsewhere**

 

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review 2017-11-18 18:59
Where we were, and where we still are
Where the Girls Are: Growing Up Female with the Mass Media - Susan J. Douglas

This is another of those 10-star books.

 

My original review, on the transfer from GR, is here.  But it's not much.

 

When I went back to college in August of 1998, this was one of the texts for one of my classes.  According to the syllabus, we were assigned to read a couple of chapters.  Something about the book grabbed my attention, however, and I began to read it from the beginning.

 

Maybe it was the picture on the cover.  I remembered going to see the movie Where the Boys Are and I remembered being confused by it at the time.  But as soon as I started reading Susan J. Douglas's book, I was hooked.  I read almost non-stop.

 

 

Douglas is a bit younger than I, just as Hillary Rodham is a bit older.  We all grew up in that same era, however, and this was our reality.

 

I know where I was in, say, 1964, and I still have the diaries written in spiral notebooks to back me up.  I was never a cheerleader, and couldn't afford the latest fashions, but I absolutely did sleep on my face when my hair was in rollers.

 

My acquaintances today who are half a generation -- ten years, roughly -- older than I didn't go through the maelstrom we boomers did.  Virtually all of them were married and raising children by the time The Sixties hit.  They had come of age before the explosion of television, of rock 'n' roll, of The Pill. 

 

My acquaintances today who are half a generation -- ten years, roughly -- younger than I reaped the benefits of the maelstrom.  They came of age when birth control was available and acceptable, when the idea of having a career instead of a family was not shocking.

 

But there is still something somehow unique about those of us born in that relatively narrow window of (roughly) 1946 to 1956, and Susan J. Douglas captures it perfectly.

 

We were the first generation raised on television, and it had a profound effect on us.  Not just the comedy shows like I Love Lucy (which I personally hated because I thought Lucy was so fucking stupid) that seemed to remain a hallmark of the so-called Golden Age, but the news shows that brought events into the living room, everything from Hollywood fires to political campaigns to The War.  Television also gave us commercials that made us much more consumerist than adults who had read advertisements in newspapers and magazines.  Sponsors of children's shows could target us so much younger, and for so many more years.

 

I wrote in my earlier review that I needed then to reread the book.  I've reread parts of it many times over the years, and maybe a full reread is in order.  Then again, I actually lived through those times.  I still have the diaries, though there are few extant photos of the teen-aged me.  (And yes, the diarist was obsessed with boys and sex.)

 

Maybe that's why I tend to be a little less of an absolutist when it comes to girls and women and boys and men and sex.  Oh, not about whether no means no.  It does, and that is an absolute, even if it wasn't always taken that way.  Nor do I deny that there is such a thing as rape culture; there is, and it isn't yet going away.  But the ambiguities and double standards that girls grew up with in the 1950s and 1960s were the same ambiguities and double standards that boys grew up with then and which still pervade our culture to this day.

 

We all got mixed messages.  Some of us tried to sort them out.  But none of us escaped the culture that was all around us, and few of us were ever given the tools to analyze it, deconstruct it, resist it.  Is it worse today?  Probably.  And it's not going to get better if we don't understand how we got where we are today.  This book is a good starting point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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review 2017-11-15 21:18
Review of Culturally Proficient Leadership by Raymond Terrell
Culturally Proficient Leadership: The Personal Journey Begins Within - Raymond D. Terrell,Randall B. Lindsey

This was a tough book to get through. I admire and respect the dedication and knowledge the authors bring about culturally proficient leadership, but after a semester of reading about these issues, and my previous knowledge about them, I found this book to be very simplistic. When the authors shared parts of their autobiography to relate to the issues, I found the book very interesting and relatable. However, these passages were too few and far between. So for me, I would recommend this to someone starting out as a teacher or leader, but not for someone with any real knowledge background in the field.

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video 2017-11-09 10:23
Art of 4 Elements - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Mindful Being - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Conscious Parenting: Mindful Living Course for Parents - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Conscious Creativity: Mindfulness Meditations - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Tree of Life - Nataša Pantović Nuit

Spiritual Work Art of 4 Elements Book Poem by Nuit

Source: youtu.be/ULJmmK9leR4
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video 2017-10-31 11:16
Mindful Being - Nataša Pantović Nuit

Mindfulness Books TV Interview with Nuit

 

Yoga Science and Mindful Being Course.

 

Mindful Being Course is the Alchemy of Love Mindfulness Training. This Net TV Interview with the author Nataša Pantović Nuit is about Yoga as Science or Mysticism and mindfulness training that has 100s of spiritual transformation tools designed to help the explorer live his / her highest potential. Discover why practice Yoga and what are the tools yogis used 1,000s of years ago for the benefit of mind, body and soul. How does meditation and yoga fit into today's world? Is there a connection between the development of Eastern and Western Spiritual Science?

Source: www.youtube.com/watch?v=6TKkRg1rAwU
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