logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Photography
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
url 2019-01-24 07:21
American Southwest Art, Photography and More - Thomas Dodge's Great Southwest

At American Southwest, we provide some of the most amazing landscapes on the planet.  Its range of landforms offers an ever-changing display of incredible photography prospects. So, as many photographers through history have shown, American Southwest photography is a favorite. Get check it out!

 

Read more: American Southwest Art, Photography and More

Source: thomasdodgesgreatsouthwest.wordpress.com/2019/01/23/american-southwest-art-photography-and-more
Like Reblog Comment
url 2019-01-24 05:37
Great Southwest Natural Wonders & Culture Blog - Dodge Southwest

If you are a photographer coming to the region then, here America’s great Southwest is world renowned for its history, culture blog, and landscape. For 40 years, I’ve traveled the world photographing and writing for media, commercial and fine arts clients. Contact us!

Source: tdsouthwest.com/welcome-to-thomas-dodges-great-southwest
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-01-23 11:26
Shadows and Light, Michael Gray
Shadows and Light - David McLaughlin,Mi... Shadows and Light - David McLaughlin,Michael Gray

This slim volume makes accessible the photographic work of Bath and the surrounding area by one Rev. Lockey, taken circa 1850s. This is obviously a valuable service to amateur historians but it also shows Lockey to have had a keen eye for a good image - and not always the obvious one, either. Some of them show views of buildings that, whilst still existing, are not readily accessible to the public now. Others show scenes that have since evolved beyond all recognition. Some show a common Bath phenomenon; scenes that are readily recognisable from unchanged buildings but with streets that indicate the era they were made in. Here, it's unpaved roads, gas lamps and horse-drawn vehicles.

 

Lockey demonstrates that techniques common from the more recent eras of film photography started early: He painted negatives and took stereoscope pairs, for instance. (Exposure times were too long to capture fleeting cloud formations, so he would paint clouds in!) Stereoscopes, which allowed a 3-D effect, were a huge fad in the Victorian era.

 

The book makes good, large reproductions of the images - this is no mean feat, considering the technical challenges involved with dealing with very old prints and negatives at a time when digitisation was not a practical option.

 

Here's another gratuitous Bath pic: The Obelisk (one of three in the city) in Victoria Park. Since the version in the book was taken: lots of tree growth; paved roads; some-one stole a cannon!

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2019-01-23 09:51
Reading progress update: I've read 34 out of 64 pages.
Shadows and Light - David McLaughlin,Mi... Shadows and Light - David McLaughlin,Michael Gray

Lockey took many "stereoscope pairs" - slightly off-set pairs of images which, when viewed through a stereoscope, gave a 3-D effect. So this technique which was extraordinarily popular with the viewing public, is also much older than I thought.

 

Like everyone else with any interest in photography who's ever been there, Lockey took a photo of Abbey Churchyard, featuring the West Gate of the Abbey. Unlike my version (see below), Lockey's is taken from an elevated vantage, which I think must have been from the first floor of the building opposite the Abbey. Gas lamps but no other street furniture appear in the Churchyard area, unlike today.

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2019-01-22 16:06
Reading progress update: I've read 26 out of 64 pages.
Shadows and Light - David McLaughlin,Mi... Shadows and Light - David McLaughlin,Michael Gray

A great, less than obvious view of Prior Park Mansion, Ralph Allen's house built with Bath Stone from his own quarries at Combe Down.

 

I don't have any pics of Prior Park, mansion (now a school) or garden (well worth a visit, by the way), so here's more natural framing. (Taken from the Orange Grove, named after William of Orange who loved to stroll there.)

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?