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review 2018-09-20 09:07
Fallacious Reasoning: "The God Delusion" By Richard Dawkins
The God Delusion - Richard Dawkins


“Science can chip away at agnosticism, in a way that Huxley bent over backwards to deny for the special of God. I am arguing that, notwithstanding the polite abstinence of Huxley, Gould and many others, the God question is not in principle and forever outside the remit of science. As with the nature of the stars, contra Comte, and as with the likelihood of life in orbit around them, science can make at least probabilistic inroads into the territory of agnosticism.”

In “The God Delusion” by Richard Dawkins

Uhm...How can you do that Dawkins, when your knowledge of Statistics is so frigging fuzzy (I’m using a polite word here)?

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

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review 2018-09-16 13:50
∆×∆p×≥h/4π: “Fashion, Faith, and Fantasy in the New Physics of the Universe” by Roger Penrose
Fashion, Faith, and Fantasy in the New Physics of the Universe - Roger Penrose

“On the other hand, when we try deliberately to use the criterion of mathematical beauty in formulating our theories, we are easily led astray. General relativity is certainly a very beautiful theory, but how does one judge the elegance of physical theories generally? Different people have very different aesthetic judgments. [...] Moreover, the inherent beauty in a theory is often not obvious at first, and me revealed only later when the depths of its mathematical structure become apparent through later technical developments.”


In “Fashion, Faith, and Fantasy in the New Physics of the Universe” by Roger Penrose



Would it be logical if positive and negative charge represent two extra dynamic dimensions within our three dimensional Universe of continuous energy exchange? 
 
If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.
 
 

 

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review 2018-09-15 10:33
Turbocharged minds: “The Quantum Labyrinth” by Paul Halpern
The Quantum Labyrinth: How Richard Feynman and John Wheeler Revolutionized Time and Reality - Paul Halpern


“It’s worth a lot of miles to talk with you about anything and everything.”

John Wheeler referring to Richard P. Feynman, November 28, 1978 (Caltech Archives) in “The Quantum Labyrinth” by Paul Halpern


“His ideas are strange; I don’t believe them at all. But it is surprising how often we realize later that he was right.”

Richard P. Feynman referring to John A. Wheeler, in “Inside the Mind of John Wheeler”, 1986, in “The Quantum Labyrinth” by Paul Halpern


“To be normal or unconventional, that is the question. Is it better to be regular, predictable, and straightforward or bizarre, haphazard, and mercurial?”

in “The Quantum Labyrinth” by Paul Halpern



Do people in Quantum electrodynamics end their proofs with Q.E.D?

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

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review 2018-09-01 15:05
Newton Made Easy: "Newton's Principia for the Common Reader" by Subrahmanijan Chandrasekhar
Newton's Principia for the Common Reader - Subrahmanijan Chandrasekhar


"If a body impinge upon another, and by its force change the motion of the other, that body also (because of the equality of the mutual pressure) will undergo an equal change, in its own motion, towards the contrary part."


In "Newton's Principia for the Common Reader" by Subrahmanijan Chandrasekhar 



As a math and physics graduate back in the day, I applaud some of the Physics Professors choices when it comes to choosing the best books in Physics, and I also decry a lot of the works on that supposed imaginary list as being, in the grand scheme of things, quite trivial. I too would have assumed that importance and even profundity - if I dare use such a potent word - would carry some merit for non-fiction works, but, alas, i was quite mistaken it seems. To try to be fair though, as I said elsewhere on this blog, I think that the main problem for the arts and humanities mob is maths. As in their cluelessness about it. It completely underpins the natural sciences, and has to be mastered to at least some extent.

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

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review 2018-08-23 21:01
Physics and Computer Science for Laymen: "The Emperor's New Mind" by Roger Penrose
The Emperor's New Mind: Concerning Computers, Minds, and the Laws of Physics (Popular Science) - Martin Gardner,Roger Penrose


Penrose certainly has a generous idea of his readers' mathematical ability. It's a kind of running joke among Penrose-fans: he always starts his books by saying you'll find it tough going if you haven't got a 12th Year (in Portugal)/GCSE (in the UK) in math, but that he'll explain it as he goes if you haven't. Twenty pages later you're on Gödel and conformable geometry. He doesn't do it deliberately; he really does believe his books are popular science. How can you not love him? I purchased an on-line kindle edition of this book back last year via Amazon and it was more about bringing myself up to date (I read it for the first time in 1991 when the book came out), although such things are never truly current due to Theories being debated and tested for very many years within Scientific Realms. Roger Penrose's books are as stated often inclusive of more mathematical devises than many books aimed at more laymen realms, so I often regard them as perhaps Bridging that gap between Solid Science Headaches and Laymen 'I read an article and am a common law know-all expert'.

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

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