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review 2017-07-19 12:44
Resistance is Futile - Jenny T. Colgan

A bunch of maths nerds are brought together to solve a code. Connie is one of them, all of her colleagues are eccentric but none more than Luke and she finds herself attracted to him. 

 

There's murder, aliens, complex maths (that's more hinted at than stated), chases and a lot of nerding and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

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review 2017-07-13 12:13
For lovers of historical fiction and the French Resistance, a novel based on a true episode of cruelty and destruction that should never be forgotten.
Wolfsangel - Liza Perrat

This is the third book by Liza Perrat I have read, and it won’t be the last one. After The Silent Kookaburra set in Australia in the 1970s, I read the first book in the Bone Angel Series, Spirit of Lost Angels. (Read the review here). This is a series that follows the women of a French rural family through the generations, with big jumps in time. The name comes from a little bone angel talisman these women wear and inherit down the female line, together with a skill and talent for nursing (including knowledge of herbs and natural remedies) and midwifery. While Spirit of Lost Angels is set around the time of the French Revolution, this book follows the main character, Célestine (Céleste) through the difficult years of the German occupation of France during the Second World War and its immediate aftermath.

The book is again narrated by its protagonist, a young girl, eager to prove herself and to lead an interesting life away from her seemingly uncaring and cold mother, in the first person. I know some readers do not like first person narrations although they bring an immediacy and closeness to the proceedings, and help us understand better the main character (well, to the point she understands herself). This device also means that we share in the point of view and opinions of Céleste and we are as surprised by events as she is, as we do not have any more information than she does. I am fascinated by narrators, and although Céleste is not an unreliable narrator by design (she does tell things and events as she experiences them), her rushed and unthinking behaviour at times, her quick reactions, and her youth make her not the most objective of people at times. Of course, if readers cannot manage to connect with Céleste at some level, the novel will be harder to read, but she is a likeable character. She is young, impulsive, and enthusiastic. She is eager to help and will often do it without thinking about the consequences and risks she might be taking. She helps a Jewish family very early on, hiding them on the farm, even when she is convinced her mother will not be happy. She wants to help the Resistance cause and is frustrated by the assumption that she is incapable of making any meaningful contribution to the war efforts because she is a woman. She works hard to prove she can be as useful and courageous as a man and runs incredible risks to achieve her goals.

She is not perfect, though, and her youth is particularly well reflected in her romantic attachment to one of the German officers. As is often the case for young lovers, Céleste seems to fall in love with her idea of romance, having only very limited and furtive contact with the officer. If at first she tries to convince herself that she is only playing a part to gather intelligence (and even her sister Felicité encourages her to try and obtain information), soon things turn serious, proving that she is not as calculating and mature as she would like to believe.

Céleste develops throughout the novel, moving to the city, becoming a true resistance fighter, helping the war effort as a nurse, feeding the prisoners at the station on their way to the camps, spying and passing secret information, and becoming a determined and independent woman. She also proves her strength and determination and survives a terrible ordeal and severe losses.

The cast of secondary characters is also exemplary. Céleste’s family (except for her father that we don’t know much about) are well-drawn and fascinating. The relationship mother-daughter is one of the strongest points and it reminds us of the strong bonds and connections between women (not always straight forward) the series is built on. Felicité, Céleste’s sister, is an amazing character, brave beyond the call of duty and, as we learn later, based on a historical figure. Her actions and her courage are very touching. Her brother is strong and supportive, and also a member of the resistance, and we get to know her friends, the doctor, the priest, and to understand that a lot of the population supported the resistance (some more openly than others), although there were collaborationists there too.

The author creates a great sense of place and historical era. The language, the foods, the clothing, the difficulties of an occupied nation trying to survive and resist are vividly brought to life thanks to the detailed descriptions of the landscape and the events, that make us share in the experience, without burdening the novel with extraneous information. The research is seamlessly incorporated into the story and it reminds us of how close the events are to us and makes us reflect on historical similarities with current times. The style of writing is poetic at times (the descriptions of the forest, Céleste’s love for her home and her pendant…), dynamic and flowing, and it has psychological depth and insight too.

The novel is harrowing and realistic as it describes death and tragedy on a big scale. The events that took place in Oradour Sur Glane in 1944 (and that inspired the novel) are horrific and reading them in the first person helps us understand more fully the kind of horror experienced by the victims and also the survivors.

The ending ties all loose ends together and is perfect for the story.

This is a great book for anybody who loves historical fiction and is interested in the French resistance from a more human perspective. It personalises and brings the readers closer to the experience of the era, at the same time helping us reflect on events and attitudes that are all too familiar. If you prefer your history close, personal, and in the first person, this is your book.

 

 

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text 2017-06-29 00:33
Reading progress update: I've read 7 out of 208 pages.
Surgeon X: The Path of Most Resistance - Sara Kenney

the future may not be sound, from a medical standpoint. gonna be brave, and check it out...

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review 2017-04-23 04:33
Resistance series
Resistance - Carla Jablonski,Leland Purvis,Hilary Sycamore
Defiance - Carla Jablonski,Leland Purvis
Victory - Carla Jablonski,Leland Purvis

 

 

This is a great middle-grade graphic novel series on the French resistance during World War II. Kids play their part and there is danger, but it is not overwhelming. My son brought this series home from his school library. He loved it and wanted to share it with me. I love when he does that!!

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review 2017-04-14 00:04
ARC Review: Juvenile
Juvenile (Resistance Book 1) - Perrin Br... Juvenile (Resistance Book 1) - Perrin Briar

I received an ARC to give an honest review.

I have sat here and tried to write this review without giving anything way only to delete and rewrite multiple times.

We are introduced to Dana who is troubled teen. When she finds herself in the middle of an apocalypse she will stop at nothing to save her sister Max.
She ends up befriending a boy named Hugo, she doesn't believe he will be able to survive because of his weight and his loudness but it seems he may surprise her.
Hugo decides that he is going to hang with Dana and survive with her and help her find her sister which in this new world it seems a majority of people will only be looking out for themselves.
I will say this. There was one scene where I sat there with my mouth opened going oh wow the author went there with that one part. I kind of giggled a bit I will be truthful.
If you enjoy zombie books check this out. Is there gore of course you have to have it in zombie books.

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