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review 2018-04-26 22:30
FIGURES UNSEEN by Steve Rasnic Tem...
Figures Unseen: Selected Stories - Steve Rasnic Tem,Matt Godfrey

I just finished it and I'm going to need a little bit of time to collect my thoughts on all these stories. That said, this collection vaulted right past many others directly on ALL TIME FAVORITES list. 

 

More tomorrow when I post my review, but seriously? If you're a fan of horror and/or dark fiction, and you're not reading the work of Steve Rasnic Tem? 

 

You are missing out on some of the best stories in the genre. Period. 

 

 

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review 2018-04-25 21:19
Review: "Rocky Mountain Refuge" by Nicky James
Rocky Mountain Refuge - Nicky James

 

~ 4 stars ~

 

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text 2018-04-25 15:02
BOOK REVIEW - Damaged Beyond All Recognition

Damaged Beyond All Recognition (Infinity's Trinity Book 1)

 

Alan Felyk

Print Length: 361 pages

 

Publisher: Alan Felyk; 1 edition (January 1, 2018)

Publication Date: January 1, 2018

Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC

ASIN: B077VJGJCD

 

https://www.amazon.com/Damaged-Beyond-Recognition-Infinitys-Trinity-ebook/dp/B077VJGJCD

 

 

 

Reviewed by Dr Wesley Britton

 

I admit it. Alan Felyk has an imagination I simply envy. The tag line for his new Damaged Beyond All Recognition is “Extending the literary traditions of Kurt Vonnegut and Douglas Adams ...”  Vonnegut, certainly. Adams, well, from time to time. It’s certainly true that this novel is going to appeal to readers who like high-minded humor laced into a complex, layered yarn.

 

Three unusual protagonists anchor the proceedings.  First, there’s Paul Tomenko who is a famous writer chronicling events in the counter-culture in Colorado in the late ‘60s and early ‘70s. Suddenly, he finds himself traveling to and from God's library somewhere outside the Universe. That’s the current God, the less than omnipotent being in a long chain of less than omnipotent beings.

 

For example, there’s no longer an afterlife for humanity to ascend to. Humans can no longer access memories from their past lives in previous versions of the Universe or acquire new memories. So who can replace God when he dies as he is coming very close to that point?

 

It’s Paul who has to find the solution to this dilemma with the help of his two lovers, the genius genetic Maggie Mae Monahan and the Sci-Fi novelist Allie Briarsworth who intuitively senses events from the past and future.

 

Paul’s brain creates some unusual supporting players like the gatekeeper to God’s archives who is a doppelganger for Cher and the very helpful librarian who is a doppelganger for actress Katharine Ross. Clearly, these women came from Paul’s unfulfilled carnal wishes. Toss in Gronk and Grita, two six-year-old neo-Neanderthals who are the most intelligent humans on Earth due to reconstructed DNA. Did I mention the story includes traveling across multiple planes of existence or a species of aliens who want to obliterate humanity so they can become the supreme creations of the cosmos?

 

Metaphysics have rarely been treated with such originality or irreverence. This is entertaining science fiction with a cerebral framework, lively tone, well-drawn characters (with overly restrained sex lives, sad to say), and the unexpected on nearly every page. You should probably make a point of not missing this one as you too might be a figment of Paul Tomenko’s imagination. Wait till you find out where you’ve been. Talk about a Big Bang . . .

 

This review first appeared at BookPleasures.com on April 24 at:

https://waa.ai/z5mq

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text 2018-04-25 11:00
Facts About Me: Reviews

I read reviews. *ducks for cover* Some break your heart and others mend it. One of the first things an author has to do after publishing their first book is to decide if they're going to read reviews. It's hard not to be curious, but it's even harder if you end up reading something that hurts you. The best lesson I ever learned in publishing was never to reply to a review. It can only lead to disaster. Now, I just sit back, sneak a peek at them as they roll in after release and then I don't read any more, after that. I like to see the initial reaction, but try not to obsess about it, too much.

 

 

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review 2018-04-25 01:45
Review of "Lirael: Daughter of the Clayr" (The Old Kingdom #2; The Abhorsen Trilogy, #2) by Garth Nix
Lirael: Daughter of the Clayr - Garth Nix

This reader's personal opinion, ©2018, all rights reserved, not to be quoted, clipped or used in any way by goodreads, Google Play, amazon.com or other commercial booksellers* 

 

I'm glad I read this after Sabriel.  It's hard for me to give this one a star rating. From the first book, I was intrigued by the Clayr (seers in their own society) and what happened next with the Abhorsen, the Old Kingdom, etc.

 

It's a very good book that suffers from comparison to first in series. Seriously, this is a good fantasy genre book.

 

I'm not sure I completely warmed up to Lirael, though. I think my problem was that about the time I'd start to or the story got interesting, it would change. The library and the dog (avatar? nicer version of Mogget?) could really have gotten interesting on their own. So before that was Lirael as someone not yet finding her place with the Clayr. So after that was Lirael traveling to Old Kingdom to confront necromancer and join characters from the first book. Any of those three would have made a good book; putting all three in one book made it sort of the lite version. Didn't leave a lot of room for developing other characters, including Prince Sameth (son of Sabriel and a Touchstone, the h/H of first book) despite a lot of chapters from his POV. No romance, which worked well for this tale (particularly given some spoilers).

 

Lacked the intensity but more happened than in first book. No cliffhanger ending, but also no real surprises (and I'm usually easily surprised). Behind the necromancer and a lot of the still unresolved political machinations is a never revealed Big Bad. Which, while slightly disappointing, points to this possibly being a "filler" in the series.

 

I think I would have starred it higher or lower had I not expected more from a book about a Clayr librarian.


*©2018.  All rights reserved except permission is granted to author or publisher (except Penumbra Publishing) to reprint/quote in whole or in part. I may also have cross-posted on Libib, LibraryThing, and other sites including retailers like kobo and Barnes and Noble. Posting on any site does not grant that site permission to share with any third parties or indicate release of copyright.  

 

Ratings scale used in absence of a booklikes suggested rating scale:

★★★★★ = All Time Favorite 
★★★★½ = Extraordinary Book. Really Loved It.
★★★★☆ = Loved It.
★★★½☆ = Really Liked.
★★★☆☆ = Liked.
★★½☆☆ = Liked parts; parts only okay. Would read more by author.
★★☆☆☆ = Average.   Okay. 
★½☆☆☆ = Disliked or meh? but kept reading in hopes would improve.
★☆☆☆☆ = Loathed It. Possibly DNF and a torturous read.
½☆☆☆☆ = So vile was a DNF or should have been. Cannot imagine anyone liking.  (Might also be just an "uploaded" word spew or collection that should not be dignified by calling itself a "published book." If author is going batshit crazy in the blogosphere over reviews -- I now know why they are getting bad reviews.  Or maybe author should take remedial classes for language written in until basic concepts like using sentences sink in. Is author even old enough to sign a publishing contract or do they need a legal guardian to sign for them?)

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