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Search tags: Richard-Armitage
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text 2018-04-21 20:24
It's done. The shelf is made.

My Richard Armitage shelf.

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text 2018-04-21 18:54
Continuing my quest to own all things narrated by Richard Armitage...

I have added these to my collection:

 

FREE: Classic Love Poems - William Shakespeare,Edgar Allan Poe,Elizabeth Barrett Browning,Richard Armitage The BL book page says "free," but alas, it no longer is. Still, $3.95 to listen to Mr. Armitage read poetry to me is a small price to pay. Even if it is rather short.

 

The Bloody Chamber - Angela Carter,Richard Armitage,Emilia Fox This was just released in March and features not only Mr. Armitage, but also Emilia Fox. (Not, Emilia Pardo Bazan as BL changed it to when I added the book. Librarians, I submitted changes, hopefully, I did it right. *sighs*) Used a credit for this one.

 

Their Lost Daughters - Richard Armitage,Joy Ellis This is a pre-order, coming out at the end of May, and despite what the audible page says, this is actually the second in the Jackman and Evans series, at least according to what I've seen on both amazon and GR. I used a credit for this one as well.

 

You know, I have a shelf titled, "Because Tom Hiddleston, that's why," perhaps I need one for Richard Armitage as well...

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text 2018-04-08 18:19
My Sunday is already going well.
The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde - Robert Louis Stevenson,Richard Armitage

I was browsing on audible, and I stumbled across this book. It, apparently has been out since October and I somehow missed it. I was going to use a credit to buy it, but I was able to get it for $1.99 instead because I already own the kindle version.

 

I would listen to Richard Armitage narrate the phone book, so him narrating a story I enjoy? SCORE!

 

Secondly, I was able to add this edition to BL with no issue at all this time! WOOT!

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review 2018-02-25 22:26
Review: Wanderlust by Lauren Blakely
Wanderlust - Lauren Blakely,Grace Grant,Richard Armitage

Reviewed for Wit and Sin

 

I am completely in love with Wanderlust. It’s beautiful, romantic, sensual, and fun, with a whole lot of heart. Joy is, well, joyful. She’s immediately endearing and is so lively that she practically pops off the page. She’s the kind of heroine you want to be friends with and she just plain charmed the heck out of me with her attitude, big smile, intelligence, and her love of things like pink doors, hidden angels, and red umbrellas. It’s easy to see why Griffin fell for her and she for him. Griffin isn’t just a sexy hero (though that doesn’t hurt). He’s also playful, interesting, smart, and as likeable as Joy. Like Joy, Griffin is in Paris to start fresh; only he doesn’t plan to stay. He made a promise to his dying brother and fulfilling it means his time in Paris is almost up.

Griffin and Joy hit it off from the start and their interactions made me grin. Because they’re working together (she’s a chemist and he’s her interpreter), they try to resist the pull between them, which made the sexual tension all the more delicious. Their love story is absolutely wonderful because you see them become friends first and the fall from lust and friendship to something more is seamless. When they do give in to their mutual attraction, Wanderlust gets incredibly sexy. In bed and out, Griffin and Joy are a perfect match. Their love story is bright and exciting, but that doesn’t mean it or they lack depth. Both of them are fully developed, well-rounded characters. I feel like there’s no way to do them justice in this review because I cannot adequately express how happy these two made me. Their journey is one best experienced for yourself and I defy you not to fall in love with them.

Joy and Griffin are the heart of this book, but Paris itself is every bit as important to the story. Lauren Blakely does an incredible job of transporting readers to the City of Light – not to the famous sites we all know, but to the smaller shops, alleys, and hidden treasures. Griffin is British and Joy is from Texas, and the fact that neither of them are native Parisians added to the story. I was able to fall in love with Paris alongside Joy and the sheer romance of the setting had me sighing thanks to Ms. Blakely’s writing.

I listened to Wanderlust on audio and I highly recommend enjoying the book this way. Good narrators enhance already wonderful stories and I don’t think you can get much better than Grace Grant and Richard Armitage. Grace Grant perfectly captures Joy’s spirit, but it’s Richard Armitage (also known as John Thornton, Thorin Oakenshield, etc.) whose narration is to-die-for. He not only brings Griffin to life, but his voice is like melted chocolate and makes Wanderlust an aural delight.

I cannot recommend Wanderlust highly enough. It’s an utterly enchanting story with characters you care about and a romance that makes you laugh, swoon, and sigh. This is the first book of Ms. Blakely’s I’ve read/listened to and I cannot wait to glom up her backlist!


FTC Disclosure: This book was purchased by me. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Source: witandsin.blogspot.com/2018/02/review-wanderlust-by-lauren-blakely.html
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review 2017-12-30 23:19
16 Tasks of the Festive Season: Square 16 - New Year’s Eve / St. Sylvester’s Day: Prophetic Bells
The Chimes: A Goblin Story of Some Bells that Rang an Old Year Out and a New Year In - Charles Dickens,Richard Armitage

Well, well -- nothing like ringing in the New Year (albeit a day early) with Charles Dickens: What he did for Christmas in the story about the old miser Scrooge, he did again a year later for New Year's Eve with this story; which is, however, quite a bit darker than A Christmas Carol.  Once again, a man is swept away to see the future; this time, however, it's not a miserly rich man but a member of the working classes, a porter named Toby (nicknamed Trotty) Veck eeking out a living near a church whose migihty bells ring out the rhythm of his life -- as if Dickens had wanted to remind his audience that the moral of A Christmas Carol doesn't only apply to the rich but, indeed, to everyone.  Along the way, the high, mighty and greedy are duly pilloried -- in this, The Chimes is decidedly closer to Hard Times, Our Mutual Friend, A Tale of Two Cities, and Bleak House than it is to A Christmas Carol -- and there are more than a minor number of anxious moments to be had before we're reaching the story's conclusion (which, in turn, however, sweeps in like a cross breed of those of Oliver Twist and Oscar Wilde's Importance of Being Earnest).

 

Richard Armitage's reading is phantastic: at times, there are overtones of John Thornton from the TV adaptation of Elizabeth Gaskell's North and South, (or in fact, both John Thornton and Nicholas Higgins) which matches the spirit of the story very well, however, since workers' rights and exploitation are explicitly addressed here, too, even if this story is ostensibly set in London, not in Manchester.

 

In the context of the 16 Festive Tasks, The Chimes is an obvious choice for the New Year's Eve holiday book joker, so that it is going to be.

 

 

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