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Search tags: Samuel-R-Delany
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text 2017-11-30 15:50
November Wrap-up
Devil's Day - Andrew Michael Hurley
Captives of the Flame (The Fall of the Towers, #1) - Samuel R. Delany
Dark Carnival - Nancy K. Duplechain
Fools and Mortals - Bernard Cornwell
First Person: A novel - Richard Flanagan
Children's book: Moshe Comes to Visit: Fun Rhyming book about Overcoming fears and positive thinking - Tehila Sade Moyal,Fatima Pires
Ramses the Damned: The Passion of Cleopatra - Anne Rice,Christopher Rice
The Discovery of Witches - Hopkins, Matthew

Eight books finished this month and two more well in progress. An easy favourite among the above would be Fools and Mortals, but Cornwell is a great author. Dark Carnival gets the award for best indie and I've put her other two books on my ereaderiq list.

 

This was mostly a month for clearing Netgalley and fulfilling holiday Bingo reads. I have one and a half netgalley books still to finish and highly recommend The Toy Makers, which I'm halfway through! I also have the science book to finish for my Newtonmass square, but it's time travel so I'm enjoying that too.

 

I have some books put aside for this year's Christmas reads.  I'll post about those soon.

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review 2017-11-23 12:57
Captives of the Flame
Captives of the Flame (The Fall of the Towers, #1) - Samuel R. Delany

by Samuel R. Delany

 

Typical early 1960s science fiction.

 

"The Empire of Toromon had finally declared war. The attacks on its planes had been nothing compared to the final insult—the kidnapping of the Crown Prince. The enemy must be dealt with, and when they were, Toromon would be able to get back on its economic feet."

 

Add to this a radiation barrier that leaves a people isolated and an enemy called the Lord of the Flames and you're set up for epic battles and other fun geeky stuff.

 

This is considered the first of a trilogy, but quite honestly it didn't impress me enough to continue. None of the characters stood out for me and apart from an interesting contrast between the rich and the poor, the plot was fairly generic. There's also a mock-Arthurian Fantasy element in the young prince being kidnapped to be trained among the forest guardians to be a good king so the elements of a good story are there, but I found my mind wandering as I read. Somehow it just didn't grip me.

 

Very much a thing of its time.

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text 2017-11-12 19:41
Square 16: I've read 9%.
Captives of the Flame (The Fall of the Towers, #1) - Samuel R. Delany

"Read a book written by an author of African descent"

 

 

I don't usually note the racial group or ethnicity of an author. So, after checking books I already planned to read and looking at author pages, I actually Googled authors of African descent. Lucky for me, this author had been recommended in a science fiction group and I was able to get a copy from gutenberg. So far the book seems typical of the era. Not bad really.

 

 

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text 2017-09-20 19:37
I have no idea what's going on
Dhalgren - Samuel R. Delany

But I'm liking it.

 

Writing is also incredibly lyrical.

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text 2017-09-02 15:15
September Read: Dhalgren
Dhalgren - Samuel R. Delany

Somehow Samuel R. Delany managed to stay under my radar for most of my life.  Reading about him and his works, I feel like the fact that I have yet to read any thing by him is absurd.

In Bellona, reality has come unglued, and a mad civilization takes root A young half–Native American known as the Kid has hitchhiked from Mexico to the midwestern city Bellona—only something is wrong there . . . In Bellona, the shattered city, a nameless cataclysm has left reality unhinged. Into this desperate metropolis steps the Kid, his fist wrapped in razor-sharp knives, to write, to love, to wound. So begins Dhalgren , Samuel R. Delany’s masterwork, which in 1975 opened a new door for what science fiction could mean. A labyrinth of a novel, it raises questions about race, sexuality, identity, and art, but gives no easy answers, in a city that reshapes itself with each step you take.

This sounds exactly like a book I will love, and hopefully that proves true for the September Virtual Speculation pick.

Source: libromancersapprentice.blogspot.com/2017/09/september-read-dhalgren.html
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