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review 2018-11-17 16:14
How local women fought for their right to vote
Woman Suffrage and Citizenship in the Midwest, 1870–1920 - Sara Egge

The study of the women's suffrage movement in the United States has generated a considerable amount of memoirs, biographies, and scholarly histories. Yet for all of their variety, most of them adopt a predominantly national focus, which can often obscure the efforts by activists at the state and local level to win for women the right to vote. This is just one reason why Sara Egge's book is such a welcome addition to the historiography of her subject. Focusing on three rural counties in the Midwest, she describes the emergence of the suffrage campaign in the region and the different direction it took in the different states in the region.

 

For Egge, much of the context of the campaign was determined by the population trends within the region, which were shaped by two distinct groups of settlers: Yankee Protestants and immigrants from Germany and Scandinavia. Together they possessed certain assumptions about gender roles which defined a highly proscribed role for women in the public sphere. Yet as Egge shows, women soon used that ostensibly limited degree of involvement to argue for a far greater degree of involvement. Central to this was the participation of local women in the Women's Christian Temperance Union, which gave many women experience in public activism at the cost of alienating many immigrant voters. Though successive attempts to win for women the vote in the Midwestern states ended in frustration, the campaigns and arguments made in them helped lay the groundwork for their success at the end of the 1910s, when their long-argued case for their importance as citizens gained strength in an environment of progressivism charged by war.

 

By focusing on suffrage campaigning at the local level, Egge brings long-overdue attention to a vital aspect of the suffrage effort. While lacking the drama and glamor of the national campaign, she underscores the degree to which such efforts were key to the eventual success of the suffrage campaign in America. That this book serves as a reminder of this fact is just one reason why it should be read, as it spotlights the vibrant civic lives in rural communities in the Gilded Age Midwest, in which women played a vital role. Reading Egge's book helps to underscore that women have long played an important role in the public sphere, one in which the granting of the right to vote was merely an overdue acknowledgement of that fact rather than an inauguration of it.

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text 2018-11-14 23:36
Oh, crap!
Woman Suffrage and Citizenship in the Midwest, 1870–1920 - Sara Egge

Today I began reading Diarmaid MacCulloch's new biography of Thomas Cromwell. It's a book to which I had been looking forward to for awhile, and I had made it a point to carve out enough time to give it my full attention in preparation for my interview with MacCulloch himself next week.

 

Nevertheless, something was nagging me in the back of my head. A while back I had reached out to a historian named Sara Egge about featuring her book on women's suffrage in the Midwest. She responded positively, and I even received a copy of her book, but for some reason I didn't have an interview scheduled on my calendar.

 

Today I did what I should have done days ago, and I searched my account for our correspondence. Sure enough, it was there all right — we had agreed to do it this Friday! Now Cromwell is on the back-burner, as I'm scrambling to read Egge's (fortunately short) book in time for our interview. Clearly I need to work on my system.

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review 2018-10-29 16:57
desperately wanted to hear from Edmund!
Escaping Solitude (Escape Trilogy #2) - Sara Dobie Bauer
I was gifted my copy of this book, direct from the author, that I write a review was not required. Andrew takes Edmund back to civilization, to his home in New Orleans. Andrew's coven has some members who wish to harm Edmund, to take him away from Andrew and Andrew will not have it. To turn Edmund, Andrew needs an Elder so Edmund is let lose in the coven's library to find him. Then Andrew is called home to England, so the trip to find the Elder is put on hold. That is, til a terrible accident on board. Again, written only from Andrew's point of view, in the first person/present tense, same as book one. Knowing this going in, made it easier to overlook that personal quirk that I don't much care for books written as such. And of COURSE I wanted to hear from Edmund! There were several keys points along the way that I really needed to hear what he was thinking. Andrew introduces Edmund to some of his more baser pleasures, several of them, in the club with the red door, and oh that was such a surprise cos I did not see that one coming at me! So bloody hot! He also introduces Edmund to his coven's parties. But rather than Andrew go all ALPHA-protect-what-is-mine, it's Edmund who goes all don't-touch-what-isn't-yours on Felix, the one who touches Edmund. Oh of course Andrew wanted to rip Felix' head off for that, but he left Edmund stake the claim of Andrew, rather than the other way round. The trip home to England brought some more surprises, but also tragedy, when there is a storm. And we're left hanging! Cliff hanger, people, of the highest order! Not QUITE the one I was expecting, but still a massive one, that could still go either way! And I have to wait til Jan next year for the final part, and Lord is that gonna be a wait!! So, ONLY, only because Edmund doesn't have his say, because I think if he had, this may well have been a 5 star review... 4 stars

 

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review 2018-10-29 16:37
kinda creeps up on ya!
Escaping Exile (Escape Trilogy #1) - Sara Dobie Bauer
I was gifted my copy of this book direct from the author, that I write a review was not required. Andrew didn't know how long he'd been on the island, but it was a long time. When a ship wrecks on his beach, a scent pulls him to find Edmund, half dead from the wreck. But there are others who want Edmund, and they don't mean to save him. Andrew has to keep HIS monster at bay, along with those on the island, if he wants to keep Edmund safe. So! I'm in a bit of a quandary about this book! If you follow my reviews, you'll know I'm not a fan of books written in the present tense and first person. I don't know why I don't like them, I just don't. You'll also know, I will ALMOST always say I wanted to hear from the other main character, if a book is written from a single point of view. And thus: my quandary. This book is written present tense AND first person. Had this book been written from both Andrew AND Edmund's point of view, in resent tense/first person, I have no doubt, NONE at all, I would have dumped this book as soon as that became clear. But it's ONLY Andrew who has a voice here. And of course, at this point I'm gonna say I needed to hear from Edmund, because I really did! But HAD Edmund had a say, I might not have finished it! You see my problem?!?!?! Putting that fact aside, I really did enjoy these 80 pages of a vampire falling in love with his rescue, who in turn rescues him from his banishment. Andrew has been banished for killing one to many humans and keeping this human alive might just be his salvation. Edmund, curious mind that he has, wants to study Andrew's kind. And as they grow closer, Andrew's beast pushes hard for Andrew to bite Edmund, which Andrew doesn't want to do. But Edmund takes the choice away from him. Andrew's voice is strong and clear, and he tells his story well. I saw no spelling or editing errors to spoil my reading. It's just my bloody quandary! So, since I really am surprised I enjoyed this first person/present tense... 4 solid stars **same worded review will appear elsewhere**

 

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2018-10-29 02:52
Book Review : A quiet kind of thunder Sarah Barnard
A Quiet Kind of Thunder - Sara Barnard

sep 24-29 

A girl who can’t speak and a boy who can’t hear go on a journey of self-discovery and find support with each other in this gripping, emotionally resonant novel from bestselling author Sara Barnard. Perfect for fans of Morgan Matson and Jandy Nelson.

Steffi doesn’t talk, but she has so much to say.
Rhys can’t hear, but he can listen.

Steffi has been a selective mute for most of her life. The condition’s name has always felt ironic to her, because she certainly does not “select” not to speak. In fact, she would give anything to be able to speak as easily and often as everyone around her can. She suffers from crippling anxiety, and uncontrollably, in most situations simply can’t open her mouth to get out the words.

Steffi’s been silent for so long that she feels completely invisible. But Rhys, the new boy at school, sees her. He’s deaf, and her knowledge of basic sign language means that she’s assigned to help him acclimate. To Rhys, it doesn’t matter that Steffi doesn’t talk. As they find ways to communicate, Steffi discovers that she does have a voice, and that she’s falling in love with the one person who makes her feel brave enough to use it. But as she starts to overcome a lifelong challenge, she’ll soon confront questions about the nature of her own identity and the very essence of what it is to know another person


Review : this book was beautiful I loved it Steffi is mute she meets Rhys who is deaf they start to form a friendship I cried a bit in this book cause I related so much to Steffi . Rhys and Steffi start dating . Steffi starts to talk a bit more . Rhys and Steffi decide to go on a secret trip but then a accident happens and Steffi has to talk to get Rhys to the hospital . Rhys sends steffi a email and she tells him to meet up with her and they talk and they decide to talk way more and no more secrets loved this book.

Quotes :

“Panic attacks are a lot like being drunk in some ways, you lose self-control. You cry for seemingly no reason. You deal with the hangover long into the next day.”

“Here are three separate but similar things: shyness, introversion and social anxiety. You can have one, two or all three of these things simultaneously. A lot of the time people thing they're all the same thing, but that's just not true. Extroverts can be shy, introverts can be bold, and a condition like anxiety can strike whatever kind of social animal you are. 

Lots of people are shy. Shy is normal. A bit of anxiety is normal. Throw the two together, add some brain-signal error - a NO ENTRY sign on the neural highway from my brain to my mouth perhaps, though no one really knows - and you have me.” 

 

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