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Search tags: mm-romance
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review 2018-08-21 19:26
Articulate sentences need not apply
The Gamble - Kristen Ashley

I've, mostly, given up on Ashley as her writing style/voice more often than not, constantly draws me in with promise but never delivers. This was a Kindle Freebie and Random Number Generator picked it out of the abyss. 

 

This story:

 

 

An Ashley hero calling the heroine "babe" and/or "baby"? NEVER. (She has an English accent so he also calls her Duchess)

 

 

 

"Executed a perfect 3 point turn". Why did I read this sentence over and over again? Was Ashley a driver instructor in a former life??

 

 

Sandwiched between the "babe" calling, three-point turning, and drama ending was some honest to god deep emotional issues (domestic violence, rape, disabilities) that get broached but never fully developed. Ashley's ability to incorporate these issues and emotions are what tempt me to keep reading her (the promise I was talking about) but ugh, no development. These issues almost start to seem sensationalized and click-bait reading because Ashley doesn't develop the issues and characters. 

 

 

 

The ending, my god, the ending. Drama after sensationalized drama. The repeat situations our heroine found herself in got to be tedious and one of the villains ended up being portrayed cartoonish. 

 

I can see why Ashley is popular and I can see why she in not popular. All I know is, my kingdom for an Ashley hero to speak in full coherent sentences.

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review 2018-08-21 16:59
Review: “The Butterfly King” (The Lost and Founds, #3) by Edmond Manning
The Butterfly King - Edmond Manning

 

~ 5 STARS ~

 

 

********************************************

1st read: September 5th, 2015

1st reread: August 21st, 2018

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review 2018-08-21 11:05
a great easy read
Wanted - Bad Boyfriend - TA Moore
I was gifted my copy of this book, that I write a review was not required. Everyone thinks Nate should have a boyfriend, NEEDS one to be happy. But is ok by himself, mostly. So he hatches a plan with the island's resident bad boy. Pretend to be together for a bit, the Flynn can do his thing, dump Nate and everyone will leave him alone. Only, there are a couple of problems with said plan: both are surprised by the chemistry between them, and actually, Flynn turns out to be quite a good boyfriend. And it becomes a case on not pretending. I LIKED this book. I did not love it though, and *insert wailing sound* I don't know why! It's well told, from both Flynn and Nate's point of view, in the past tense. It has some sexy bits, some funny bits, some difficult reading bits and some emotional bits. We don't get all of Flynn and Nate's history in one go, it comes along bits at time. In fact, much of Flynn's history is still unexplained. I still don't know which of those rumours were true, and just why he did not return for his father's funeral. It does throw a CORKER twist at you though! I did NOT see that one coming, not at all!! There I was, merrily reading away *don't tell anyone* on a quiet Sunday afternoon at work, and BOOM!!! Moore throws that at me and I'm like SAY WHAT NOW!?!?!?!?!? Out loud! I rarely am vocal when reading (more so when listening) and my colleague is like "Are you okay?" And I'm like "but look what she did!" Seriously well played with that Ms Moore, very VERY well played! Like I said, it's well told, well written and well delivered. I saw no spelling or editing errors to spoil my reading experience and I read it in that one afternoon. I'm just sorry I didn't love it though. 4 solid stars **same worded review will appear elsewhere**

 

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review 2018-08-21 09:12
Falling In Love With English Boys by Melissa Jensen
Falling in Love with English Boys - Melissa Jensen

Sixteen-year-old Catherine Vernon has been stranded in London for the summer-no friends, no ex-boyfriend Adam the Scum (good riddance!), and absolutely nothing to do but blog about her misery to her friends back home. Desperate for something-anything-to do in London while her (s)mother's off researching boring historical things, Cat starts reading the 1815 diary of Katherine Percival her mom gives her-and finds the similarities between their lives to be oddly close. But where Katherine has the whirls of the society, the parties and the gossip over who is engaged to who, Cat's only got some really excellent English chocolate. Then she meets William Percival-the uber-hot descendant of Katherine-and things start looking up . . .

Amazon.com

 

 

 

This epistolary novel spans two centuries (through alternating chapters, all of Cat's chapters headed with song titles), combining the stories of two young women, Cat and Katherine. Cat, who shares her adventures with the reader via a blog format, is a modern day American teen who travels with her mom to the UK so that her mom may study the life of Mary Percival, whom Cat describes as "some woman who did absolutely nothing of import and has been dead for two hundred years."

 

*In the story, this Mary Percival character died before the age of 45, like Jane Austen. The reader will pretty quickly notice that this novel is heavily influenced / inspired by Austen's work.*

 

Katherine is a teen in 1815 England, whose story is provided through journal entries. While reading the excerpts from the journals of both Katherine and Mary Percival, Austen fans will likely notice that those journal scenes are basically remixes of plot points from Austen's Sense & Sensibility as well as Pride & Prejudice, but with some changes to make it Jensen's own unique imaginings. For one, a character in Katherine's era drinks too much at a party and suffers a sexual assault... which helps make even this fluff piece a bit of timely reading material.

 

While it may be easy to dismiss this as an easy breezy read, there are some respectable moments of character growth to be had here as well as some important, and as I said earlier, timely, topics to think on. Cat outwardly comes off as spoiled and obnoxious, but as the reader gets to know her a bit better, we learn that there's actually a fair amount of emotional hurt in her that she's struggling to address. But I did enjoy her sense of humor.

 

For example, visiting the Tower of London and the National Portrait Gallery and coming back with the hilariously simplified "King Henry (VIII) was rather hard on his wives... and I gotta say, after Anne Boleyn, they all look a bit anxious."

 

Continuing on in the NPG: "Winston Churchill didn't always look like a bulldog... Queen Victoria kinda did..."

 

Meanwhile, Katherine in her own time is struggling to maintain her sense of self when it's expected that she should just go along with her father's plan for her. I grew to really like Katherine's mother, who did her best to keep her daughter distanced from the gross choice of a suitor Katherine's father had picked out for her.

 

Mama curled in her favorite cushiony chair, feet tucked beneath her. In the moment, with the fire behind her and her face softened by shadow, she was familiar, like a mirror.

 

"Promise me something, Katherine," she said in a quiet moment.

 

"If I can."

 

"Oh, you can. Promise me that you will think, in every moment possible, what you want for yourself. And you will stand for yourself, especially in the times when no one seems interested in standing for you."

 

I did not understand, not really, but I promised nonetheless.

 

One moment in the story also illustrates a good point regarding double standards to think on: If we can acknowledge that some women may be fine pursuing fat, ugly or socially odious men simply for monetary gain, why is it so baffling to think men might likewise pursue plain women for THEIR wealth?

 

If you only get through the first few chapters of this, it'll be easy to dismiss it as forgettable froth, but there is a layer of depth here I found impressive and entertaining. Admittedly, I did prefer Katherine's portions of the book, but I'm a history junkie, not to mention I just found her story, that of a young woman so desperately trying to show others she has plenty of worth as an individual, not dependent on nabbing a husband, much more interesting than Cat's humorous but somewhat privileged ramblings around London... but Cat, though maybe a little irritating at first... she grew on me :-)

 

 

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text 2018-08-21 08:10
Beat the Back to School Blues Entangled Teen Sale


Summer may be winding down and the school year is kicking off soon. Beat those back to school blues with some of these great steals.

15 amazing YA reads on sale for just 99¢ each!

Fantasy, mystery, contemporary, paranormal and more! No matter what you are in the mood for you will find it here.

 
 

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