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review 2017-03-29 02:48
Harriet the Spy
Harriet the Spy - Louise Fitzhugh

Harriet the Spy is about a girl who writes down everything she notices or feels about everyone, including those she calls her friends. This is a fantastic book that many students can relate to - whether they have felt isolated, bullied, or have been a bully. Students can learn from Harriet the Spy how be honest but gracious and nice.

 

With this novel, I would read it aloud as well as assign chapters to read for students in any grade between third or fifth grade. We would throughout the readings have class discussions on character, setting, plot and analysis, as well as have short quizzes when assigned chapters to read to test reading. In a fifth grade class, I would at the end of the reading have my students write an essay discussing when it is okay to write about people and why.

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review 2017-03-29 01:20
I would have been a runaway
Terms & Conditions: Life in Girls' Boarding-Schools, 1939-1979 (Slightly Foxed Editions) - Ysenda Maxtone-Graham

Terms & Conditions: Life in Girls' Boarding Schools, 1939-1979 by Ysenda Maxtone Graham is exactly what I was looking for this week. As the title suggests, this is a non-fiction book about what it was like to attend a boarding school for girls from the years of 1939-79 (in the United Kingdom obviously). The author conducted numerous interviews of women who attended these school who recalled startlingly vivid memories (both ill and pleasant) of their time there. From what it was like to be separated from family at a young age (some incredibly young) to the traumatic recollections of the horrible food they were forced to eat to what really went on when a bunch of hormonal girls were kept sequestered without any boys in sight this is a book that is both informative and interesting. (It's also super funny.) I've read some fanciful stories about what it's like to live in a boarding school but never true accounts from the girls themselves about what actually went on behind those austere facades. (Seriously a ton of them were in manor houses and castles which makes me super jealous.) There are many similarities between the institutions and also some gargantuan differences. For instance, some of the places (Cheltenham for instance) were strict, highly academic, and the girls that left there were more likely to continue into higher education. Others were more practically minded (or obsessed with horses and sports) and the girls that left there were generally encouraged to go to secretarial college and then look for a husband almost immediately after entering the workforce. It's an eye-opening read about what it was like for these upper-crust girls who were sent away by their families and then suppressed by these same people into wanting less for themselves. I highly recommend this not only because it's extremely well-written and researched but also because it's so fascinating comparing it to the way young women of today are educated and their expectations after leaving school. 10/10

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2017-03-28 19:59
Hop on the "Magic School Bus" Fad
The Magic School Bus Inside the Human Body - Joanna Cole,Bruce Degen

As with all "Magic School Bus" books, this one is clever, educational, and funny. Students will be engaged when reading. The school bus shrinks down and enters Arnold's body. The class explores the digestive system, circulatory system, and other systems of the body. I would use this book to introduce (or re-introduce) the human body systems and their functions. For an activity, I would have the students split into human body system groups. They would trace their body on a piece of white butcher paper and draw their specific system with a decent amount of accuracy (those with the skeletal system would draw bones inside the outline). I would hang them up in the hall for everyone to see. :)

 

A.R.- 4.6

Guided Reading- P

Lexile- AD 520L

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text 2017-03-27 22:06
Thank You, Mr. Falker - Patricia Polacco

Patricia Polacco's book, Thank you, Mr. Falker, holds a very special place in my heart as a future teacher. The book is based off of true events that took place in the life of Polacco, herself, growing up. It addresses criticial issues seen in schools across the world, such as bullying or reading difficulties. Trisha, the central character of the story, craves the sweet knowledge of how to read, but she is different than most students. She suffers major difficulties in reading and begins to fall behind all of the other students. About midways through the book, she loses both of her grandparents, who were her biggest supporters in the work. The other students also begin to pick on her, calling her dumb for not knowing how to read. When her grandparents pass away, her family decides to move. For Trisha, she hopes this will give her a new opportunity to not be bullied; however, things are much worse at her new school. A boy in her class, Eric, is relentless about degrading her in class. It's not until the school gets a new teacher, Mr. Falker, that Trisha is able to see hope in the future of her reading. This book covers a diverse amount of topics that should be addressed within the classroom. Its lexile reading level is AD650L, and it can be read by most students who are ages six through nine. Honestly, I feel as though this book should also be read in the middle and high school setting. This presents a way for teachers to talk about bullying within the school and in the classrooms. Aside from bullying, this book allows the teacher to talk openly about how all students are different when it comes to reading. Some students can be considered advanced readers, and others are considered struggling readers. The teacher can highlight this very aspect by simply reading about the classrooms that Trisha was in throughout the story. The teacher could also use this book to talk about how some students can suffer loss within their families. Students could have a death in their family, or maybe they are having to move schools and make changes. This book is full of endless opportunities to talk about these issues within the classroom. In my classroom, I would definitely want to use this book to address bullying. I would read the book with my class, and then students could organize either group skits or maybe even a class skit to show the implications of bullying in school.

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text 2017-03-27 21:06
Pete the Cat: Rocking in My School Shoes - Eric Litwin,James Dean

Pete the Cat: Rocking in My School Shoes tells the story of Pete, a blue cat, who is starting his first day of school. Eric Litwin, the author, highlights many different places in the school that Pete has never been before such as the library, the lunchroom, and the playground. All of these locations could be places that students could find intimidating on their first day of school, but Pete is one cool cat who does not worry! Litwin incorporates a song into his book that is catchy for young readers to listen to. Believe me, it will be stuck in your head all day long! This book would be great to read on the first day of school to a kindergarten class, or preschoolers getting ready to begin kindergarten. You could even lend a copy to a new student in your class who may be feeling anxious about their first day and being in a new school setting. The book's reading level is for kindergarten and its lexile level is AD600L. Pete is the perfect example of how all students should feel on their first day at school: excited to learn and full of confidence! 

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