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Search tags: The-Calling
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text 2017-07-15 22:35
Multi-Author Mystery and Thriller Sale (My rare promotional post)
The Calling (Mae Martin Mysteries Book 1) - Amber Foxx

Since a  lot of the people who follow this review blog are mystery fans, I thought you might like to know where you can find  some mystery and thriller bargains this weekend. Book One in the Mae Martin Psychic Mystery Series, The Calling, is on sale for 99 cents along with many others, spanning all aspects of the mystery and thriller genres.

 

For my fellow Nook owners and others who read on something other than a Kindle, my books are on all e-book retail sites, never just Amazon.

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text 2017-07-09 16:15
Reading progress update: I've read 100%.
The Cuckoo's Calling - Robert Galbraith

Other than the ending, which I'm really not sure about, I enjoyed this a lot.

 

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text 2017-07-07 20:40
Reading progress update: I've read 56%.
The Cuckoo's Calling - Robert Galbraith

I'm loving this! The characterisation is so vivid that I don't even care about the plot! The plot's excellent, though, don't get me wrong. And there are another couple of books in the series. Result!

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review 2017-06-08 00:00
Dark Moon Wolf (Calling the Moon #1) by Sarah E Stevens
Dark Moon Wolf (Calling the Moon Book 1) - Sarah E. Stevens

Julie is a librarian and a single mother with a newborn and just coming to grips with that. When, one full moon, her baby turns into a wolf pup.

 

Utterly confused she clings to the one person who may have answers – the father of her child. Only to find Mac is dead, murdered – and he’s not the first werewolf from his pack who has been targeted. And whoever took those wolves are now targeting her baby

 

 

 

This is one of those books where it’s a little weird that the protagonist is involved. I mean, Julie is human, completely human no special abilities, and she has an infant child in tow. Yes that baby has been threated and it’s understandable that she would want to stop this threat – but running towards it, playing amateur detective in a strange city with unknown enemies while carrying a baby along with you? That doesn’t seem reasonable or sensible. She’s not just running into danger like so many Urban Fantasy protagonist – but she decided to bring her baby along for the ride.

 

It’s one of the underlying issues of this book which can be hard to follow –the constant question of why the protagonist is even here. Why is she involved, why is she making decisions in this situation she knows so little about – it’s a perennial problem whenever we have a human protagonist in a supernatural book.

 

But it sits alongside a whole lot of things that are done so well. After all one of the minor conflicts of this book is Julie feeling so very out of place among the werewolves and the witches and being depreciating – without a huge amount of angst – in her own abilities, but still finding her own ways to contribute and help.

 

The leader of the werewolf pack is a woman. Yes, an actual woman alpha – and she openly pokes at the whole idea of a big hair man who would have to lead a werewolf pack. And there is a moment of girlhate with Julie deciding to make massive assumptions about Lilly because of her appearance – deciding she looks like “a stripper” and being generally shamy and contemptuous. But it’s all subverted by the fact she is the alpha and clearly powerful and capable and a more than decent leader. Julie’s prejudiced judgement are exposed to be exactly what they are in the face of her capability

 

And the main characters joining Julie in her mission to find out what happened to Mac (her ex) are both women – there’s Sheila her lifelong friend with her own supernatural secrets and Eliza a female werewolf (multiple female werewolves! It’s odd to say but this genre seems to have almost adopted a law that all werewolves must be male which makes this both so special and unique) with a lot of power and strength. In both cases – and with another female werewolf (another one!) companion of Mac’s, Julie does have moments of jealousy and feelings of inadequacy, thinking how much more attractive they are than her. But it’s presented very much that it’s her own insecurities being unreasonable rather than any actual fault on the part of the women. And Julie recognises it in herself as well and works through it.

 

 

I like the world building that goes into adding some level of depth to werewolf culture, some more elements and mysticism and the general moving away from werewolves and sheer physicality, violence and brutality that is so common. At the same time I would have liked to know more about it – and witchcraft – part of me thinks that Julie asked very few questions considering this whole supernatural world opened up in front of her and her baby boy is apparently part of it but at the same time given the immediacy of the threats she had to deal with and the new reality she had to absorb I can equally understand why she put all of that on the back burner. I think we can see that in the way she looks to integrate herself into the supernatural first before learning about the world as a whole. And on that – I have to say I absolutely love how she didn’t just leap at the hyper risky way she could be more fully part of the supernatural world. I mean, in this genre how many protagonist hear “you can do this but there’s a 50% chance you’ll die” and instantly leap at the chance, confident in all of their lovely plot armour? Julie is more sensible than that

 

 

 

Read More

 

 

Source: www.fangsforthefantasy.com/2017/06/dark-moon-wolf-calling-moon-1-by-sarah.html
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text 2017-02-06 19:39
The Best Laid Plans-February Edition
Martyr - Rory Clements
Mary Queen of Scotland and the Isles - Margaret George
Crown of Blood: The Deadly Inheritance of Lady Jane Grey - Nicola Tallis
A Perilous Undertaking - Deanna Raybourn
The Cuckoo's Calling - Robert Galbraith
The Flame Bearer (Saxon Tales) - Bernard Cornwell

I had planned on writing out my reading plans for February last week. Then the flu decided to rear its ugly head and tear through my house like my four olds tore threw Christmas presents. Of course the one time a year I happen to get sick also happens to be the time the other adult in my house decided to have dental work done. If I'm praying to the porcelain god and he's delirious from the pain medication, who exactly is watching our children? A Kindle and some Legos watched my oldest. Twin B was worshiping next to me. Twin A was hanging out outside of the bathroom door crying because we put her twin in quarantine. Where's a grandma when you need one? 

 

Anyway enough about my problems. Let's talk about my books! I am off to a great start this year. My personal reading goal for the year is 75. That's a bit under last year's goal of 175 but last year I was at home all day, every day with my kids until I decided to start working again in December. I've also recently become part of a crusade to get a referendum passed so my children can go to school in a building that doesn't have condemned classrooms and fungal issues. I've been spending a lot of my spare time consuming massive amounts of wine after explaining to people why they should care about the future of their children's education. Apparently around here we are suppose to care more about the future of old bricks and concrete than the flesh and blood and brains inside said bricks and concrete. Ugh. 

 

Seriously, I ramble. I can't help it. Those of you who take the time out of your day to stop and read this are the closest thing I get to adult interaction sometimes. I work at an elementary school. Sure there are adults there but who has time to talk to them? 

 

Anyway. Really this time, I'm going to tell you what I want to read in February.

 

At the beginning of the month I wanted to finish Martyr by Rory Clements. By the time I've gotten around to writing this post, I've finished. It checks of one of my Monopoly spaces.

-Side note: Over at Goodreads, I'm a member of a Historical Mysteries group. For 2017 we are playing Historical Mystery Monopoly. Want to join us? Come on over! 

https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/18382705-historical-mystery-monopoly-2017---rules-questions

 

This month I also desperately want to finish Mary Queen of Scotland and The Isles by Margaret George. I have been reading this book since the end of August 2016. It's not that I don't like George's work. I loved her novel about Henry VIII. It's just that I have such a hard time with Mary, Queen of Scots. She is just not very bright. I spend a lot of time wanting to throw my books. It's a pretty big book so I should probably avoid throwing it. 

 

Carrying on with the theme of finishing things, I am also looking to finish Crown of Blood: The Deadly Inheritance of Lady Jane Grey by Nicola Tallis. So far it is excellent. At times, I have to remind myself I'm reading non-fiction. I'm pleasantly surprised by the author who is said to have honed her craft at the feet of Alison Weir. 

 

Finally, I want to finish The Man in the Queue by Josephine Tey and The Fairy-Tale Detectives by Michael Buckley.

 

Hopefully by the time I am done finishing books I will have time for some new books. 

Some of those books I hope to read include:

The Crocodile on the Sandbank by Elizabeth Peters (my next Monopoly square)

The Cuckoo's Calling by Robert Galbraith

A Perilous Undertaking by Deana Raybourn

The Flame Bearer by Bernard Cornwell

 

 

 

 

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