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text 2018-01-23 11:07
Travel To Exotic South Africa With Your Family

Travelling with children requires a lot of planning. South Africa is a hot tourist destination and children will simply fall in love with the culture and exotic wildlife. It is important to include child friendly destinations and activities in order to ensure that children enjoy as much as you do. Air Organisers offer holiday specials South Africa packages that are specially crafted for you. Book your holiday to South Africa with Air Organisers and enjoy special rates on flights and hotels. You can choose your package out of the number of packages curated for you. Enjoy the sun, sand and the picturesque landscape of South Africa with your family.

 

Air Organisers offer a wide selection of South Africa vacation packages and includes the best sightseeing options in South Africa. Whether you are visiting for 5 nights or for 15 nights, they have packages which include your flights and stay. The packages are affordable and organized in every manner. Traveling with children requires constant organization and planning and Air Organisers is happy to do the same for you. It works with a number of travel agencies in South Africa in order to ensure that your experience is nothing but satisfying. With every holiday, they have met the expectations of the travelers and ensured that they have a memorable time. Air Organisers offer the best price in hotel booking and offer complete assistance in visa and passport services. They will help you with cost optimization and offer a range of packages at an affordable rate.

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review 2018-01-16 19:33
Review: Under A Prairie Moon
Under a Prairie Moon - Madeline Baker

3.5 Stars.

 

This was not at all what I expected.  I was in the mood for a historical Indian romance, but I never expected ghosts, curses and time travel!  I just opened up a book with a title that sounded interesting and this is what I got.  The story was surprisingly interesting.  A man is betrayed and killed for a crime he didn't commit so he put a curse on the people who killed him and their land.  And boy did the curse ever stick!  Fast-forward 125 years to a woman who was recently widowed by a descendant of the cursed family, and she has now come into ownership of the very cursed ranch.

 

Somehow, after having haunted the place since his death 125 years prior, he finally meets someone who can see him.  After accepting the fact that she has a ghosting haunting her ranch, the two become friends.  She, Kathy, convinces him, Dalton, to tell her about his life so that she can write it all down.  Between spending time doing that and rebuilding the ranch, they fall in love and inexplicably get sent back to his time to right the wrongs done him and to take care of unfinished business.

 

I enjoyed the story even with all the modern-day mixed into it.  I never thought I would enjoy a time travel historical romance, but this pleasantly surprised me.  It was a sweet tale with a happy ending.

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review 2018-01-16 03:37
Details of the Hunt (Details #1) by Laura Baumbach
Details of the Hunt - Laura Baumbach

I just deleted my review without publishing it. I was about to hit "save" button, when I realised that there is not a single positive word that I can write here about this whole ordeal. Instead, here is a simple list of issues I came cross:

- 24 year old manchild, and not the fun Jack Sparrow or Tom Hanks (referring to movie "Big") type;


- 24 year old manchild who by some mighty miracle survived as a pirate and a captain to be 24 years old;


- hygiene;


- neglect. Because letting the poor boy run around in wet clothes, while dirty and stinky is neglect;


- commas. OMG, they are killing this story! Not there is much to kill, but they are the proverbial kick, delivered to someone who is already down :/

 

I really don't know how the two MCs survived; one as a pirate for as long as he did, the other one as a Hunter. Must be by some miracle/fairy godmother.

There were times when this book was a big deal and everyone and their cousin was reading it and loving it. It was such a hype! *sigh* What a disappointment in turned out to be! :(

 



PS I wish Samantha Cayto re-wrote it. After all, there is a potential here, it's the execution that's lacking :(




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review 2018-01-15 22:21
Doomsday Book by Connie Willis
The Doomsday Book - Connie Willis

Series: Oxford Time Travel #1

 

I'm still debating whether I should give this five stars or stick to 4.5. This was a reread for me and I still found it compelling, although I didn't blaze through it in a couple days like I did the first time around. There are, admittedly, some issues with regards to historical accuracy, like being worried about cholera in the 14th century and assuming that mediaeval people were much shorter than modern day ones...but it still works for me.

 

I liked the characters, especially the little girl Agnes, and I loved how people would basically have conversations at cross purposes because they were all in their own little bubbles with their own concerns.

 

Basically, Kivrin is a historian who time travels back to the 14th century to stay for a couple weeks and make a record of the mediaeval life she observes. Of course, her plans go awry and plot happens, and her unofficial tutor, Mr. Dunworthy, tries to get her back.

 

I really wish more books would combine the mediaeval time period and science fiction.

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review 2018-01-14 22:42
Well, I can see the appeal to movie directors ...
The Lady Vanishes & the Spiral Staircase (Wordsworth Classics) - Ethel Lina White,Keith Carabine
The Lady Vanishes - Ethel Lina White
Some Must Watch - Ethel Lina White

... but in written form, this isn't really my cup of tea.  Which isn't necessarily the fault of White's writing is such -- she has a fine eye (and ear) for characterization and language -- but rather, of her chosen topic.  I've never been much of a fan of "women in peril" stories; they tend to be replete with fevered agitation and hyperbole, and however understandable the protagonists' fear and excitement may be in a given situation, the situation as such is almost invariably so unrealistic as to be the literary equivalent of "B movie" material.

 

That being said, Hitchcock definitely milked The Lady Vanishes (which was originally published as The Wheel Spins) for all it was worth and then some -- in fact, this is one of the rare examples where I decidedly prefer the movie over the book: not only because Hitch gave the story a spin that isn't present in the literary original at all (even if that doesn't make the story one iota more realistic -- it's just plainly more fun), but chiefly, because Michael Redgrave's version of Iris's (the heroine's) knight in shining armour is decidedly more likeable than the character from the book, who -- even though he's meant to be likeable -- to me just comes across as one hugely condescending a$$hole, hardly any better than the professor in whose company he travels.  Similarly, Iris herself is more likeable as portrayed by Margaret Lockwood in the movie: whereas there, I am genuinely sympathetic to her strange plight, the book mostly elicited my rage at her fellow passengers' reactions -- however not on Iris's behalf specifically but on behalf of womanhood generally, against a society that automatically disbelieved and put down as hallucinations and figments of an overactive imagination any woman's assertions that weren't supported -- or that were even directly contradicted -- by other witnesses, especially men and / or figures of authority.  (In fact, if I hadn't read Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper, biographical background information included, I'd have dismissed the whole premise of The Lady Vanishes as wildly improbable.  Sadly, at the time of its writing, it wasn't.)

 

The Spiral Staircase (originally published as Some Must Watch) combines a remote country house setting on the Welsh border with a serial killer story; and if the isolation of the house and the prowling maniac weren't enough in and of themselves, the whole action takes place over the course of somewhat less than 12 hours, mostly after nightfall.  I haven't seen any of the several movie adaptations of this story, but I can see how a clever director would be able to ratchet up the tension quite skillfully here, what with the dwindling down of effective defenses against the maniac and a cast of fairly outlandish (and unlikeable) characters inside the house -- if you buy into the premonition that this house is where the serial killer is headed next, and that he is after the book's heroine, to begin with.

 

I liked The Spiral Staircase a bit better than The Lady Vanishes -- 3 1/2 vs. 2 1/2 stars, respectively, which averages out to 3 stars for both together.

 

The Spiral Staircase (under its original title Some Must Watch) is mentioned as an example of a country house mystery in Martin Edwards's The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books, so I'll be counting that towards the corresponding square of my Detection Club bingo card, and both books, in addition, also towards the Women Writers Bingo.

 

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