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Search tags: True-Crime
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text 2018-09-14 03:31
Reading progress update: I've read 8 out of 241 pages.
True Crime Stories - Max Haines
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text 2018-09-02 18:27
Reading progress update: I've read 50%.
The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America - Erik Larson

Wow, so was Holmes Manson before Manson was a thing? Everyone talks about how he was able to attract women and men to him. I feel so bad for these women you are hearing about who were taking in by the guy who then murdered them, and sold their skeletons for a profit to medical schools.

 

Barnham seems to be going through some bad luck trying to get the World's Fair design going.

 

The sections on Holmes though are eye opening and still are more intriguing to me as a true crime reader. Larson makes you feel as if you are standing besides these people and have the ever elusive and inhumane Holmes peering into you.


Shudder.

 

Perfect read for Halloween Bingo though.

 

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text 2018-09-02 02:24
Reading progress update: I've read 25%.
The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America - Erik Larson

Well the sections following Holmes are good. The initial sections following Burnham were good, but quickly got boring at least to me. I rather follow Holmes. The book feels a bit overstuffed at the moment. It's interesting to see what Holmes was up to in Chicago when Jack the Ripper was terrifying White Chapel at the same time.

 

“Holmes was charming and gracious, but something about him made Belknap uneasy. He could not have defined it. Indeed, for the next several decades alienists and their successors would find themselves hard-pressed to describe with any precision what it was about men like Holmes that could cause them to seem warm and ingratiating but also telegraph the vague sense that some important element of humanness was missing.” 

 

Very interesting that the first time psychopath was used was in the 1870s to describe this lack of humaness. 

 

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text 2018-09-01 23:37
Reading progress update: I've read 5%.
The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America - Erik Larson

Well so far loving the illustrations and how the book is being set up. I have been meaning to read about Henry H Holmes for years. Tying him together with architect Daniel Hudson Burnham is very interesting. 

 

Reading about the Chicago's World Fair in 1893 seems surreal. I cannot imagine going into a place that got around 700,000 visitors a day. The sites that were built some beyond comprehension.

 

I am reading this one for the Creepy Carnivals square. 

 

 

 

 

 

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review 2018-08-10 22:30
BENEATH A RUTHLESS SUN by Gilbert King, narrated by Kimberly Farr
Beneath a Ruthless Sun: A True Story of Violence, Race, and Justice Lost and Found - Gilbert King,Kimberly Farr

The reason I requested this book from my library was because of Megan Abbott's 

excellent, succinct review, which can be found here: BENEATH A RUTHLESS SUN

 

 

This is the shocking true story of a mentally challenged white man who was railroaded into confessing to a rape and who was then sent to a state hospital for over 14 years WITH NO TRIAL. It's a story of racism, small town corruption, networks made up of good old boys, and most importantly, a tenacious reporter named Mabel who never, ever gave up.

 

You know, I say it's a "shocking" story, but unfortunately, it's really not. Black or white, (mostly black), mentally challenged, and ALL poor-many people have not received a fair shake in this country over the years. It's unfortunate to note that many of them STILL are not receiving a fair shake. This book only proves how important a free press can be to the causes of justice and fair play.

 

Even though she has since passed of cancer, I feel the need to say WAY TO GO, Mabel! If it weren't for you, poor Jessie Daniels would probably have died in the state hospital.

 

Thanks to Megan Abbott for her intriguing review and thanks to my local library for providing the audiobook for free. Libraries RULE!

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