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review 2017-10-23 20:38
The Authorized: Roy orbison by Roy Jr., Wesley & Alex Orbison
The Authorized Roy Orbison - Alex Orbiso... The Authorized Roy Orbison - Alex Orbison,Roy Orbison,Wesley Orbison,Jeff Slate

What an incredible story!
Truth be told, I knew of Roy Orbison, the musician. Now I feel like I really know him though. Wow, what an amazing and tumultuous life he had. Rising to the top one minute only to be brought down by the worst of circumstances, over and over again.
His sons, who wrote the book, really take you inside their lives with their dad and show you the real story of his life. You gain so much insight as to why or how things were the way they were.
The photos were nice to see too, some I had seen, but most were new to me. I saw so many celebrities and family, all who Roy loved closely and cherished, but was sad to not see one photo of him and Elvis. A man he admired so much and was friends with as well.
Still, this is an excellent read. And with Tom Petty's passing as I write this out, it almost feels poetic that I finished this book today.

 

 

Source: www.fredasvoice.com/2017/10/the-authorized-roy-orbison-by-roy-jr.html
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review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-10-23 15:03
Glowing Fish & Bucketfuls of Spider Silk in Goat Milk, Frankenstein’s Cat by Emily Anthes Showcases Some of the Wonders of the Biotechnological World While also Raising Some Important Questions!
Frankenstein's Cat: Cuddling Up to Biotech's Brave New Beasts - Emily Anthes

 

 

 

The penultimate installment in Project Frankenstein was a joy to read. It was relatively short and full of stuff that I find interesting. I am dividing this review into three parts:

 

1. Here is a Snippet from the book:

 

 

2. Then there were these Sciency Bits that I enjoyed ruminating upon:

Cloning other adult mammals reinforced the discovery that nuclear transfer can reset genes contained in specialized cells back to their embryonic state.

It meant that the genetic clock could supposedly be turned back if things didn’t go so well the first time!

It is my content that the northern grasslands would have remained viable…had the great herds of Pleistocene animals remained in place to maintain the landscape.

This occurred to me for the first time. Yes, the Ice Ages may have changed the landscape physically but it also caused the extinction of the grazers and caused changes in a roundabout way.

…(tuna) are warm-blooded, which makes them oddities in the fish world but keeps them toasty…

They are what?! Why are you doing this to me world? I was so happy, thinking all fish are cold-blooded but no! I hate nature!

International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT)

While The Sixth Extinction left me without hope, this book helped me see that we aren’t all bad eggs. Yes, humans have brought the onset of Anthropocene and change environment wherever they go…

We have harvested so many of these large deer, elk, and sheep over the centuries that many species have evolved smaller body and horn sizes. Similarly, fish have adapted to human harvesting by developing thinner bodies capable of sneaking out of nets.

Yet, organizations like ICCAT are keeping track of the number of bluefin tuna that are being pulled out of water annually. The Integrated Ocean Observing System is tagging elephant seals and other swimmers to gather information about the marine environment. Then there is Ocean Tracking Network that has been busy installing underwater listening stations that will pick up on tagged animals. The list of scientists and researchers trying to collect information goes on and on. There is even an attempt to engage the public and increase awareness via animal Facebook profiles. The point is, it took us decades if not more to wreck things. We will need some time to put them back together and it is a pity if nature doesn’t grant us that respite.

 

3. And a Franken-Bit that I shook an admonitory finger at:

The manufacturers of AquAdvantage salmon think that by producing only sterile female fish, they can keep them from reproducing or passing along their genes.

 

 

Even though the book raises pertinent questions about whether animals can incur psychological damage from being tagged, it doesn’t answer them. To be fair, most of us won’t be able to say no to a drug, if it would save a loved one, even if one or two clauses of animal rights weren’t observed!

 

Could you?

 

Image

 

Originally published at midureads.wordpress.com on October 23, 2017.

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text 2017-10-23 03:20
Reading progress update: I've read 81 out of 187 pages.
The Lion in the Living Room: How House Cats Tamed Us and Took Over the World - Abigail Tucker

Even with their categorization as an invasive species, cat eradication makes me sad.

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text 2017-10-23 01:01
Reading progress update: I've read 333 out of 371 pages.
Life: An Unauthorised Biography: A Natural History of the First Four Thousand Million Years of Life on Earth - Richard Fortey

Chapter XI  - Suckling Success

 

All about mammals, basically. With a little bit about birds.

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review 2017-10-22 22:00
Book 70/100: The Art of Waiting - On Fertility, Medicine, and Motherhood by Belle Boggs

The Art of Waiting: On Fertility, Medicine, and MotherhoodThe Art of Waiting: On Fertility, Medicine, and Motherhood by Belle Boggs
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

More than just a memoir on infertility, this is a collection of essays through which the author uses her own infertility journey to examine the ethical, political, biological, and even literary issues surrounding difficulty conceiving.

I appreciated this approach, even though I found the author's personal story to be the most compelling; I often wanted to find out more than she disclosed. For example, she mentioned low progesterone and that "multiple issues" contributed to her infertility, but she never went into further specifics than that. Perhaps a lay reader would not be interested in all the gory details, but as someone who tried for almost two years before conceiving my son, I am familiar with the jargon and the various potential issues and was hungry (voyeuristically, perhaps) to know specifics.

My favorite essay by far was "Imaginary Children," which examines both the way we imagine yet-to-be-born children of our own and the way that literature has grappled with the subject of infertility, particularly the play "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf," which made a lasting impact on me long before I was even thinking of having children or how I would cope if I was unable to do so.

"Paying for It" made me re-examine my views on whether insurance should cover infertility treatment. Although previously on the fence about it ("It would be nice, but are children really a 'right'?"), she convinced me that because it is a medical issue, insurance should pay to treat it just as they would any other health complication.

Boggs' writing is thoughtful and thought-provoking, her prose effortless, the details she chooses to include and her reflections on them meaningful and vivid. My primary complaint is that many of the essays felt as though they ended too abruptly -- in almost every case I was left wanting more.

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