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text 2017-02-18 13:08
Happy birthday, Queen Mary!

The girl who would become England's first Queen Regnant was born on this day 501 years ago. To celebrate, I am at EHFA with a fresh look at who Queen Mary really was. Maybe, just for her birthday, we can stop calling her 'Bloody Mary'.

 

Source: englishhistoryauthors.blogspot.com/2017/02/the-unpopular-tudor.html
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text 2017-02-13 02:23
Reading progress update: I've read 257 out of 384 pages.
Crown of Blood: The Deadly Inheritance of Lady Jane Grey - Nicola Tallis

The Fathers have eaten sour grapes, and the children's teeth are set on edge: the innocent Lady must suffer for her Father's fault; for if her Father the Duke of Suffolk, had not this second time made shipwreck of his loyalty, his Daughter perhaps had never tasted the salt-waters of the Queen's displeasure.

 

-If I stop reading, she will live right? Like that episode of Friends where Joey puts Little Women in the freezer so Beth won't die? 

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text 2017-02-08 15:53
Proofs have arrived!

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text 2017-02-08 13:39
The Fine Line Between Bastard and Princess

I am a guest at History Rocks! We are taking a look at a few bastardized princesses who had their revenge by becoming queen. Can't hold these ladies down!

 

There are also several book giveaway opportunities!

 

Source: historyrocks.us/2016/11/20/fine-line-blog
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review 2017-01-28 20:13
How to be a Tudor
How To Be A Tudor: A Dawn-to-Dusk Guide to Everyday Life - Ruth Goodman

How to be a Tudor is exactly what it is labeled as - a "dawn to dusk guide" to the Tudor era.  It covers some of the same ground as Ian Mortimer's Time Traveler's Guide to Elizabethan England, but discusses much that book does not, and covers a wider timespan, from 1485 to the start of the 17th century.

 

And it is excellent.  We start with getting up in the morning, at cock's crow, which in summer would be about 4 AM, and a discussion about beds, and why Shakespeare leaving his wife the second best bed wasn't an insult.  (Beds were among the most valuable things people owned, probably second only to land, if they owned any.)

 

We then go through the Tudor day, dealing with everything from prayers to meal times (aristocrats were very sniffy about the lower orders starting to eat breakfast), and what people ate.

 

What did people eat?  They ate bread, and they spent far more (proportionally) on food than we do.  Consider what you eat today.  How much of it is made of items not grown in Tudor England (basically anything from the New World, from chocolate to corn)?  Substitute bread.  How much of it is available to you this time of year, in a world without refrigeration?  Substitute bread.

 

That's a lot of bread.

 

As with anything, some of the subjects covered are of more interest to me than others - but a truly comprehensive and fascinating book.  Recommended to anyone interested in the period.

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