logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: UAB-Music
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-01-21 04:41
The Silver Music Box (Silver Music Box #1) (Audiobook)
The Silver Music Box - Mina Baites,Alison Layland

From the blurb, I thought this was going to be about Lillian finding out about her roots and trying to research where her family came from and what happened to them during WWII, but that part of the plot doesn't come in until a little over 2/3s of the way through the book. Instead, it starts out with Johann Blumenthal fighting in WWI for Germany, then follows through to his son Paul at the dawn of the Nazis taking over power and Paul's eventual attempts to get his family out of the country. When things are looking grim for them, it then drops that storyline and jumps forward to the 1960s to Lillian, where I thought the story was going to start.

 

It was a bit jarring to start off, since I wasn't expecting the story to be so linear, but in the end, I found it more effective getting to know the Blumenthal's and seeing their attempts to stay in Germany as long as they could before realizing - perhaps too late - that they needed to flee to save themselves. It was disheartening to see them doing everything they could to be good Germans, in a Germany that cared about them less and less, and to see the small steps that began to segregate the Jews from the main populace more and more until the Nazis were in power and didn't care about being quite so subtle anymore. 

 

This is compounded when they end up in Capetown in South Africa - they're safe there, but all around them is apartheid - which was implemented based on Aryan propaganda and laws.

(spoiler show)

 

I did feel at times that the characters were there more to serve as plot points, and Charolette suffers the most from this since she mostly just reacts while Paul is making all the preparations. Knowing how many women worked in the underground and resistance forces during WWII, I would have liked to see Charolette take a more active role. 

 

I also would have liked more time to get to know Lillian so her story arc could have more weight, but seeing her so driven to find out everything she could about where she came from and what happened to her family was touching nonetheless. 

 

The narrator, Jane Oppenheimer, who I first heard narrating The Moonlit Garden, was an odd choice I think for this story. She has a very mellow and soothing voice, which dulled the tension from a story that really should have been tense.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-01-19 19:40
When the Uncertainty Principle Goes to 11
When the Uncertainty Principle Goes to 11: Or How to Explain Quantum Physics with Heavy Metal - Philip Moriarty

[I received a copy of this book through NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.]

Why, oh, why did I take so much time to read this book? Well, alright, perhaps because I was busy reading other books to teach myself some physics principles, which, I admit, is never a bad thing when your physics classes go back to some, uhhhm, twenty years ago. At the very least.

I found this “metal + physics” approach to be a very intriguing and interesting one—all the more since the author injects a regular dose of humour into it, but never without a purpose (a.k.a. “how to discuss spatial periods using Stryper’s (in)famous striped pants as an example”). I suppose this approach may not work for everyone, but it definitely worked for me, probably because I never took myself too seriously even when dealing with serious things, because, after all, what does it matter, as long as we keep learning, right? Besides, it doesn’t harm when you can feel the passion shining through, and this was clearly the case here.

Overall, the topics broached here made a lot of sense. My own level in maths isn’t terrific, yet the author’s explanations were enough even for me to understand the principles and the equations he related to metal, harmonics, waves and strings, and so on. They don’t remain at such a basic level that they don’t bring much to one’s knowledge of physics (unless you’re already a post-graduate or someone working in that field already, in which case I suspect Fourier’s analysis of waves/patterns won’t seem such a wonder anymore—or will it?), and at the same time, they don’t stray into such abstractions that a beginner will completely lose their footing either. At any rate, I found it quite easy to picture phases when compared to a metalhead moving in a mosh pit…

Seriously, where was Professor Moriarty when I was studying physics at school? (Alright, alright, probably still doing his Ph. D., I guess.)

Like Reblog Comment
url 2019-01-16 09:43
CRAFT YOUR MUSICAL PASSION WITH BEST GUITAR LESSONS, SINGING LESSONS AND PIANO TEACHER

This year, let’s kickstart your musical passion with at Home Piano Lessons, Singing Lesson, and Best vocal coaches near me in San Antonio. Have you ever thought of adding a musical zing to your life? Beats and melodies can be your fabulous musketeers; and not just one, there are plenty of reasons to embark on a melodic lesson journey. Read More Information Visit Website- https://pianoguitarsinginglessons.com/craft-your-musical-passion-with-best-guitar-lessons-singing-lessons-and-piano-teacher/

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-01-13 17:16
THE SAME DEEP WATER AS YOU by Chad Lutzke
The Same Deep Water as You - Chad Lutzke

 

I'll start simple: I love me some Chad Lutzke! THE SAME DEEP WATER AS YOU is yet another tale from the author I view as the one most able to make me cry. If there was a ribbon for that, he would take blue for first place.

 

As always, Chad put together an intimate story where his writing is top notch. The language is plain but the words are put together in such a way that they make you feel. They're like tiny little word arrows shot into your heart.

 

 

" You can put life on hold for a whole year dating someone, getting to know them, and then it all falls apart. Your heart is broken and you can’t do shit for another half a year without thinking of them, missing them, missing all that wasted time. I suppose with each one we walk away learning something about ourselves, about life, about how to love. Maybe we’re all just stepping stones for each other. We’re all helping somebody get somewhere. From here to a better there."

 

 

 

While I did enjoy this novella, I didn't feel the same poignancy that I normally experience when reading Chad's work. I've been thinking on it and I've come up with this for the reason why: the time period in which it's set. I came of age of with ACDC, Motley, Judas and Ozzy. I'm pretty sure The Cure came after that?? That means that all references to them went right over my head, (other than those to their most popular songs.) Being more familiar with the band and their music would probably have provided that extra connection or nostalgia I felt I was missing.

 

This is still Chad Lutzke though, so it's all good. It's still a story that grabs you and makes you think. It still has phrases put together in such a way that they touch your heart. It still builds into a satisfying tale in the end and what more could you ask for?

 

Recommended! You can get your copy here: THE SAME DEEP WATER AS YOU

 

 

*I bought this book with my hard earned cash. *

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-01-10 22:44
When the Music's Over - Aidan Thorn

Most people look forward to retirement but it might depend on what you did for a living. For example, if you were.…oooh, I don’t know.… a hitman, you’d probably enjoy living a quiet life where no one knows your face or reputation. Wynn McDonald is that guy. And it’s why he’s less than thrilled to get a call from Alan Castle.

 

Alan & Terry Weir are hard men who’ve ruled Birmingham for years. Wynn was their hired gun before stepping away from the game more than a decade ago. Now Alan wants him back for a special job. Terry’s son Harry has been murdered by his business partner Benny Gower who’s since disappeared. The “request” is simple: find him & make him suffer.

 

Wynn is stunned. He knew both men well. And Benny has to know Terry Weir will hunt him to the ends of the earth. What was he thinking? It makes no sense. Wynn has no choice but to return to Birmingham & begins by making the rounds of Benny’s friends & colleagues. Sure, someone might know where he’s gone but it’s more than that. Wynn was never too concerned with motive in the past but this time he needs to understand why it happened to ensure he kills the right guy.

 

In alternate chapters we follow Benny as he goes on the run & begins a new life in another city. We also get the scoop on Benny’s relationship with Harry & how it all went wrong.

 

And that’s all I’ll say about the plot, folks. At face value, it’s a well written & pacy example of a great Brit Grit novel. What elevates this above many is the quiet & dignified depth provided by Wynn’s character. There’s no doubt he fits the definition of a bad guy. But as we accompany him on his search for Benny, another man emerges.

 

A solitary retirement & advancing age have given Wynn a chance to think about his life & the things he’s done. The passage of time affects all of us, shifting priorities & changing perceptions. Wynn is no different & he finds himself pondering the meaning of loyalty, friendship & right vs. wrong. Childhood memories bubble to the surface as he tries to remember when he last felt happiness. All of this plus his interactions with the people in Benny’s life combine to give a poignant portrait of an aging criminal who is running out of time.

 

I really enjoyed this. The characters are compelling & the author keeps you guessing as to how it will all pan out. By the time the music stopped, somehow I’d developed a big old soft spot for a hitman. Who’d of thunk it.

 

 

          

 

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?