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review 2019-10-10 19:09
Guide the future by the past
Ready Player One - Ernest Cline

I FINALLY read Ready Player One by Ernest Cline, y'all. I absolutely loved the film adaptation of it and while I also enjoyed the book (hold on to your seats, folks) I preferred the movie version. While the book was able to go into more details in terms of world building and the puzzle solving aspect of the plot I enjoyed the storyline of the movie more. [A/N: I don’t want to give the impression that I didn’t enjoy this reading experience because I definitely did but the film just has an extra oomph.] Additionally, the book's version of Halliday seemed cruel and cold whereas Morrow was a lot of fun (and mostly absent from the film's version). The hero of this dystopian novel, Wade Watts, is living in a world that has become entirely taken over by The Oasis which is a virtual reality environment where anyone can be anyone. The majority of the human race has been crammed into tiny communities that are stacked one on top of the other but their consolation is getting to live their dreams online. Even school is conducted in virtual schools! The creator of this world, James Halliday, passed from this mortal coil but left behind a grand prize (ownership of The Oasis) for anyone who manages to solve his puzzles and find the 3 hidden keys buried within The Oasis.


This is a boy's quest to pull himself from his dire circumstances while learning that he's got the 'right stuff'. (Did I mention this book is chock full of 80's references? I definitely downloaded some Rush albums after I finished reading it.) All in all, a really fun book. 9/10

 

A/N: Title courtesy of Rush "Bastille Day".

 

What's Up Next: A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Disappearing Earth by Julia Phillips

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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text 2019-04-03 11:03
Video Games Advertising Market Strategies, Trends & Opportunities Report 2018-2025

April 3, 2019: This report focuses on the global Video Games Advertising status, future forecast, growth opportunity, key market and key players. The study objectives are to present the Video Games Advertising development in United States, Europe and China.

 

Video games are electronic games that require a video device for the user interface of the game. The device can be a mobile display or a PC monitor, or a TV screen. Based on the electronic system employed, they are categorized in the form of platforms such as mobile, PC, and TV. Different types of games are available for a number of gaming platforms. Video games are available in two major formats - physical and digital. The physical format comes in the form of compact discs, which are used while playing the game. In the digital format, the game is downloaded and played.

 

Download sample Copy of This Report at: https://www.radiantinsights.com/research/global-video-games-advertising-market-size-status-and-forecast-2018-2025/request-sample

 

According to the report, one of the major drivers for this market is Increasing growth of the HDR technology. HDR is a technology for displaying a wider range of color tones with more emphasis on details.

 

In 2017, the global Video Games Advertising market size was xx million US$ and it is expected to reach xx million US$ by the end of 2025, with a CAGR of xx% during 2018-2025.

 

The key players covered in this study

  • BrightRoll
  • Flurry
  • Google
  • InMobi
  • AppNexus
  • Byyd
  • Fiksu

 

Read Complete Report With TOC @ https://www.radiantinsights.com/research/global-video-games-advertising-market-size-status-and-forecast-2018-2025

 

  • IAD
  • Kiip
  • Matomy Media
  • Millennial Media
  • Platform One
  • MobPartner
  • MoPub
  • Tapjoy
  • SpotXchange
  • Tremor Video
  • TubeMogul

 

Market segment by Type, the product can be split into

  • Reward-Based Video Game Advertising
  • Banner Video Game Advertising
  • Native Video Game Advertising

 

Market segment by Application, split into

  • Commercial
  • Service Industry
  • Manufacturing Industry
  • Others

 

Market segment by Regions/Countries, this report covers

  • United States
  • Europe
  • China
  • Japan
  • Southeast Asia
  • India
  • Central & South America

 

The study objectives of this report are:

  • To analyze global Video Games Advertising status, future forecast, growth opportunity, key market and key players.
  • To present the Video Games Advertising development in United States, Europe and China.
  • To strategically profile the key players and comprehensively analyze their development plan and strategies.
  • To define, describe and forecast the market by product type, market and key regions.

 

In this study, the years considered to estimate the market size of Video Games Advertising are as follows:

  • History Year: 2013-2017
  • Base Year: 2017
  • Estimated Year: 2018
  • Forecast Year 2018 to 2025

 

About Radiant Insights

Radiant Insights is a platform for companies looking to meet their market research and business intelligence requirements. We assist and facilitate organizations and individuals procure market research reports, helping them in the decision making process. We have a comprehensive collection of reports, covering over 40 key industries and a host of micro markets. In addition to over extensive database of reports, our experienced research coordinators also offer a host of ancillary services such as, research partnerships/ tie-ups and customized research solutions.

 

For More Information, Visit Radiant Insights

 

Contact:
Michelle Thoras
Corporate Sales Specialist, USA
Radiant Insights, Inc
Phone: 1-415-349-0054
Toll Free: 1-888-202-9519
Email: sales@radiantinsights.com    
Blog URL: http://ictmarketforecasts.wordpress.com

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review 2018-12-28 16:38
Game Slaves by Gard Skinner
Game Slaves - Gard Skinner

My copy of this is an ARC that I picked up at a conference four years ago. Yes, it took me this long to finally read it. Because it's an ARC, I won't be quoting from it.

Phoenix and his team spend their work days fighting battle after battle. Each time they die, they're regenerated. That's because they aren't people - they're the NPC enemies that human gamers try to defeat. The only difference between one day and the next is what game they're in. When Dakota, a new member, is added to Phoenix's team, things gradually start to fall apart.

Dakota won't stop asking questions. She has what she thinks are memories of a life prior to being in the game. Doesn't that mean she, and all of them, are really human? Doesn't that mean there's a life she could get back to? Phoenix tries to ignore her and concentrate on being the biggest, baddest opponent gamers have ever fought against, but then things start happening that even he can't explain away.

I went into this thinking it'd work reasonably well for me. I like "stuck in a video game" stories, and this seemed somewhat in the same vein. Unfortunately, I disliked Phoenix, who I assume was written to primarily appeal to male gamers. His idea of a good life was battles, good weapons, and Mi, his only female teammate prior to Dakota's arrival, tucked under his arm when she wasn't pulling off an impressive number of headshots. Although Dakota annoyed him, he gave her living quarters closer to his because he thought she was hot...which was weird since he acknowledged that all women in his game world were hot.

I spent a good chunk of the book thinking Dakota would have made a better POV character, but I doubt that would have made me like this book any better. She annoyed me almost as much as she annoyed Phoenix. But at least she was less passive than Phoenix, who was aware that things were going on around him that he knew nothing about but who did nothing to learn more about those things.

For a book that contained cannibals and a Mad Max-style dystopian wasteland, this was surprisingly boring. The pacing was really bad, and none of the characters felt like actual people. Part of the latter could have been due to Phoenix's POV. Mi, for example, came across as his token girlfriend. Why were the two of them together? She seemed more inclined to question things than him, and there were hints that she had thoughts and emotions he hadn't even tried to find out about. And yet the two of them stayed together. The only explanation I could think of was that Phoenix was team leader, and as team leader he was required to have a girlfriend. Which was...depressing.

The book's ending was garbage, a last-ditch effort to mess with readers. The result was hugely unsatisfying. Phoenix's shock and horror didn't exactly do much for my opinion of his intelligence, either. The ending he'd been about to have was filled with great big gaping plot holes (not to mention a stunning display of selfishness and wastefulness, but that's a whole other issue). It shouldn't have required dragging him over and rubbing his nose in them for him to see them.

Extras:

I don't know if these made it into the final book, but the ARC came with a few illustrations and stats for Phoenix and his teammates.

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

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review 2017-07-30 20:18
The Comic Book Story of Video Games
The Comic Book Story of Video Games: The Incredible History of the Electronic Gaming Revolution - Jonathan Hennessey,Jack Mcgowan

[I received a copy of this book through NetGalley.]

Fairly interesting, although to be honest, in spite of the early chapters being educative in their own ways, I would’ve preferred to see the focus more on the actual video games (and industry) themselves, rather than also on the electricity/industrial revolution parts. The art style, too, was not always consistent, and sometimes too stiff.

On the other hand, I appreciated the inclusion of actual video games characters in panels, as watchers or part of the ‘narrative’; just trying to remember or find out who they were, was in itself another, different dive into history. (Well, maybe it wouldn’t work that well on someone who knows less about such games, but for me, it worked.)

I also liked how the book included some of the backstage workings behind the whole video games industry; they were plenty of things I didn’t know, for instance Sony and its Playstation, I had no idea there had been a deal in the plans with Nintendo for CD games, and that it completely fell through. (I’m not feeling younger, though. Being reminded that this PSX I got in 1998—and I made it a point to get a US model, too, since the European one didn’t run the games I wanted—was even a few years older than that... well...)

Conclusion: An informative and colourful read. I do wish it had spent just a little less time on the really early years, where ‘games’ per se weren’t so much concerned (to be fair, I already know a lot about computer history in general).

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review 2017-03-06 15:08
Book Review: Console Wars by Blake J. Harris
Console Wars: Sega, Nintendo, and the Battle That Defined a Generation - Blake J. Harris

I came across this book a while ago and, growing up in a hardcore Nintendo family, I was interested in learning the history behind Sega and Nintendo, especially since I was a kid in the 90s and while I don’t quite remember how Sega became a thing, I remember it being novel to me when one of my friends said they had a Genesis rather than an SNES. It’s been sitting on my to-read list for quite a while and my interest in it was renewed when my husband (who’s way more knowledgeable about video games than even I am, and that’s saying something) decided to read it as one of his summer reads. After not too much cajoling by him, I finally picked it up to read it.

 

Console Wars is interesting, because while it mostly follows Kalisnke, who was the CEO who got Sega to become a household name, it’s not told in any sort of biography or memoir format and mostly heavily focuses on marketing, the partnerships between the different gaming companies, and the games/systems themselves. So, if you’re not interested in the history of video games or how feats of marketing can completely change a company, this book is very much not for you. I studied marketing at university, so reading the different techniques the companies used to get ahead was fascinating. Also, like I said, I come from a hardcore Nintendo family and grew up playing the NES and SNES (if I remember correctly, actually, my family purchased every single system Nintendo came out with), so it was fun to see things from the “competitor’s” side and also read about how Nintendo responded to what was happening.

 

Overall, this gives a fairly comprehensive look at how Sega and Nintendo originated and also touches on the history of some well-known video gaming companies like Electronic Arts and Namco. I love that the human element is included and we get to learn about who the people are that drove video game innovation, even while so many were saying that it was bound to die. It was a slow read for me, but I very much enjoyed the steady pacing and the sheer volume of information that this book contained.

Source: www.purplereaders.com/?p=3509
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