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review 2016-09-04 11:46
All the Rage - Courtney Summers

All The Rage has been on my radar for months. I've seen a few friends read it and I've had people recommend it to me. I knew I was going to read it. I just wasn't sure when.

 

I read it a little over a week ago and I can't stop thinking about this. I keep going back to this book, back to Romy and her story and the story of the other characters in this book. Including the characters I felt nothing but anger for.

 

This book was impossible for me to put down. Every time I told myself to take a break, that I was getting angry, I would keep reading. When it was almost finished and I didn't want it to be over soon, I urged myself to take a breather. But I didn't.

 

Once I was finished this book, I let out a big sigh and went over it all in my head.

 

The rage I felt while reading this lasted for hours after.

 

All The Rage is not an easy book. This is not the book to read if you want a sweet YA romance. Because this is not that story.

 

This is a story about rape. About rape culture. And about the aftermath for the victim of a rape, who is not believed for the most part and who has to live in a town where people judge her for telling the truth.

 

This book is brutal and real and honest. 

 

All The Rage is not a graphic book. But it doesn't need to be. Romy's thoughts and feelings alone are enough to leave an impact and enough to make me want to recommend this again and again.

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review 2016-06-29 09:31
All the Rage by Courtney Summers
All the Rage - Courtney Summers
You know all the ways you can kill a girl?
God, there are so many.


A lot can be said about All the Rage, but the word that comes to mind is safe. Which is insane, considering the themes this book deals with: rape, bullying, misogyny, murder, victim-blaming, and more. I'm still calling it safe, and let me explain why.

Personally, this felt like 'how to write feminist fiction 101'. (A good thing, of course. I rated the book three stars after all.) We need more feminist fiction. This book falls right into that category with tackling the themes mentioned above. Summers tells the tale of Remy, a young girl who was raped by the town's golden boy, and now she lives with the reality of how (some, even many) victims are treated. It's an honest and accurate portrayal, but it's also incredibly safe. There's little to Remy's personality that causes greater emotion in me. I feel for what she went through, but I don't necessarily care for Remy at any point in the story.

Also there's the problem of the secondary characters. None of them are fleshed out enough to make a lasting impression. Which might be a deliberate choice done by the author to remain focus on Remy, in the process of doing so it loses the dynamic these characters could've brought to the plot. Because this is a plot driven story, and yet, there are mostly erratic scenes that, at times, brings nothing or very little to the overall story. Add in that Remy is the only character with more than one dimension, it's hard to keep the story floating.

Despite of all that, the story is still good. As said, it's feminist fiction at its most basic, I feel. It's a safe story, and they are never brilliant, and while they can be boring, they are never bad. All the rage is a good story, but it's more of a social commentary on our society with its victim-blaming before anything else. Summers is a great writer and in this book she paints a haunting atmosphere, which alone makes this story worth your time.

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text 2016-01-26 00:03
Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Reads of 2015
The Start of Me and You - Emery Lord
The Truth About Forever - Sarah Dessen
Dare Me - Megan Abbott
Black Iris - Leah Raeder
Invisibility - Andrea Cremer,David Levithan
Glass - Ellen Hopkins
Faking Normal - Courtney C. Stevens
All the Rage - Courtney Summers
The Summer of Chasing Mermaids - Sarah Ockler
Golden Son - Pierce Brown

Hi all, Rose here with another Top Ten Tuesday entry.  This theme is brought to you by the Broke and the Bookish, and this week was a freebie entry, so I thought I'd do my top ten reads of 2015.  I'm still going to do a year end post, but it's still not compiled yet and I have a bit of catching up to do on my bookish profiles (I honestly didn't realize how far behind I was in keeping track of what I was reading last year.  Thankfully, I'm already doing a better job of that this year.)

 

So these aren't in any particular order and they aren't limited by publication year (as I'll do in my Best of 2015 entry).  These are all books I read in 2015 and ended up loving for what they offered.  All I ended up rating 4 stars or higher when I read them, with some books pending full reviews.  I hope you enjoy them as much as I did.

 

In no particular order:

 

The Start of Me and You - Emery Lord  

 

1. "The Start of Me and You" by Emery Lord - this was the first read I've ever had from Emery Lord, and I adored every moment of it, from the writing to the character relationships built and explored in the narrative.  Paige and Ryan's characters really leap off the page with their respective situations of grief and coming to terms, and I absolutely loved the realistic feel of Paige's circle of friends.

 

The Truth About Forever - Sarah Dessen 

 

2. "The Truth About Forever" by Sarah Dessen. Many people had begged me to pick up this book by Dessen since I was doing a binge reading of her books in 2015, and I wasn't disappointed in the least.  Loved the relationships of the characters, really identified with Macy's grief as she copes not only with the loss of her father, but also a broken relationship and trying to find her own identity.  Pretty updated cover as well.

 

Dare Me - Megan Abbott 

 

3. "Dare Me" by Megan Abbott - "Dare Me" completely blew me away as one of my earlier reads in the year.  I loved how it managed to immerse me in the overarching mystery surrounding the novel as well as how dark and layered its characters were showcased.  It's definitely one of my new favorite books, and the writing is absolutely fantastic.

 

Black Iris - Leah Raeder 

 

4. "Black Iris" by Leah Raeder - I keep thinking back to some of my favorite reads of 2015 in the New Adult category, and my mind keeps coming back to this.  Dark, lyrical writing, complex (and complicated) characters, deep sensuality that pops off the page, and just an overarching engaging read.  I did have some issues with how it marched toward the end, but the journey was so good that I would gladly pick up this novel again (and I ended up ordering a copy from Amazon even though I had gotten it from NetGalley as a galley.  Goes to show you that I do buy books based on how well they engage me even if I have a digital galley copy.

 

Invisibility - Andrea Cremer,David Levithan 

 

5. "Invisibility" by Andrea Cremer and David Levithan: Dude, I stayed away from this book for far too long because of the mixed reviews surrounding, and ended up loving it for the journey it offered.  I picked it up as an audio read from the library and loved the premise of a boy who's lived his whole life invisibie and the horrific curse that surrounds and threatens him.  I loved how wonderfully tense and palpable the scenes came across in this book, plus - magical realism?  Totally here for that.  I would still love to see a sequel of this if the authors could collaborate again. *crosses fingers*

 

Glass - Ellen Hopkins 

 

6. "Glass" by Ellen Hopkins.  This book broke my heart. As problematic and flawed as the protagonist in this novel is, it's a potent example of the cycle of addiction.  I also liked how it was formatted in a poetic style - which is one of my first loves in writing, but for anyone who may be deterred from it because of that - the audiobook does a wonderful job of pacing and enunciating the emotion behind it.

 

Faking Normal - Courtney C. Stevens 

 

7. "Faking Normal" by Courtney C. Stevens - a wonderfully potent book about a young woman living in the aftermath of her rape.  I actually rated "Blue-Haired Boy" (a companion novella to this story) a full five stars, but in considering it, I'd likely rate both of them among my favorite reads of 2015.  I'm definitely looking forward to reading more from Courtney C. Stevens in the future.

 

All the Rage - Courtney Summers 

 

8. "All the Rage" by Courtney Summers - I think I'll end up loving mostly anything Courtney Summers writes because of how intimate she is with her characterizations and the topics she expounds upon.  This was an emotional read in more ways than one on the topic of rape as well.  And it features a character of color (Leon) who was absolutely wonderful in his portrayal.

 

The Summer of Chasing Mermaids - Sarah Ockler 

 

9. "The Summer of Chasing Mermaids" by Sarah Ockler.  I squee with joy over this book, and continuously think it's underrated because not only does it feature an POC leading character, but it's just a wonderful coming of age summer story in general.  I feel like any review I write won't do it nearly enough justice, but I'm hoping to pen a review for it soon.  Indubitably one of my favorite reads of 2015, and I love Sarah Ockler's writing.

 

and last but not least *drumroll*....

 

Golden Son - Pierce Brown 

 

10. "Golden Son" by Pierce Brown: Yet another book I have yet to review in full, but I loved it just as much as its predecessor, if not a bit more.  And I'm eagerly anticipating the final book in the trilogy which releases this year.

 

 

That's all for now.  Until next entry,

Rose

 

 

 

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review 2015-09-27 03:17
All the Rage by Courtney Summers
All the Rage - Courtney Summers

This book made me feel ALL the rage. Throughout history, women have been restricted, and haven’t been given a lot of rights. We’re now in 2015, and sometimes, when you see what’s happening in the world, it’s hard to tell if society has changed for the better, or if it’s more ruthless. Women are still restricted by slut-shaming, physical domination, and, let’s not forget how easy it is to blame a girl for something that happens to her without consent.  

. . . how do you get a girl to stop crying?

You cover her mouth.

This book is one of the most dark, raw, and painful books that I’ve read this year. Yeah, I’ve read some pretty dark books this year. The thing different about this one is how scary and real it is. It’s so real, when I finished this book, I got chills and felt . . . I can’t even describe my emotions.

You know all the ways you can kill a girl?

God, there are so many.

This book is not for the light-hearted. This book shows you the god damn reality of exactly what happens in real life. Throughout the book, I would sometimes start feeling like crying because I hated it. I hated how real this book was, and people are so, so vicious.

 

I think I hate Sheriff Turner more than anyone in this entire book. Seriously, I guarantee you, if Romy would’ve said anyone but Kellan’s name, there would’ve been an effing investigation. Because in that case, Sheriff Turner wouldn't have had to choose. One tiny, tiny problem that I had, that I obviously don’t have anymore, is that the synopsis is slightly misleading. I’d assumed that Kellan is a huge part in this book, but that didn’t happen.

 

Yes, there’s a love story. Thankfully, it didn’t take up the entire book, and it has diversity! :D Also, the type of relationship that Romy and Leon have makes sense because, she still has scars over what happened to her, and I think that if anyone deserves Leon, it’s Romy. She deserves someone like him.

 

Overall, All the Rage is an amazing book about survival, and a tough world in which everything is portrayed so real! If you cannot handle tough books, then I would not recommend reading this. But if you’re looking for an honest, real read then read this book! I am definitely reading more of Courtney Summer’s standalones! :D

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text 2015-09-25 11:57
*Book Review* All The Rage by Courtney Summers
Title: All The Rage
Format: eArc
Pages: 336
Published: 13Th August 2015
Publisher:  Macmillan Children's books
Source: Netgalley
Genre: YA Contemporary
Shelfability: Borrow/Acquire
 
**About The Book**
"My dad used to say makeup was a shallow girl's sport, but it's not. It's armour."

Kellan Turner is not the golden boy everyone thinks he is and Romy Grey knows that for a fact. But when she speaks up, she is branded a liar. Telling the truth has cost her everything, because no one wants to believe a girl from the wrong side of town. But when news of Kellan assaulting another girl gets out, the cost of staying silent might be more than Romy can bear.

With a shocking conclusion and writing that will absolutely knock you out, All The Rage examines the shame and silence inflicted upon young women in a culture that refuses to protect them.

May contain slight spoilers. 
 
I have mixed feeling  about this book. On one hand the story is very powerful and beautifully written. However, on the other hand I felt like the ending didn't give the readers any kind of conclusion to how things end up. And it ruin the book slightly for me.
 
Source: weeshubbasworld.blogspot.co.uk/2015/09/book-review-all-rage-by-courtney-summers.html
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