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text 2019-02-18 21:52
Reading progress update: I've read 125 out of 240 pages.
Dead Man's Folly (Hercule Poirot, #31) - Agatha Christie

Ummm, okay.

 

“But if her fair hated the sight of him…” Hoskins dropped into the vernacular.

“All we know is that she said she did. Women,” said the inspector sententiously, “tell a lot of lies. Always remember that, Hoskins.”

“Aah,” said Constable Hoskins appreciatively.

 

I, unlike the Constable, am unappreciative of Inspector Bland's statement.

 

This, however, I appreciate very much:

 

“Well, I must be getting along. I’m a busy woman.”

“Of course. You have to talk to the Chief Constable about bloodhounds.”

Mrs. Masterton gave a sudden deep bay of laughter. “Used to breed ’em at one time,” she said. “People tell me I’m a bit like a bloodhound myself.”

Poirot was slightly taken aback and she was quick enough to see it. “I bet you’ve been thinking so, M. Poirot,” she said.

 

Hahahaha.

 

 

 
 
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text 2019-02-18 19:02
Reading progress update: I've read 99 out of 240 pages.
Dead Man's Folly (Hercule Poirot, #31) - Agatha Christie

“Hercule Poirot…I wonder now. Can it be the same man? A Belgian, a small man with a very big moustache?”

 

“An enormous moustache,” agreed Mrs. Oliver.

 

“Yes. Do you know him?” “It’s a good many years since I met him. I was a young sergeant at the time.”

 

I went googling to find any other book where Inspector Bland appears and came up empty aside from Hercule Poirot and the Greenshore Folly, which was the short story that was extended into this book.

 

But I found this nice little article about the Poirot adaptation:

 

Hercule Poirot Investigates His Last Mystery at Greenway

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text 2019-02-18 18:34
Reading progress update: I've read 67 out of 240 pages.
Dead Man's Folly (Hercule Poirot, #31) - Agatha Christie

Having read this before, I am picking up on so many clues that I missed in my first read! I remember now why I liked this one so much - it is just perfectly structured.

 

And Ariadne Oliver is so wonderful in this one!

 

“The fatal flaw, eh?” he remarked.

 

“That’s just it,” said Mrs. Oliver. “There always is one. Sometimes one doesn’t realize it until a book’s actually in print. And then it’s agony!” Her face reflected this emotion. She sighed. “The curious thing is that most people never notice it. I say to myself, ‘But of course the cook would have been bound to notice that two cutlets hadn’t been eaten.’ But nobody else thinks of it at all.”

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text 2019-02-18 18:15
Reading progress update: I've read 34 out of 240 pages.
Dead Man's Folly (Hercule Poirot, #31) - Agatha Christie

“But one shouldn’t be! In times of stress, when it’s a matter of life or death, one can’t think of one’s own insignificant ills or preoccupations.”

 

“I assure you, you are quite wrong. In the late war, during a severe air raid, I was much less preoccupied by the thought of death than of the pain from a corn on my little toe. It surprised me at the time that it should be so. ‘Think,’ I said to myself, ‘at any moment now, death may come.’ But I was still conscious of my corn—indeed, I felt injured that I should have that to suffer as well as the fear of death. It was because I might die that every small personal matter in my life acquired increased importance.

 

I feel like Christie is speaking from a direct personal experience here. And I love this, too.

 

“You are rather old-fashioned in your views, I think. Let’s hear what your slogan would be.”

 

“I do not need to formulate one of my own. There is an older one in this country which contents me very well.”

 

“What is that?”

 

“‘Put your trust in God, and keep your powder dry.’

 

Which feels so very stiff-upper-lip British, and so WWII.

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text 2019-02-18 18:01
Reading progress update: I've read 23 out of 240 pages.
Dead Man's Folly (Hercule Poirot, #31) - Agatha Christie

Look at the economy with which Christie creates a completely singular character:

 

Mrs. Masterton was a somewhat monumental woman who reminded Poirot faintly of a bloodhound. She had a full underhung jaw and large, mournful, slightly blood-shot eyes

 

She bowed and resumed her discourse in a deep voice which again made Poirot think of a bloodhound’s baying note.

 

“This silly dispute about the tea tent has got to be settled, Jim,” she said forcefully. “They’ve got to see sense about it. We can’t have the whole show a fiasco because of these idiotic women's local feuds."
 
I can just see her.
 
 
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