logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: fifth-grade
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
text 2017-04-04 20:56
To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee

Harper Lee’s classic novel To Kill a Mockingbird is a story of distinguishing between what is morally right and wrong. The book is set during the time of the Great Depression, and it is told from the perspective of a little girl called Scout. Her father, Atticus Finch, is asked to be the attorney for an African American male who is being convicted of raping a white woman. Scout learns some of the true realities of racism throughout the course of the novel as their family receives many threats for her father representing this man. Ultimately, the moral of the story explains to all readers that we must always try to do the right thing, no matter what the outcome may be, as opposed to standing by and watching dreadful things happen to innocent people. The book’s Lexile reading level is 790L, and it is recommended to be read by students in fifth grade and up. In my classroom, I would want my students to do a scrapbook activity for this book. In each chapter, I would assign them a specific project to do. For example, students could create their own bookmark to start the book. On the bookmark, they could write character names, or draw pictures of the beginning setting. Students would complete each assignment for each chapter, and add their finished product into their scrapbook. At the end of the book reading, students would turn their scrapbooks in for a grade, but they would also present their work to the class. Each book will be unique to each individual student.

Like Reblog Comment
text 2017-03-28 23:59
The Diary of a Young Girl - B.M. Mooyaart,Eleanor Roosevelt,Anne Frank

Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl was written during the period of World War II. Anne Frank was a thirteen-year-old Jewish girl whose family fled their home to hide from the Nazis who were occupying nearby territories. Her family lived in an attic for years hiding from the Gestapo who would seize them if they were to be found. Eventually, their whereabouts were betrayed, but Anne’s diary was found in that attic where it has become a world classic in history. The book’s Lexile reading level is 1080L. This would definitely be a book read no earlier than about fifth grade. Personally, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book when I was growing up. It opened my eyes to the horrors of our world’s history, and it showed me so much more than a school textbook ever could. In my classroom, I would use this book to discuss historical events that occurred during World War II. Students would be assigned this book to read, and I would want them to complete a research project on this particular time period. Students could write an essay, create a Prezi presentation, or draw a picture book to explain events that occurred. They could complete this from different perspectives, such as that of an American soldier, a German soldier, or maybe a Jewish child or adult. I would really want my students to dive into the historical information from this time period so they could connect with the history that took place.

Like Reblog Comment
text 2017-03-28 23:56
Bud, Not Buddy - Christopher Paul Curtis

Bud, Not Buddy was written by Christopher Paul Curtis and is the story of a little boy trying to find his place in a world where he does not know his own father. His mother died when he was younger, but he never knew his father at all. Bud grew up in the foster care system, bouncing from one foster home to the next. To Bud, it seemed as though no one would ever want him. However, this little boy has got some wits about him to be so young. He is sent to a new foster family that ends up locking him in their shed for the night. Bud’s imagination gets the best of him when he thinks there might be vampires in there, and he ends up swinging a bat at a hornet’s nest. He finds a way to bust out of the shed, torn up by multiple hornet stings, and runs away to go on his own adventure. It is quite dangerous for Bud to be striking out on his own, but he sets off on a journey to find his father. This book’s Lexile reading level is 950L, and it is recommended for students in higher grades such as fourth or fifth. One of the things that Bud constantly talks about throughout the novel is his “Rules and Things for a Funner Life”. I would want my students to brainstorm some ideas and create a list for this. However, instead of doing “Rules and Things for a Funner Life”, we could do “Rules and Things for a Funner [Classroom]”. I would read this book at the beginning of the school year with my students and we could create our classroom rules for the year based on these lists.

Like Reblog Comment
text 2017-03-28 23:52
Charlotte's Web - E.B. White,Garth Williams,Rosemary Wells

A teacher can never go wrong with introducing E.B. White’s classic novel, Charlotte’s Web, to the classroom. It is the story of a little pig who is the runt of its litter but is rescued by the farmer’s daughter, Fern. She takes responsibility for the pig and decides to raise it herself. Growing ever so fond of the little pig, Fern decides to name him Wilbur. Eventually, Wilbur grows up to be a regular sized pig, but he is forced to go live at the Zuckerman’s home when Fern’s parents tell her she can no longer take care of him like a baby. Fern still visits him every day at his new farm home. On the farm, Wilbur makes many new friends, but discovers frightening news that he will be sent to the slaughterhouse by Christmas. It is up to him and his newest acquaintance, Charlotte, to save his life. Charlotte is the sweetest spider that Wilbur has ever encountered, and she plans to save his life by weaving words about Wilbur into her web. She acts not only as a friend, but also as a mother figure to Wilbur when Fern does not come and visit as often. The book’s Lexile reading level is 680L, and it is best read and understood by children in third grade and up. One activity that I want to incorporate into my classroom for this book would be a sight word spider web. We could read this book in the beginning of the school year, and create a spider web in one corner of the classroom. Throughout the year, we could add words into the web that are important sight words for the students to remember. This would be a great visual for all students!

Like Reblog Comment
text 2017-03-28 23:45
The Graveyard Book - Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman’s novel The Graveyard Book tells the story of a little boy named Nobody Owens, or “Bod” for short, who was not raised under normal circumstances. After wandering from his crib in the middle of the night as a baby, he unknowingly escapes from a murderer in his house. The murderer is still on the loose throughout the course of the novel, and he is in search of Bod. While he is growing up, he is raised in a graveyard by ghosts who educate him on how to protect himself from the man who is out to kill him. You may be thinking by this point: why would anyone consider this to be a children’s book? Surprisingly enough, the book is an amazing story for young readers! Bod demonstrates courage throughout the novel, never allowing the man who wants to kill him to succeed with the job. The book’s Lexile reading level is 820L, and it is recommended to be read by students in higher grades like fourth and fifth grade. In my classroom, I would want students to form book groups to read the novel. I would want each student in the group to have a job to do with the book, and each group would get to engage in their own discussions about what they think. I would also want the students to analyze how Gaiman appeals to his reader’s senses through his strategic use of imagery.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?