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review 2017-12-14 20:57
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Review)
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire - J.K. Rowling

You guys, I have good news! There here is a Harry Potter book I actually liked! You were beginning to think it wasn’t going to happen, huh?

 

My string of short reviews isn’t over quite yet, since I finished this book more than a year ago. I have definitely learned my lesson that my reviews are next to worthless if they aren’t written within at least a month of finishing the book (unless I’ve taken extremely detailed notes, which I certainly didn’t do here). Considering I’ve been a few chapters into Order of the Phoenix for almost a year now, I might just reread this one to get back into the swing of things; if that’s the case, I’ll definitely write a more detailed review then!

 

This is where Rowling’s writing finally begins to mature and Harry starts to feel some genuine emotion. Goblet of Fire has always been my favorite of the Harry Potter films, and I’m incredibly relieved that I enjoyed the book. The overall plot of the series finally began to kick in, and it felt much less like a string of happy-go-lucky mysteries than the first three books. My biggest complaint with the series has been that I don’t love Rowling’s writing (still true) and I feel I have no emotional connection with Harry. While my feelings on the writing haven’t changed quite yet, I am ecstatic to see development from Harry, and I’m thrilled to know that whatever happens in the next book, at least I’ll finally see Harry actual feel something genuine and realistic. This book cracked him open so much more, and it’s nice to begin to feel excited again about reading these books, which I know contain stories I already love.

 

Overall: The more I think about it, the more I believe I should reread this book before diving into Order of the Phoenix again, just so I can get the excitement back again (and write a better review than this). I was told when I started the series that I should consider just skipping to Goblet of Fire, and boy, turns out they were right! I’m finally excited to be reading Harry Potter instead of wondering why I don’t just watch the movies instead.

 

Read the review on my blog:

http://thaliasbooks.tumblr.com/post/168547037247/harry-potter-and-the-goblet-of-fire-review

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review 2017-12-08 23:46
Charm School Night Play: Lesson 3
Charm School Night Play: Lesson 3 (Volume 3) - Lynn Carmer

Title:  Charm School Night Play:  Lesson 3

Author:  Lynn Carmer

Publisher: Lynn Carmer        

Reviewed By:  Arlena Dean

Rating: Five

Review:

 

"Charm School Night Play:  Lesson 3  by Lynn Carmer


My Thoughts.....

 

I found this novel a very good read where you will find Athena one control person that will find at times  leave you shaking your head.  And then their was Tommy who you may find him him losing his temper at times but when it came to what he wanted he would definitely be found going after it and not taking no for a answer.  I did find several scenes that had me laughing so very hard.  Yes, this was quite a enjoyable read.  I liked the way this author wrote and separated the l's.  I could read it and thoroughly understand the story quite well and even thinking it was uniquely done. 

I found most of the characters somewhat complex but still so very interesting that will definitely keep you turning the pages to see what is coming next.

 

So, will Athena finally get the happiness she so well deserved?  With these two having that sizzling chemistry will they both who have had some many personal problems be able to finally get their HEA?  To find out you will have to pick up "Charm School Night Play:  Lesson 3" to find out.  Would I recommend?  YES!

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review 2017-12-08 22:25
Death Comes to the School (Kurland St. Mary Mystery, #4)
Death Comes to the School - Catherine Lloyd

I caught a cold a few weeks ago that I thought I'd kicked to the curb after only 4 days, only to have it come raging back a week later in the form of a cough that will. not. die.  I've sounded like a barking seal for the last 8 days and yesterday, to add insult to injury, I got a skull cracking headache, too, leaving me feeling like every time I coughed I was going to end up like those people in the X-files, whose brains exploded out their ears.

 

So even though I have 3 other books currently going, I needed something very easy on both my brain and my eyes.  Death Comes to the School was a perfect fit with it's on-the-large-side-of-average typeface and it's very familiar backdrop and characters.  It allowed me to forget for a time about the icepack wrapped around my head and the cough lozenges that have stained my tongue purple (black elderberry). 

 

The story starts off 3 years after the last book;  why don't authors of series do this more often?  It makes everything that happens so much more believable; rather than have a village of death, you're backdrop is just a village where normal stuff happens.  Anyway, the murder happens fairly quickly, to a school teacher nobody liked, and it happens rather oddly, with a hat pin in her neck and a pen in her eye.  From this point, the author has a bit of fun twisting the character stereotypes of the time around and using them to her advantage.  The mystery plotting of the book is really very good, although the motivation tie-in at the end was a tad weak.

 

The character angst though, I could have done without.  I really like Robert and Lucy, both individually and together but this book ... this book turn them into cardboard cliches, all because Lucy has yet to produce an heir.  This is an historically accurate issue; childbirth was a treacherous business and entailments created situations where entire villages depended on one poor woman to produce a son.  I get that.  But the whole emotional miscommunication thing that bogged down this story was stupid; for two characters that talked and argued about everything incessantly in the first three books, the whole "doesn't she want me?" "he doesn't desire me anymore, I'm a failure" let's-not-talk thing was just annoying.  

 

There was more to like than not, though, and as a nice bonus, the book takes place during Christmas, so it was seasonal too!  This has been a solid series so far and I'm already looking forward to the next one, which will undoubtably continue to revolve around heirs and spares, but hopefully without all the silly angst.

 

Book themes for St. Martin’s Day: Read a book set  before the age of electricity. 

 

 

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text 2017-12-07 02:59
Only evil villains need apply.
A School for Villains (Dark Lord Academy) - Leo DeBruyn,Ardyth DeBruyn

This was a fun sort of retelling of Harry Potter.  

Except it's for 'Slytherines' only!  Sot hey can learn to be evil villains.

Although a 'Gryffindor' has managed to infiltrate the school.  

Because he doesn't want to be a hero, he wants to be a villain.  

And the villain doesn't want to be a villain, but doesn't really want to be a hero either.

Mostly he just want to go home.

 

An almost direct scene involves a troll being set loose in the history dept.

I laughed out loud.

 

However, I really want to know what's up with Igor.

We encounter him once and he's intriguing, but he never shows up again.

 

 

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review 2017-12-07 00:30
Necromancy and toilet humour make for surprisingly good MG
The Silver Mask (Magisterium, Book 4) (The Magisterium) - Holly Black,Cassandra Clare

This latest entry in wonderful MG magic-school series Magisterium balances some seriously dark themes and action with laugh-out-loud lines.

 

The first book or two's Harry Potter overtones with all the joy of discovering a new magic world were more fun, to be honest, but as the penultimate book, I can see how things are ramping up. I

 

'd say this is borderline YA - as the kids move on through the school years/grades, they're heading into teen territory, adding kissing and mild romance angst to death, identity crises, and necromancy. I'd recommend for older kids, maybe 10 or even 12+. But the relatively simple language and style of expression are solidly middle grade. Looking forward to the big wrap up in book 5!

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