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review 2018-02-12 23:00
Bikers, escorts, and a detective with a conscience in hipster Vancouver
Invisible Dead - Sam Wiebe

I do read mysteries, but I don't tend to read the gritty crime/noir genre. Too dark, in most cases. I loved this, though. 

 

Wiebe captures the culture, ephemera, and atmosphere of Vancouver with endless telling details, making his narrative about crime and the seedy, dark underbelly of the city all the more alarming. Reads smoothly and convincingly, with all-too-recognizable characters. The endless men (and some women) dismissing the harm they do to others, particularly to the most vulnerable (and often First Nations and visible minority) women, are the company owners I've worked with and for, the powerful and dismissive, the entitled and self-satisfied, and most of all, the casually careless.

 

The specificity of eating out in Vancouver and enjoying the views are so common in the city as to be living stereotypes, and the friendly familiarity of the lifestyle and location details drives the knife in even further as one character after another drives the women who've suffered in this book, and on our streets in real life, further into the mud.

 

I prefer reading mysteries set in exotic foreign places and times. New York. Chicago. London. Paris. 1920s. 1940s. A crime novel calling out not only the shady hidden figures of my Vancouver, but all of us in the city, privileged and struggling alike, for glossing past, stepping over, and treating with casual disdain and irresponsibility the ones having the hardest time surviving, hits far too close to home. But there's a balance of hope and tenacity in this book that keeps the darkness from feeling entirely crushing. So I'll read more of Wiebe's work, if only to remind myself of the faces, the voices, and the stories I need to not forget.

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text 2018-02-09 02:52
Reading progress update: I've read 30 out of 608 pages.
Invisible Man - Ralph Ellison

Started this today while waiting on an ever slow queue to pay my bills (yeah, I'm all for fitting dissonances with my reads lately). And I wish I'd brought it with me  to the bank too (those were two long hours of waiting).

 

Got to the rink, and the electrified rug, and damn. Those older guys. Damn.

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url 2018-01-30 19:22
69 new today in book series
Dark in Death - J.D. Robb
Still Me: A Novel - Jojo Moyes
Beyond Danger - Kat Martin
The Invisible Planet - Geronimo Stilton
Judgment Road - Christine Feehan
Stormspeaker - Christina Diaz Gonzalez
Alpha's Mate - Eve Langlais
Moonlight Sins - Jennifer L. Armentrout
Zero Hour (Wired & Dangerous) - Megan Erickson
A Devil in Scotland: A No Ordinary Hero Novel - Suzanne Enoch

For complete list, checkout FictFact.com's Book Release Calendar.  (If link doesn't work or you lose this post, it's under the "Explore" menu.) 

Source: www.fictfact.com/BookReleaseCalendar
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review 2018-01-28 00:00
The Heart's Invisible Furies
The Heart's Invisible Furies - John Boyne “You’ve done nothing since we first met but make me like you. Despite my best efforts. And it’s quite annoying, actually, because I was determined to hate you.”
“And I was equally determined to love you.”


I have very few ways to put this book into words, and I will not attempt to. There are many other reviews. For now, I'll say it's incredible and that I loved it. It's everything I want a book to be and it's masterful. It's straight to the favorites shelf.

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review 2018-01-26 16:00
Have you?
Have You Filled a Bucket Today? A Guide to Daily Happiness for Kids - Carol McCloud

This story is a great way to show how random acts of kindness, smiling at someone, giving compliments, or helping someone in some way can go so far! "Have You Filled a Bucket Today?" paints a picture that everyone has an invisible bucket that is always with them. This bucket carries their happiness and good thoughts, but when it is empty they are sad. You can spread joy and happiness just by being kind. This book will go hand in hand with the fairly new program that most school are doing, Leader In Me and the 7 habits. Several schools have adopted this program and really pushing being a leader and being kind to one another. One term they use is called an "emotional bank account" which is exactly like the invisible bucket in this story. This book is a great example for students to picture everyone's feelings being in that bucket. I think it helps them connect the idea instead of just telling them to be kind. I would read this book to any grade level. It is a great reminder, even for adults!

 

Lexile: AD710L

 

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