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Search tags: kindergarten
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review 2017-04-08 03:48
Miss Bindergarten Gets Ready for Kindergarten - Joseph Slate,Ashley Wolff

"Miss. Bindergarten Gets Ready For Kindergarten" is a great book to read on a first day of school to show the students how the teacher Miss. Bindergarten how to prepare for her class and how her students were very excited about coming to school. In the story Miss Bindergaren prepares her kindergarten classroom while her new kindergartens get ready for kindergarten. The author, Joseph Slate, used begging sounds to flow along and rhyming words to help keep readers engaged. I think this book will make students more excited about their first day at kindergarten. I can use this book in my classroom for an alphabet lesson or a back to school lesson. 

RL:1.3

LS:GLE

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review 2017-04-02 22:03
The Ugly Duckling
The Ugly Duckling - Jerry Pinkney,Hans Christian Andersen

The Ugly Duckling has been around for over a hundred years and has many different versions. It is a person favorite with mine and this version stays true in the timeless tale of a very awkward duckling that does not fit in with his brothers and sisters. This little bird is made fun of and has to struggle through life without a great support system to back him up. However, through the endless tormenting of his fellow ducklings, the hunters, and cruel seasons he survives. Not only does he survive but he grows up to become a graceful swan. This story in the end has a happy ending but it is the journey to get there that brings the story to life and reminds the reader that life is not always easy. Sometimes we will have to struggle and work hard for what we want. In the classroom I would use this story to focus on sequencing and working with the students to focus what happens in the story and when does it happen. This could easily be done by having the students cut out pictures or drawing pictures that represent what happens in the story in the correct order it happens.

Reading Level: Kindergarten to 3rd grade

LEX AD 650L

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text 2017-03-28 23:32
Library Lion - Michelle Knudsen,Kevin Hawkes

Library Lion, by Michelle Knudsen, is the perfect story to introduce manners of the library to your students. This book's Lexile reading level is 470L, and it would be of the greatest benefit to preschoolers or kindergartners. The central focus of the story is on this lion who ventures into the library one day. The librarian, Miss Merriweather, is strict when it comes to following the rules in the library. When the lion wanders in, most people are panicking about the fact that a lion is walking around. Miss Merriweather tells everyone that he is only allowed to stay as long as he follows the rules. The library must be quiet at all times, and there is no running allowed. The lion proves to be of big help to the librarian and all of the people working there. His big feet are surprisingly quiet on the library floor, and he loves to be a comfy backrest for all of the children who come for story hour. He always makes sure that he is following the rules, but one day an emergency happens. Readers must ask themselves: are there good reasons to sometimes break the rules? This story would be perfect to read to preschoolers or kindergartners who have never been to the library before. It shows the rules that most libraries require students to follow, but it also helps them see that sometimes it is okay to break those rules when emergencies happen. I would read this book to my students before they took a trip to the library during the first few days of school. We could talk about the rules and mannerisms of the library, and then we could all take a class field trip to explore it together!

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text 2017-03-28 23:28
There is a Bird on Your Head! - Mo Willems

In another one of Mo Willem’s classic tales, There is a Bird on Your Head!, Piggie and Elephant are back again, but this time they have got trouble! A bird has decided to land on Elephant’s head, and it does not look like it will be leaving anytime soon. The first bird is joined by another bird, those birds make a nest, and before Elephant knows it, he’s got three baby birds on his head! But how can he make them go away? This book’s Lexile reading level is 210L, and it would be great for younger readers in preschool or kindergarten. This story would be great to talk about sequencing with students. You could print out pictures that are descriptive of the text, and allow students to put the pictures in the order in which they occur. This book is one that teachers should try and be theatrical with. Because it is a simple book to read and understand, teachers should really be over-the-top in how they read the story so it could be more entertaining for students. I would suggest maybe using some puppets to read, or making different expressions in your vocal tones.

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text 2017-03-28 23:23
Should I Share My Ice Cream? - Mo Willems

Mo Willem’s book, Should I Share My Ice Cream?, is a classic tale of contemplation by the main character, Elephant. On one hot day, he decides to go set some ice cream for himself. However, Elephant wonders if he should keep the ice cream to himself. Why not share his ice cream with his best friend, Piggie? He contemplates for the longest time about what he should do, but does he wait too long? After all, it does not take ice cream long to melt down! This book’s Lexile reading level is 180L, and it would be something that younger students in preschool or kindergarten would enjoy. In the classroom, this book would be great to talk about sharing with friends. Students could brainstorm items that would be good to share with their friends, and maybe some items that would not be such a good idea to share. The students could then have a day where they bring an item to class that they would like to share with friends, and one item they want to show but keep to themselves.

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