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review 2018-04-13 18:25
Judy Moody Saves The World, Megan McDonald
Judy Moody Saves The World! - Megan McDonald,Peter H. Reynolds

This middle school age book was fun. I received it for free and voluntarily chose to review it. While it was fun with a lot of action, the characters lacked any real depth. I would have liked to see a little more. While it was centered on recycling and saving the world, I would have liked to have answers as to why. I would hope that this would make some of our teenagers think about it more. Because it was a little fun and a good subject matter, I've given this a 4* rating and I'll be sharing this with my grandchildren.

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review 2018-04-09 19:39
Deep Fried Trouble - Tyora Moody

 

Widowed, retired and with grown children living on their own, Eugeena Patterson searches for ways to make her life less mundane. For three years she headed her neighborhood watch and just recently a handsome widower, Amos Jones moves in next door and they both are interested.

On one of Eugeena's daily walks she notices her once close friend's dog running loose in the yard. Knowing that's unusual, she looks into the situation and discovers her friend dead. Still shaken from the murder so close to home, Leesa, Eugeena's daughter visits with her children, but disappears without any explanation, leaving Eugeena to take care of her grandchildren. Determined to find out who murdered her estranged friend, she also probes into the whereabouts of her daughter disappearance and why.

I enjoyed this first in the Eugeena Patterson mystery series. Eugeena's character was relatable. I connected well with her character, because I'm a mother and grandmother and will do whatever it takes to protect the ones I love. Most of the characters were represented well, but a couple of them
I wished were developed more. Whenever Eugeena and Amos were together, I felt a smile cross my face.

I was pleased with the beginning of the story. No fluff to build up to the plot, straight to the point. The story flowed smoothly without any need to read over or skip pages to find out what happened next. However, discovering the murderer needed more strength. I knew who it was right away in the story and I like to be challenged.

If you enjoy a good, warm cozy mystery or a mystery in general, I recommend Deep Fried Trouble. A story of friendship, family and a sprinkle of romance.

 

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review 2018-03-28 03:42
Judy Moody #1 by Megan McDonald, Peter H. Reynolds (Illustrator)

Why yes, I am an adult who reads children books.

 

930612

 

I will be 80 and still reading picture books. It doesn't matter that books like this are targeted toward preteens or teenagers. I think it is sad if we get to a point in our life where we say "Well I'm XX now, can no longer enjoy that thing I used to enjoy..." It's fine if we naturally outgrow things of course, but don't force yourself to do so if you don't want to.

Judy Moody is a series I could have read when I was around the "right" age, not a preteen, but a teenager. I never read it because of pressure of trying to read things for my age or things that were above my reading level.

I was Judy's age once. It is fun to read about her silly adventures and put myself in her shoes. I never want to get to the point where I can't relate to younger (or older) characters.

Judy and her family are great. Kids of all ages, and kids at heart should get to know them.

*I read this twice. Once from the library and once provided by Netgally*

Source: www.goodreads.com/book/show/930612.Judy_Moody
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review 2018-03-27 00:00
Sleeper(s)
Sleeper(s) - Paul Kane,David Moody,Joe (... Sleeper(s) - Paul Kane,David Moody,Joe (Crystal Lake) Mynhardt Sleeper(s) has a sweet blurb, a great opening, much with the creepy-assed ‘here be monsters’ feeling town, and a solid threat against life on Earth.  It moved fast, it ratcheted up the threat level, and demanded your attention for all 184 pages. It’s also nicely copy-edited and proofread, and has a neat cover to boot.

Even with the fact that I pretty much loathed all the characters except for two (neither being the main), I was still interested in the story. The main character, Andrew Strauss, made me want to punch him in the face. That, or hire someone to give him the Wedgie from Hell every single day of his existence, and once more before he was buried. I understand why he was written the way he was, and it just goes to illustrate to me that I was never meant to have a Prince Charming, because I’d have decked the guy before three days were through.

The way Paul Kane described everything that happened in Middletown was fantastic. It had some serious Silent Hill vibe-age going on. I’m pretty sure the first time the infection showed it power, I would have screamed, pissed myself, and ran off like the half-naked chick in the opening scenes of a slasher flick. The man can set a scene like you wouldn’t believe. Sweet baby Cthulhu. Too bad this was a fairy-tale retelling instead of a straight-out horror tale. Because as straight up horror, not bowing to the rules of fairy-tale, I would have liked it a lot more.

For most of the story, Sleeper(s) is a fantastically twisted fairy-tale re-imagining. In fact, it’s too easy to forget at times that this is a Sleeping Beauty re-telling. As a reader being guided along the plot by Kane, you can’t help but expect the feces to hit the fan in a grand fashion. Until he reminds you, abruptly, that it is a fairy-tale retelling. And then all your hopes and dreams for the story seep out of you in the painful imitation of the morning visit to the loo after a Taco Bell and beer binge. Okay, so it wasn’t quite that bad, but there was disappointment to be had!

There was a lot about Sleeper(s) to like. I think it’s admirable that Paul Kane managed to keep me interested enough to read the whole book even with his cast of thoroughly irritating characters. And it’s a short, quick read that you could pick up over a week’s worth of lunches at work. However, my blackened, shrunken little heart just isn’t meant for fairy-tale retellings. And I’m a grouch about epilogues in general, so the end of the book took a lot of the enjoyment out of it for me. It’s not for everyone, though, and I’m unfortunately one of them.
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text 2017-12-11 19:38
12 New December Books
Year One - Nora Roberts
The Pug Who Bit Napoleon: Animal Tales of the 18th and 19th Centuries - Mimi Matthews
One of Us Will Be Dead by Morning (The Final War) - David Moody
Winds of the Forest (Forestborn Book 1) - Dele Daniel
If the Fates Allow - Killian B. Brewer,Lynn Charles,Erin Finnegan,Pene Henson,Lilah Suzanne,Annie Harper
Gun Kiss - Khaled Talib
Enchantress of Numbers: A Novel of Ada Lovelace - Jennifer Chiaverini
The Girl in the Tower - Katherine Arden
No Time to Spare: Thinking About What Matters - Ursula K. Le Guin,Karen Joy Fowler
Taming the Alpha (Balls & Chains 2) - Amara Lebel

Winter is here. The days are getting shorter, the weather's getting chiller and we cannot find a better way out of this situation than hiding under a blanket with a book pile nearby. If you're looking for some new titles for your December reading, have a look at the following 12 new releases and let us know what are you reading this winter season.

 

 

Year One by Nora Roberts 

A stunning new novel from the #1 New York Times bestselling author—an epic of hope and horror, chaos and magick, and a journey that will unite a desperate group of people to fight the battle of their lives. 

 

Preorder ->

The Pug Who Bit Napoleon: Animal Tales of the 18th and 19th Centuries by Mimi Matthews 

From elaborate Victorian cat funerals to a Regency era pony who took a ride in a hot air balloon, Mimi Matthews shares some of the quirkiest—and most poignant—animal tales of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Meet Fortune, the Pug who bit Napoleon on his wedding night, and Looty, the Pekingese sleeve dog who was presented to Queen Victoria after the 1860 sacking of the Summer Palace in Peking. The four-legged friends of Lord Byron, Emily Brontë, and Prince Albert also make an appearance, as do the treasured pets of Alexander Pope, Samuel Johnson, and Charles Dickens. Less famous, but no less fascinating, are the animals that were the subject of historical lawsuits, scandals, and public curiosity. Preorder->

 

 

 

One of Us Will Be Dead by Morning by David Moody 

In One of Us Will Be Dead by Morning, David Moody returns to the world of his Hater trilogy with a new fast-paced, and wonderfully dark story about humanity's fight for survival in the face of the impending apocalypse.

 

 

New release & Giveaway

Winds of the Forest by Dele Daniel 

In the only surviving part of the earth sits the post-apocalyptic West-African kingdom of Nayja. In the only place where humans still exist lives four tribes, the Kingfishers, the Ammirians, the Rowans and the Arnazuris but one tribe is dominant and must remain so.

 

 

If the Fates Allow by Annie Harper 

During the holidays, anything is possible—a second chance, a promised future, an unexpected romance, a rekindled love, or a healed heart. Authors Killian B. Brewer, Pene Henson, Erin Finnegan, Lilah Suzanne, and Lynn Charles share their stories about the magic of the season.

 

 

Gun Kiss by Khaled Talib 

A stolen piece of history, an abducted actress and international intrigue… When the Deringer pistol that shot Abraham Lincoln is stolen and ends up in the hands of a Russian military general, covert agent Blake Deco is tasked by the FBI to head to the Balkans to recover the historical weapon. Meanwhile, the United States media is abuzz with news of the mysterious disappearance of Hollywood movie star, Goldie St. Helen. 

  

 

Enchantress of Numbers by Jennifer Chiaverini 

The New York Times bestselling author of Mrs. Lincoln's Dressmaker illuminates the fascinating life of the world’s first computer programmer Ada Byron King, Countess of Lovelace—a woman whose exceptional contributions to science and technology have gone unsung for too long.

 

Preorder->

The Last Governor: Chris Patten and the Handover of Hong Kong by Jonathan Dimbleby 

1 July 1997 marked the end of British rule of Hong Kong, whereby this territory was passed into the hands of the People’s Republic of China. In 1992, Chris Patten, former chairman of the Conservative Party, was appointed Hong Kong's last governor, and was the man to oversee the handover ceremony of this former British colony. Within the last five years of British rule, acclaimed journalist Jonathan Dimbleby was given unique access to the governor which enabled him to document the twists and turns of such an extraordinary diplomatic, political and personal drama. Preorder->

 

 

Taming the Alpha by Amara Lebel 

Welcome to Balls & Chains, a BDSM Club for gay men. Cross the threshold and see the worlds of humans and shifters collide as these alphas dominate, and betas submit.

 

 

The Girl in the Tower by Katherine Arden 

A remarkable young woman blazes her own trail, from the backwoods of Russia to the court of Moscow, in the exhilarating sequel to Katherine Arden’s bestselling debut novel, The Bear and the Nightingale.

 

 

Killman Creek by Rachel Caine 

Every time Gwen closed her eyes, she saw him in her nightmares. Now her eyes are open, and he’s not going away. Gwen Proctor won the battle to save her kids from her ex-husband, serial killer Melvin Royal, and his league of psychotic accomplices. But the war isn’t over. Not since Melvin broke out of prison. Not since she received a chilling text.

 

 

No Time to Spare by Ursula K. Le Guin

Ursula K. Le Guin has taken readers to imaginary worlds for decades. Now she’s in the last great frontier of life, old age, and exploring new literary territory: the blog, a forum where her voice—sharp, witty, as compassionate as it is critical—shines. No Time to Spare collects the best of Ursula’s online writing, presenting perfectly crystallized dispatches on what matters to her now, her concerns with this world, and her unceasing wonder at it: “How rich we are in knowledge, and in all that lies around us yet to learn. Billionaires, all of us.”

 

Happy reading!

 

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