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review 2017-11-11 16:49
Political Thriller Writing at Its Best
Murder at Broadcast Park (Broadcast Murd... Murder at Broadcast Park (Broadcast Murder) - Bill Evans

The Chaos of Change is political thriller writing at its best, and is set in America's near future, when states that see the collapse of federal power move to become more autonomous, and when a political move to dissolve the ineffective federal structure divides the country into three sovereign entities.

 

Thaddeus had a promising career in politics as the son of the former President of the U.S. before he saw the winds of chaos and fled to Alaska to live a solitary life away from his politically bickering family, but it's not long before government forces come looking for him, recruiting him as a negotiator between his Republican family and the liberals to the north, who are now butting heads over their new realms.

 

The elite team tapping Thaddeus for help is committed to avoiding a new civil war at all costs - and to bringing back a semblance of democracy in the face of chaos.

 

As the team and its members solidify their purposes and newfound political objectives, Thaddeus finds himself unwittingly drawn into a deadly game where lessons of the past are ignored and special interests manipulate worlds.

 

From a harrowing journey to the Federal North Pole to negotiations with the King of the South, J. T. Riggen provides an action-packed, politically charged set of questions that keeps readers thinking about this new America and its changed values.

 

Independent nations that strive for controlled havoc, CIA efforts to restore peace to a broken nation, and the potentials of a new community and technology that lure Thaddeus away from his isolation all coalesce in a riveting political adventure that will attract readers of survival fiction, political thrillers, dystopian worlds, and solid action stories.

 

The satisfying blend of fast-paced action and strong characterization makes for a fine story that's riveting, realistic, and hard to put down.

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review 2017-11-10 20:47
DECEMBER PARK Review
By Ronald Malfi December Park [Paperback] - Ronald Malfi

In 1993, children in Harting Farms begin to go missing. The police start investigating — and a curfew for kids under eighteen is implemented — but no answers are found. The crimes go on. Five teenage friends band together to solve the crime for themselves, going to places in town adults aren’t aware of, the places kids frequent. Their investigation goes on for quite a while, and in that time they’ll discover more than they expected.

 

This was my second Ronald Malfi novel. Call me a bonafide Malfi fan, because this guy is 2/2 with me. Though this one didn’t quite reach the heights of Bone White, I feel, it was still a lot of fun. It’s a quick, enthralling read, and I would have finished it much sooner had I not also had David Copperfield on the docket.

 

I must admit a few things about this book felt rather derivative. The main character and narrator, Angelo, is a horror-loving kid with a penchant for storytelling. This sort of character has become a trope in horror-tinged coming of age fiction, though it is understandable. It’s a case of writers writing about what they know. Still, it just smacked of unoriginality. Other elements such as a massive storm and a creepy house the kids refer to as “The Werewolf House” felt like they’d been ripped straight from Stephen King’s IT. That’s not to say this is a case of plagiarism; most certainly not. It’s just these things have been done so often before.

 

This is a fun and emotional mystery/thriller starring five very likable (albeit somewhat unmemorable) kids. Whatever problems are present are made up for with Malfi’s sheer writing talent.

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review 2017-11-01 22:30
Rutherford Park - Elizabeth Cooke

 

This is your typical historical fiction novel about family drama caused by secrets. I happen to like books like this so naturally I liked this. It wasn’t the best one I ever read, but it was still good and entertaining for the most part. It took a while for the story to actually get going. What I really liked was how it took place just before World War I broke out. It captured a really interesting time in England and France.

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text 2017-11-01 05:25
Reading progress update: I've read 288 out of 336 pages.
Rutherford Park - Elizabeth Cooke
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text 2017-10-31 03:08
Reading progress update: I've read 177 out of 336 pages.
Rutherford Park - Elizabeth Cooke
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