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text 2017-06-22 22:20
Reading progress update: I've read 70 out of 600 pages.
Moby-Dick in Pictures: One Drawing for Every Page - Matt Kish

What does Melville say?

 

"I don’t know how it is, but people like to be private when they are sleeping."

 

With this and the fitting picture by Matt Kish, I wish you a good night!

 

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review 2017-06-08 12:15
A well-paced mystery that takes us back to a fascinating and tragic historical era
The Lover's Portrait: An Art Mystery - Jennifer S. Alderson

Thanks to Rosie’s Book Review Team and to the author for providing me with an ARC copy of this book that I voluntarily chose to review. (If you are a writer and are interested in getting first-class reviews do check here).

I love art but cannot claim to be a connoisseur and I’ve never been to Amsterdam (well, I stopped at the airport to change planes once but that was that) but I can reassure you neither of those things prevented me from enjoying this solid mystery set within the world of big art museums and exhibitions, with a background story that would comfortably fit into the genre of historical fiction.

The story is written in the third person but from several characters’ point of view, although it is easy to follow and there is no head-hopping as each chapter, some longer and some shorter, is told from only one character’s point of view. There are two time frames. Some chapters are set in 1942 and tell the story of an art dealer from Amsterdam who is being blackmailed by one of the Nazi occupiers due to his homosexuality. In 2015, Zelda, the intrepid protagonist, is trying very hard to get into a Master’s Programme that will qualify her to work in museums and agrees to help with some very basic editing tasks for an exhibition of art objects confiscated by the Nazis that has been organised in an attempt at locating the rightful owners of the paintings. Readers get also a good insight into the thoughts and motivations of other characters (the evil nephew of the original Nazi blackmailer, Rita, the owner of one of the portraits in the exhibition, Huub, the curator of the exhibition…), although we mostly follow Zelda and her adventures. Although this is book 2 in the series, I have not read the first one and had no problem getting into the story. Zelda at times reflects upon how she got here and we learn that she moved from working with computers to a stay in Nepal teaching English and finally Amsterdam. In effect, I felt the novel was better at offering factual information about her than developing her character psychologically. I was not sure of her age but at times she seemed very naïve for somebody who has travelled extensively and has held important jobs, not only with the mystery side of things but also with her personal life, but she has the heart in the right place, and I appreciated the lack of romance in the story.

The different points of view and time changes help keep the suspense going, as we have access to more information than Zelda, but this can sometimes make matters more confusing (as we are not privy to everybody’s thoughts and there are a few red herrings thrown in for good measure). The author is also good at keeping us guessing and suspecting all kinds of double-crossings (perhaps I have been reading too many mystery books and thrillers but I didn’t trust anyone and was on the lookout for more twists than there were).

The setting of Amsterdam, both in the present and in the 1940s is very well depicted and, at least for me, the wish to go there increased as I read. I really enjoyed the description of the process of documentation and how to search for the provenance of artworks (the author explains her own background and its relevance to the subject [very] in an endnote that also offers ample bibliography)  that is sufficiently detailed without getting boring, and the background theme of the fate of art and the persecution of Jews, homosexuals and other minorities in occupied Europe is brought to life in the memories described by several of the characters and also the fictionalised entries of the art merchant. It is not difficult to see how a book about the research of actual works of art could be gripping too, and the fictionalisation and the mystery elements make it attractive to even more readers.

This is a gentle mystery, with no excessive or graphic violence, with an amateur sleuth who sometimes is far too daring and impulsive (although otherwise there would not be much of a story), with a great background and sufficient red herrings and clues to keep the suspense going. I suspect most readers will guess some aspects of the solution, but perhaps not the full details, and even if they do, the rest of the elements of the story make the reading worthwhile.

A good and solid book, an interesting intrigue that combines present and past, set in a wonderful Amsterdam and the art world, with likeable and intriguing characters,  but not heavy on the psychological aspects or too demanding.

 

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review 2017-05-28 13:57
creepy
Pictures of You - Diane M. Dickson

atmospheric and creepy book about a lodger with an obsession.

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text 2017-04-08 07:31
Reading progress update: I've read 134 out of 528 pages.
The Bane Chronicles - Cassandra Clare,Sarah Rees Brennan,Maureen Johnson

I tend to not be too fond of bind ups. Maybe because I feel when I finish one story, it's over & I can close the book and move on to the next (at least, I think that's how my mind see's it), so, I tend to get a bit bored with bind ups fairly quickly. Chances are, I will read this book and eventually pick up another to read when I need a break from this one. Just to have something a little new to read/listen to.

 

As always, when it comes to Cassandra Clare books, I need to have an audio to go with it because many times, her stories are drawn out and, I don't know what it is, there is just something about her books that I just can't seem to stay focused on, although I do like them and her characters. I think it's more her characters than it is the actual stories. Maybe? I don't know.

 

I do like Magnus, but I think my favorite "side character" is Simon. So, I can't wait to get to those novellas/bind up. I read this one first because (1)I just wanted to make sure I got it out the way (2)I wasn't quite sure if there would be spoilers in the Shadowhunters Academy Novellas (I don't think there are, but I wanted to make sure and be on the "safe side") :-)

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