logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: re-read
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-06-01 20:41
Reading progress update: I've read 72%.
Out of Nowhere (Middle of Somewhere Book 2) - Roan Parrish

“You were as much in prison as anyone I knew there, Colin. Only you created it for yourself. Your father paced out the cell and your brothers fit the bars and you turned the key in the lock and buried it somewhere only you know. And you stared at Daniel through the bars and cursed him for being able to walk out the door. But he’s not the one who did something wrong. All he did was save himself. And you can too. But you have to find that key and unlock the door.”

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-06-01 12:23
Reading progress update: I've read 62%.
Out of Nowhere (Middle of Somewhere Book 2) - Roan Parrish

“I’m sorry,” I mutter. “Please don’t hate me. Please.”

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-05-31 16:43
Reading progress update: I've read 50%.
Out of Nowhere (Middle of Somewhere Book 2) - Roan Parrish

“Honestly, I don’t remember asking for the butterfly. I must have, but….” I shrug.

The next morning when I saw it in the mirror, bleary and hungover, I was so confused by what I saw that it took a moment for the lines to coalesce into something recognizable. A fucking butterfly. Something delicate and vulnerable and… gay. It was like I’d been branded with an emblem of everything I wanted to hide.

 

Like Reblog
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-12 00:24
The Line of Polity (Polity: Agent Cormac #2) ★★★★☆
The Line of Polity - Neal Asher

This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot, Booklikes & Librarything by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission
Title: The Line of Polity
Series: Polity: Agent Cormac #2
Author: Neal Asher
Rating: 4 of 5 Stars
Genre: SF
Pages: 676
Format: Scanned Digital Edition





 

 

Synopsis:


A rogue scientist begins working for the Separatists that Cormac had a runin with in the previous book. Skellor, said rogue scientist, has discovered a stash of Jain technology. Jain tech is forbidden by the Polity and as the book goes on, we learn why. Cormac is sent out after Skellor before he can become catastrophically dangerous.

 

At the same time, a rebellion is brewing on the planet Masada. Under the control of rigid belief system that is against A.I. Rule, the theocrats have been in communication with the dragon. With predictable results. The Polity gets involved, the dragon gets pissed off and a lot of people are going to die.

 

When Skellor takes over the Masada system, it appears that things have indeed gone “Catastrophic”. With a whole planet to loot and play with, Skellor has grown into something beyond human and his abilities are just beginning. It is up to Agent Cormac to deal with Skellor, deal with the theocrats and deal with the offspring of the dead dragon: thousands or millions of dracomen.

 

Thankfully, Cormac is a Prime Agent indeed.

 

 



My Thoughts:


I enjoyed this just as much as my previous read in '10. I kept the 4star rating, instead of raising it, because it is evident that Asher is as much a fundamental zealot as I am, but his god is Science and he hates any other belief system. The main difference is that he writes books and interjects that zealotry into his books while I just interject my fundamentalism into small blog posts. So that might not even cross your radar at all.

 

This is what I like about Asher's Polity books. Monstrous inhumanity preying upon everything. In later books we found out how terrifying Jain tech truly is. Whole stellar civilizations destroyed by it. Here we see it gaining a foothold in humanity's playground. It might not be sentient, but it has a Directive. We are also introduced to some alien species, namely, Gabbleducks and Hooders. Gabbleducks roam the surface of Masada eating whatever and babbling words. Hooders eat everything, are impervious to most weaponry and eat their victims alive and by slowly dissecting them with a whole arsenal of claws, blades, etc.

 

Another thing I like about the Polity books is the exploration of the bounds of what it means to be alive. One character who died in the last book comes back as a golem, ie, a recording of the brainwaves put into a near-indestructable metal body. He thinks about what it means for him to have gone from human to golem and how that affects things. Even if I disagree with Asher's conclusions, I am fascinated by the questions and how the questions even come about.

 

In conclusion, I enjoyed this and have no problems recommending this series to anyone looking for a bloody good time. Emphasis on bloody.

 

★★★★☆

 

 

 

  1. Review of Book 1

  2. Previous 2010 Review

     

 

 

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-03-31 17:44
Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey - William Wordsworth  
Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey - William Wordsworth

6 June, 1982

Read for AP English. I rather like Wordsworth, even though I'm not a huge poetry fan.

 

Norton Anthology of English Literature Volume II, which I have kept

***

31 March, 2017

Reread today because it came to my attention. Thirty-five years on, I'm not the same person who read it then. Now I have a daughter in her own senior year of high school. It seems an unbelievable length of time, and yet, hardly any. The math is accurate. But thirty-five years since I graduated high school? And here I am, full circle, worrying about Russia and nuclear war, and the Berlin Wall is now a piece of rubble in that part of the kitchen where strange things show up from time to time. Inconceivable.

I don't share Wordsworth's delight in the countryside in general, although I did find delight in standing outside just now, after the rain, looking for a rainbow. Still I think I get some of what he was trying to say. None of the people who were with me in that last year are near me now, although I suppose I could connect with them all on FaceBook, well, except my parents, who have both died. But I think I get the point he was making about being able to return to a place after whatever changes I've been through, and to feel again the same kinds of sensations. The place I return to isn't a scenic walk in the mountains at the Borders, it's a text, which is the only permanence I know.

There are only two kinds of poetry I care for, still: light verse which amuses and delights Old Possum's Book never gets old to me, nor The Jabberwocky, and poetry like this, that gets at the feelings. I suppose it is the same way I feel about music, that it is an easy and reliable way into a particular emotion.

None of this sheds any light on Wordsworth's poem, and my AP English teacher wouldn't have accepted a paper like this, but this is what reading is for me: a way to share emotions with other people across space and time, or even just with myself. An emotional time machine. I think he'd understand that.

 

Free copy from Project Gutenberg

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?