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review 2017-05-24 05:00
Book Tour: Old Love Dies Hard by Lauren Carr
Old Loves Die Hard - Lauren Carr

Old Love, Die Hard is done well. You get to meet up with Mac’s Ex Wife. The mystery starts once she is in town. There are two murders once Mac takes his ex-wife to this penthouse in Spencer Inn.

 

Did Mac do the murders? Did his ex-wife go and killed her lover? There is not much going on. Who is behind all the murders. We meet or at least learn about his two children. Who would murder Mac two children mother?


Lauren Carr is one talented writer. She brings you along to find out who the killer is. One thing I love about her mysteries is that you never know who the murderer is? I have read a few of her books already and reviewed a few of them. You are welcome to read my reviews that are part of this audio book palooza. My reviews are Cancelled Vows, A Fine Year for Murder, Killer in the Band, The Murders at Astaire Castle, Candidate for Murder, 3 Days to Forever, Kill and Run. We do see what Mac is up to and we also got David O'Callaghan in being the chief of police. Lauren Carr series are all interconnected which is cool. You can read them as stand alone as well.

Source: nrcbooks.blogspot.com/2017/05/book-tour-old-loves-die-hard-by-lauren.html
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review 2017-05-23 20:51
Review: London by Edward Rutherfurd
London; the story of the greatest city on Earth. - Edward Rutherford

This was an intense look at the history of London from ancient druid period to the Blitz of the 1940s as seen through the eyes of a few families. I actually understand the Tudor period and the Restoration period much more now than when I took a class in college on the same topics.

 

The way the book is set up is each chapter being its own short story, making it easier to put down for the night and picking it up again in the morning. I am not used to reading long family sagas, so I had to refer to the family trees in the front of the book a lot; funny, I didn't need the maps of London in the different time periods at all - maybe because I have been to London many times that I knew where about the place was being described. My favorite chapter was The Whorehouse; why wasn't the political and social structure of the whorehouse in medieval times talked about in my college class? I feel a little cheated academically. If a character in the chapter I was currently reading was getting on my nerves, chances were high they weren't in the next chapter (rather it would be their descendants with different character arc). I also liked that I didn't have to read about endless battles; the book focused on political, social, and religious intrigue with splashes of family drama. There was also a healthy dose of Romance, and my favorite couple was Jane Fleming and John Dogget - they didn't get together until they were in their late 50s/early 60s. My least favorite chapter was the last one, titled The River - it was corny and an undisguised way of the author telling the reader how much research went into the book.

 

The men were described with one physical trait that belonged to the family (Duckets and Doggets had a white streak in their hair and webbing between their fingers; the Silversleeves had cartoon-ishly long noses; the Barnikels had vibrant red hair; the Bulls had the typical Anglo-Saxon fair hair and blue eyes). The women were physically described by their family traits and the size of the breasts, but were not objectified (well, maybe the whores) and were shown to be much more smarter and cunning than history often paints them. These were no wall flowers; these women were survivors.

 

I am really glad I took the chance and read this book; the size of the book intimidated me for only a couple of chapters, but I was soon reading 3 chapters a day and making decent progress without feeling like I was slogging through any part. I am going to read Rutherfurd's book New York late this year or next year.

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text 2017-05-23 13:05
Blog Tour: Chance at Redemption by Samatha Harris with Giveaway !

 

Today’s stop is for Samatha Harris’s Chance at Redemption. We will have info about the book and author, plus a great giveaway. Make sure to check everything out and enter the giveaway.

Happy Reading :) 

 


 

 

Gwen Stevens had a privileged life until her father spoke three little words that turned her world upside down. “You’re cut off.”

Broke and desperate, Gwen is forced to accept a waitressing job, but this glimmer of hope has a price. As if being a cocktail waitress isn’t bad enough, she has to do it in a dive bar called The Den, and her bad luck doesn’t stop there. She also needs to deal with the new owner, a blue-eyed, self-righteous ass determined to make her life miserable.

Liam Sinclair walked away from the entitlement and obligation his family planned for him, vowing to make his own way in the world…

Adjusting to life as a new business owner, Liam has experienced more than his fair share of setbacks. When his only waitress breaks her leg, his sister takes it upon herself to hire a replacement—a spoiled, self-indulgent hothead with too much makeup and more than enough attitude. Gwen represents the world he’s trying to escape, a world of excess and greed that he was never cut out for.

Appearances can be deceiving, and first impressions aren’t always right…

Despite their apparent differences, the tension between them turns to a fiery passion that neither of them can resist. Together they find balance and learn to appreciate the simpler things in life. But Gwen soon discovers that old habits die hard, and one mistake is all it takes to ruin everything.

Forgiveness must be earned, but even a villain deserves a chance at redemption…

 

 

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Samatha “Sam” Harris lives near Baltimore, Maryland with her husband David and daughter Ava. Born in Florida, she migrated north which most people agree was a little backwards. She has been an artist all of her life, a Tattoo Artist for more than ten years, and a storyteller since she was a kid. Sam has a slightly unhealthy love for Frank Sinatra, classic movies, and Jazz and Blues music, but her first love will always be reading. From Romance, to Thrillers, to Historical Fiction and everything in between, she loves to become a part of the story. As a writer she tells the stories that she would want to read.

 

Links

 

Website *** Goodreads *** Facebook *** Twitter

 

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

 

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review 2017-05-23 00:27
Apparently playing 'Catch-up' is my new favorite game...
Sunset Park - Santino Hassell

Before I get into this one let me just say these books need to come with a serious 'holy hell, hot sex here' warning.

 

I've been listening to these books over the course of the weekend and it just happens my hubby is home...let me just say I'm now really good with the pause and/or volume buttons. I'm actually listening to 'First and First' at the moment and finally decided it would be best if I broke down and got out the headphones before things get too awkward around here, lol!

 

Don't get me wrong hubby knows what I read/listen to and he doesn't care, but he's not interested in reading and/or listening to every book that I do...thank heavens for earphones or there would be some awkward moments at my house, lol. Good times my friends, good times.

 

Now, back to 'Sunset Park' the second book in Santino Hassell's 'Five Boroughs' series. This is David and Raymond's story. Initially I really wasn't sure how I felt about David given what I knew of him from the first book. Basically David came off as a drinking, cheating, bit of a skank...to say the least he was not impressive. Happily for me by the end of this one my feelings towards David and about the events in the first book definitely mellowed. Do I think that his cheating was acceptable no...never but as is often the case there are two sides to every story and while David was in a bad relationship with Caleb. He definitely compounded the problems with his choices resulting from their problems and that's all on him, but the fact that his relationship with Caleb wasn't good was on both of them. Ok, so let's just leave this at it's complicated and move on to Raymond.

 

While I was intrigued with Raymond by the end of 'Sutphin Boulevard' by the end of this book I liked Raymond a lot and I liked David a lot more than I had anticipated. More importantly I really liked David and Raymond together. They worked, they made each other want to be better people. Yes, they had their disagreements and differences but they worked them out.  There was definite growth on the part of both men and I loved that they were each others biggest defenders.  That the biggest challenge faced by these two men was caused by the disparity in their backgrounds this again went back to a very real challenge faced by many couples today and to the realism of the stories in this series.

 

Michael Ferraiuolo was the narrator for this book and overall I liked his voices. He ticked that basic checklist of mine...every last item. His voices were consistent, conveyed emotions, matched or meshed with my own impressions of the characters, he was consistent. In particular I liked his voices for both David and Raymond (I actually liked Raymond's voice in this book better than the first book).  

 

So needless to say, I'm really looking forward to the remaining two audio books that I have in this series and so far I'm totally into 'First and First' the story is excellent and the narration is superb. I love a series where the books just keep getting better and better!

 

 

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review 2017-05-22 23:07
And yet again, I'm playing catch-up...
Sutphin Boulevard (Five Boroughs Book 1) - Santino Hassell

So here I am finally listening to a series on audio that I'm been dying to read. I loved this story. It's not happy and light or fun and fluffy that's for sure. But what it was...was gripping and painfully told with brutal realism.

 

Michael and Nunzio have been friends for most of their lives and they've had each other's backs and shared pretty much everything their whole lives... everything except maybe how they really feel about each other and maybe, Micheal's growing dependency on alcohol and prescription drugs. As things heat up between them, Michael's dependencies spiral out of control until he wakes up in the hospital with no real memory of how he got there.

 

Michael spends so much time trying to maintain the image that he thinks he should show to the world that he loses sight of who he really is and wants to be. Micheal is so wrapped up in himself that what he misses is how much both his friend Nunzio and his brother Raymond both care about and need him. 

 

For as much as I enjoyed this audio book there were also moments of incredible frustration for me because I've had my own life experiences with people who struggle with addiction so I have to admit sometimes my tolerance and understanding for this isn't what it should or could be but still there were times when my heart ached for Michael and what he was going through while at the same time my frustration was unlimited. It was real life...sometimes we love the person just not who and what they can become.

 

While I definitely had issues as to how I felt about Michael, I very much liked Nunzio. He was a good friend and cared about Michael...not just as a love interest but as a true friend and his interactions with other characters in the story showed him to be a good person...well, maybe with everyone except David but that's another story because Nunzio really did have his reasons for how he felt about David so we'll give him a pass on that. I was also a little intrigued by Raymond, Michael's brother. While I can't necessarily say that I liked him. I was intrigued and there were definite glimpses of a good and caring person. Raymond struck me as some one who had a little growing up to do and just needed to find out what he wanted from life...just a little time to finish growing up.

 

Rusty Topsfield was the narrator for this first installment in Santino Hassell's 'Five Boroughs' series and while his narration was consistent and thankfully ticked my basic list of what works for me with an audio book somehow it just ended up being ok. For whatever reason the voices just weren't quite what my mind was imagining, so not a case of good or bad...just a case of the connection not being there for me when it came to the voices. I'm looking forward to the next book 'Sunset Park' it's a different narrator and I'm curious to see if I connect with his voices better.

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