logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Reading
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
text 2017-03-28 08:32
Talking to a handful of people in the basement of the library

So today I participated in my first author reading.

 

In this group of authors there were six readers including myself. There were two professionals who had traditionally published non-fiction books, three self-published authors including myself, and a young man who performed a slam poem and had a chap book of his work for sale.

 

There was maybe twenty people in the audience mostly (entirely?) made of friends of the authors. I didn't invite any of my friends and none came.

 

I read second. Ten minutes for reading, five for questions.

 

I learned two things.

 

 

- I presented as well or better than any of the other five authors.

 

- You can get your book published by a well respected, traditional publisher and have it short listed for literary awards and you're still talking to a handful of people in the basement of a library.

 

Considering this was my first experience giving a public reading and then sitting behind a table talking to people about my books, I'd say it was pretty much what I expected, and I actually sold some books.

 

If this is the road to becoming a successful author it appears to be a very long and extremely boring journey. It's hard to believe that any time soon I'll be sitting in a fancy ballroom, among the literary and publishing elite about to accept the $50,000 Giller Prize on national television.

 

Never have so many (authors) given so much (hours of toil on their books) for so little (the applause and passing interest of two dozen people).

 

And yet we continue to storm the beaches.

 

 

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-03-28 00:27
What color is your world...
True Colors (True Love) - Anyta Sunday

I'm sure there are probably a dozen stories out there like or similar to this one but sometimes it's not so much the story as how it's told and for me this story was woven through with the colors as much as the words and enriched with characters who added yet another layer of richness to it's brilliant colors. 

 

Marco's mama had colors for her days but for Marco it was people.  He saw colors for the people in his life. Marco's first color was sunglow yellow. He saw a color that was bright and full of happiness and life...full of everything good and right. That was Oskar's color, until Oskar's color became..."Dark, burnt-orange rust. A color to throw away."

 

"True Colors" is told through Marco's eyes as he shares his colors with us and watch his struggle to move on from a past that's filled with heartache and pain. The pain of losing his mother in horrible car crash that left Marco scarred and then the heartache of his best his best friend's betrayal. Marco and Oskar were best friends inseparable until the day that Oskar did the unimaginable and betrayed him. I won't lie, I was pretty damned angry with Oskar and honestly I'm a firm believer in second chances but it took me a while to truly believe that Oskar deserved one.

 

While we are given this background the story actually starts in the present when Oskar returns to Berlin...that's right everyone...this story is set in Germany and I have to say I loved that, it was just a nice little touch of something different. 

 

The journey that Marco and Oskar take to find their way back to each other is filled with anger, frustration, heartache, confusion and love no matter how hard Marco tries to fight it the bond of friendship and love that started when they were boys was never truly broken and texting lots and lots of texting and I loved these conversations.

 

I can't honestly say that I feel like I have adequate words to explain how deeply this story touched me and how much I loved it. It didn't feel so much like being run over by a steamroller as having  a small child tugging gently on your m hand in an effort to get your attention and then when you finally look down you realize that this is what love looks like. It's small and fragile with an underlying strength and resilience that can leave you speechless.

 

And of course for me one of the songs for this one was obvious...

True Colors and Listen to Your Heart

 

******************

An ARC of 'True Colors' was graciously provided by the author via Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-03-27 22:38
I seem to be getting over my age gap issues...
Just Drive - L.A. Witt

and if I'm not well, I need to be since I keep reading books where the MCs have significant age gaps. 

 

It's been quite a while since I've read an L.A. Witt book and I've had this one on my TBR list since it was released so once again I can thank the joys of audiobooks for helping me take a bite out of that pile.

 

Let's start with the audio portion of this review because that's going to be short and sweet. Nick J. Russo was the narrator and as usual he did not fail me. His voices for both Sean and Paul were spot on for me. I loved Paul's deep voice with it's hint of gravel to it and Paul's voice had a bit of a younger tone to it and matched my minds idea of a twenty-somethings voice wonderfully. I love the emotion he instills in these characters. I don't have to try and imagine Paul's anger, frustration, passion, love for Sean or Sean's emotions as these two men struggle to sort things out and figure out how to be together...Mr. Russo gives those emotions in spades with his narration of this story.

 

As for the story...well 4 standing at attention stars...I think it's safe to say that I really liked this story. The age difference was a definite issue for these men. Paul's the CO of the local navel base...Sean's father is the Senior Chief on said navel base...he reports to Paul...Sean's listed as his dependent...there are rules about this...rules that can end careers if news of their relationship gets out.

 

The age difference on this one is a solid 20+ years and I was ok with it because of how it was represented.  It was shown in where these two men were at in their lives. Sean's in college and yes he still lives at home with his father but he's neither immature nor juvenile. He understands how much Paul's career means to him and he tries more than once to walk away for both Paul's sake and his father's. Paul's got two marriages and a few relationships plus a 24 year navel career under his belt. Yes there's a strong sexual relationship here but there's also a strong sense of mutual compatibility, shared interest and two people who just like each other. As well as a growing romantic relationship there's a bond of friendship and mutual respect developing between Paul and Sean.

 

The fact that the author didn't do the typical stereo-typing of making the older MC always be the voice of reason and the dominant sexual partner was definitely a refreshing take on this May/December romance as well.

 

Sean's relationship with his father was another aspect of this story that added more depth and believe-ability to things. Sean loved his dad and while he loved and respected his father, he also resented the impact that his father's career has had on his life. While his father loves him, they still find themselves at odds over things and they talk. Maybe things aren't always resolved instantly but again the love and mutual respect is evident. I really enjoy stories that give us real parents, not perfect just normal everyday people who love their kids and want to try and do what's best for them.

 

'Just Drive' is a wonderfully balanced story that easily felt like it could have happened at some navel base somewhere. But more than anything it was the ending of this story that tugged at my heartstrings. While our men may have gotten their happily ever after it was earned when changing priorities can only be achieved with compromise and sacrifice from everyone involved. 

 

'Just Drive' was a story that worked 'just right' from start to finish.

 

*****************

An Audiobook of 'Just Drive' was graciously provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

 

Like Reblog Comment
text 2017-03-27 22:06
Thank You, Mr. Falker - Patricia Polacco

Patricia Polacco's book, Thank you, Mr. Falker, holds a very special place in my heart as a future teacher. The book is based off of true events that took place in the life of Polacco, herself, growing up. It addresses criticial issues seen in schools across the world, such as bullying or reading difficulties. Trisha, the central character of the story, craves the sweet knowledge of how to read, but she is different than most students. She suffers major difficulties in reading and begins to fall behind all of the other students. About midways through the book, she loses both of her grandparents, who were her biggest supporters in the work. The other students also begin to pick on her, calling her dumb for not knowing how to read. When her grandparents pass away, her family decides to move. For Trisha, she hopes this will give her a new opportunity to not be bullied; however, things are much worse at her new school. A boy in her class, Eric, is relentless about degrading her in class. It's not until the school gets a new teacher, Mr. Falker, that Trisha is able to see hope in the future of her reading. This book covers a diverse amount of topics that should be addressed within the classroom. Its lexile reading level is AD650L, and it can be read by most students who are ages six through nine. Honestly, I feel as though this book should also be read in the middle and high school setting. This presents a way for teachers to talk about bullying within the school and in the classrooms. Aside from bullying, this book allows the teacher to talk openly about how all students are different when it comes to reading. Some students can be considered advanced readers, and others are considered struggling readers. The teacher can highlight this very aspect by simply reading about the classrooms that Trisha was in throughout the story. The teacher could also use this book to talk about how some students can suffer loss within their families. Students could have a death in their family, or maybe they are having to move schools and make changes. This book is full of endless opportunities to talk about these issues within the classroom. In my classroom, I would definitely want to use this book to address bullying. I would read the book with my class, and then students could organize either group skits or maybe even a class skit to show the implications of bullying in school.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-03-27 16:50
Reading progress update: I've read 1%.
Carry the Ocean - Heidi Cullinan

Time for another reread of my all-time favorite book.

 

 

 

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?