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review 2018-07-17 00:19
Macarons at Midnight (Just Desserts, #1) by M.J. O'Shea and Anna Martin Review
Macarons at Midnight - M.J. O'Shea,Anna Martin

Tristan Green left his small English town for Manhattan and a job at a high profile ad agency, but can’t seem to find his bearings. He spends a lot of time working late at night, eating and sleeping alone, and even more time meandering around his neighborhood staring into the darkened windows of shops. One night when he’s feeling really low, he wanders by a beautiful little bakery with the lights still on. The baker invites him in, and some time during that night Tristan realizes it’s the first time he’s really smiled in months.

Henry Livingston has always been the odd duck, the black sheep, the baker in an old money family where pedigree is everything and quirky personalities are hidden behind dry martinis and thick upper east side townhouse facades. Henry is drawn to Tristan’s easy country charm, dry English wit, and everything that is so different from Henry’s world.

Their new romance is all buttercream frosting and sugared violets until Tristan's need to fit in at work makes him do something he desperately wishes he could undo. Tristan has to prove to Henry that he can be trusted again before they can indulge in the sweet stuff they're both craving.

 

Review

 

The baking in this romance was amazing and comes with recipes. 

The book also showcases New York City. 

The love story between Tristen is sweet and tender. The loneliness Tristen feels so far from England and Henry's choice to not be part of the New York elite is nicely detailed.

Because the connection between the heroes charms, the conflicts in the book between Tristen and his awful work environment and then the over reaction of Henry of something that happens feels too heavy handed and made me want to skip around and took away from the pleasure of the book.

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review 2018-07-16 20:02
Love Has No Expiration by C.S. Poe Review
Love Has No Expiration - C.S. Poe

There's more to life than work, and love has no expiration, even for those approaching their forty-fifth birthday.

Daniel Richards is a private chef in New York City who has committed over a decade to his skills and passion. He has carved out a name for himself in the industry and has bookings for parties and dinners months in advance. Now that he's in his midforties, however, he's come to the realization that he's lonely and desperate for companionship. Two days before Valentine's Day, he meets Keith Maxwell at a farmer's market and can't keep the much younger man out of his thoughts. Keith is eager and willing to take a chance with someone older, but Daniel's reluctance stops Keith's every attempt. Worried his career will suffer if he dedicates time to a serious romance, or that Keith won't be satisfied with someone so much older, Daniel nearly thwarts his own attempts at finding happiness.

 

Review

 

I like C.S. Poe's writing a great deal and this is a lovely age difference romance which starts at a Farmer's Market.

This love story between Keith and Daniel explores adjusting one's life to make room for love. 

Well written.

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review 2018-07-16 19:36
Giveaway & Review for Stolen Obsession by Marlene M Bell @ewephoric
Stolen Obsession (Annalisse Series Book 1) - Marlene M. Bell

 


On Tour with Prism Book Tours

 

Stolen Obsession
(Annalisse Series #1)
By Marlene M. Bell
Contemporary Romantic Suspense
Paperback & ebook, 294 Pages
June 30th 2018 by Ewephoric Publishing

 

MY REVIEW

 

The fabulous cover hints at the story inside and I do like when that happens. Doesn’t it peak your curiosity?

 

Annaliise has lost one friend to the curse and she struggles to stop any more from being added to the tragedy. She’s determined to protect her friends, whether they believe in the curse or not.

 

I love any twist on murder in my mystery and suspense/thriller reading, and Marlene M Bell supplies that in Stolen Obsession.

 

Traveling through words are some of my favorite adventures. I go places I would never visit otherwise. So…are you ready for the journey?

 

Annalise fights her attraction to Alex, but he is persistent and patient in his wooing of her, offering to help her on her mission to solve the mystery of the jewels. Annalise had suffered a great loss and protected her heart from more hurt. Of course, we know that can’t stand forever, seeing this is romantic suspense, but he will have to earn his way in.

 

I can relate to him, because my Mr Wonderful was the same way. And we know how that ended.

 

 

Their relationship developed in a realistic fashion, no instalove, but a familiar face appears in a new light for her. I won’t explain any more. You will need to read Stolen Obsession to find out more.

I couldn’t help but crack up at the Art Lady. She carries Ms Smith, her trusty 38, because pepper spray doesn’t cut it for her and is only used for backup.

Numerous times Marlene M Bell takes me to the brink of suspenseful tragedy, only to keep them safe and let me know there is more danger to come. I am very suspicious and she leads me to the edge of a cliff. I feel I’ll fall off, but she yanks me back from the precipice saying…not yet…but soon. I love that!!!

I voluntarily reviewed a free copy of Stolen Obsession by Marlene M Bell.

Animated Animals. Pictures, Images and Photos  4 Stars

 

READ MORE HERE

 

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Source: www.fundinmental.com/giveaway-review-for-stolen-obsession-by-marlene-m-bell-ewephoric-ewephoric
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review 2018-07-16 19:02
Review: “Boystown 6: From the Ashes” (Boystown Mysteries, #6) by Marshall Thornton
Boystown 6: From the Ashes - Marshall Thornton

 

~ 4 stars ~

 

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review 2018-07-16 18:54
A light, feel-good read, for those who enjoy choral books full of larger-than-life characters.
The Not So Perfect Plan to Save Friendship House - Michelle Gorman

I write this review as a member of Rosie’s Book Review Team and thank Rosie Amber (check here if you would like to have your book reviewed) and the author for providing me an ARC copy of this novel, which I freely chose to review.

Sometimes it seems as if all the books and movies on offer are centred on young protagonists, and I’m not only talking about Young Adult books. However, recently there has been a move towards including older protagonists and subjects. I enjoyed the two Dutch books about Hendrik Groen, a man in his eighties living in a nursing home, and have watched a few movies, usually choral, about older protagonists (like The Exotic Marigold Hotel). The setting of this novel, in a residential home, and the promise of a comedy made it sound like the perfect choice for me.

The first-person narrator of the story is Phoebe, a chef who had a very successful career in a bistro before disaster struck. She loves her job at the residential home (The Jane Austen Home for Ladies, and, as we discover, the name is meaningful in several ways), but has always felt frustrated because her parents (and her mother, in particular) do not seem to value her job and are dismissive of her career. To make matters worse, her mother (a larger-than-life character) dies suddenly at the beginning of the book, but her internalised voice keeps gnawing on her confidence.  Her best friend, June, is the manager of the home, and she fancies Nick, who is the official physiotherapist but also takes on any odd jobs going on (art therapy, gardening, handyman…). I know some readers don’t like first-person narratives, although Phoebe is unassuming, witty and an excellent friend. (On the minus side, her lack of self-confidence can make her sound paranoid and bitchy, and she keeps mulling over things, unable to decide what to do, trying hard to feel comfortable in her own skin and accept the credit for her achievements). We learn some surprising things about her family life together and by the end of the book, although I don’t have much in common with her character, I felt connected to her and appreciated her role as a narrator. Her friendship with June is convincing and their relationship is one of the strongest points of the book.

I also loved the residents of the home, and in many ways (not only due to my age, I hope), I felt closer to them than to the protagonist. We get to know some of them more than others (Maggie is fabulous and I loved Dot, Laney, Sophie, and yes, even Terence). They all feel real, with their foibles and their endearing traits, and make the book memorable. We follow the intrigues that have to do with the home and the changes that take place there (from a women’s only place to a mixed one) and learn about its inhabitants, their secrets, and their past lives. We are both observers and participants in much of the action, and we feel invested in their fates. We learn the importance of accepting people for who they are and moving beyond appearances and prejudices.

There are several romances with happy, or at least hopeful, endings (for the young and the older generations), broken hearts and disappointments, secrets and lies, and there is also the connection (pointed out through references to the book club and their discussions) to Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. I would not call the novel a variation on Pride and Prejudice but if we think of Austen’s text as we read it we can discover nuances that might be easily missed otherwise.

Although there are many amusing lines in the novel (and some pretty touching ones as well. As we know, humour can be an excellent defence mechanism against hurt), I thought I’d share a few (remember that I got an ARC copy, so there might be some changes to the final version of the novel):

We’ve never let something as trifling as the spectre of death stand in the way of a good snipe.

My mother didn’t get ulcers, she gave them.

He’s a perv-whisperer.

She wouldn’t like my ponytail, though. I did try taking it down, but having it up in a hair tie the entire weekend meant my hair had a ridge along the back that gave it a very White Cliffs of Dover effect.

I’m surprised he doesn’t need an oxygen tank with all the social climbing he’s been doing.

The writing flows well and fits in perfectly with the voice of the narrator, who can spend inordinate amounts of time thinking about her beau but is also attuned to the feelings of the residents and her friend. There are plenty of amusing events taking place throughout the novel that keep the action moving, but the characters are much stronger than the plot and by the end of the book (that I enjoyed) they have all become good friends (or most of them have).

The author defines her books as light reads, as beach novels, and says her readers describe them as “feel-good.” All that is true, although behind all the funny goings-on the book illustrates the importance of keeping expectations and prejudices under control, and it reminds parents that they should encourage their children to find fulfilment in their own terms rather than expect them to make their parent’s dreams come true.  If you are looking for a light read, full of memorable characters, plenty of humour, and a big deal of heart, I’d recommend this novel. And, if it existed in real life, I wouldn’t mind working at the home (and in time even living there) either.

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