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review 2017-07-30 21:15
40 Days of Healing Journal
40 Days of Healing Journal - Danyelle Scroggins

Title:  40 Days of Healing Journal

Author:  Danyelle Scroggins

Publisher:  Create Space Independent Publishing

Reviewed By:  Arlena Dean

Rating: Five

Review:

 

"40 Days of Healing Journal"  by Danyelle Scroggins

 

My Thoughts....

 

This was definite a clearly well thought out journal about fasting....& praying with wonderful scriptures.

 

Here is the starting of how this journal is presented to the reader which is very easy to follow.

 

"It is about laying aside that thing or those things that obstruct you from being the best person you can be, and believing the denying of yourself, gives God room to maximize your potential at becoming the best you, or opening channels for your to receive answered prayers."

 

"For the next forty days...you are to commit to giving ups something like...Soda, Sweets, Lying, Facebook, Social Media, The Telephone, Cell Phone, Gambling, Alcohol, Gossiping, Sex, Wine, Television, Something but faithfully for the next 40 days!"


I can definitely pick one or more of these!

 

Write the one what you are giving up....

I'm Giving up....

Why I chose to give up this is...because....

 

Day 1 Psalm 95:7-8

 

During this time of fasting and prayer we are to remember to meditate each day to hear the voice of God.

Don't let anyone turn you from the fact you have picked up this book!

 

'Set your mind to wind because whatever the 'it' is in your life that is keeping you from your next level, 'it' must go down, so you can get up!

 

Your prayer for today:

 

What has God spoken for you to do but because your heart is hard, you can't seem to find a way through to do?

 

After the 40 days are up, what would you desire to have gained?

 

This was day one...now to work through 39 more days....

 

My Declaration:

My 'It' Has to Go In Jesus' Name

 

Day 2  Matthew 4: 17

 

And this goes on through to Day 40 with each day receiving a word from the author as she leaves  a word for you...

 

"There's no excuse for turning back after  39 days ago.  Move Forward with this new mindset and a will to work the Word in your life, because baby, if you Work the word the Word will Work for you,"

The Aftermath   Isaiah 41:9-11

Our Faith   Galatians 3:6-9

The End... "Is never complete until God says so!"

 

After I went through this journal  I found it well written and giving one so much important divine inspirational information that will only help 'renew ones total mind, body and spirit.'  I loved how after each day,  one is to write their prayers.  Wow, what one can get through fasting and prayers!

 

This journey was beautifully well done and anyone can follow along each of the 40 days  and be truly blessed. Would I recommend?  Definitely yes!  I plan on starting my 40 days soon.

 

Thank you to the author for permitting me to read about your journal... "40 Days of Healing Journal."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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review 2017-07-26 18:01
The Woman's Dictionary of Symbols and Sacred Objects - Barbara G. Walker

A wonderful work on the study of symbols and sacred objects as they relate to the female. It's an excellent companion to the marvelous "The Book Of Symbols: Reflections On Archetypal Images" offering insight on the feminine roots of many of our symbols.

 

Just as an example, one such symbol is the fish, widely accepted to be the symbol of Christianity, but which is actually FAR older. Ichthys was the offspring of the ancient Sea goddess Atargatis, and was known in various mythic systems as Tirgata, Aphrodite, Pelagia, or Delphine. The word also meant "womb" and "dolphin" in some tongues, and representations of this appeared in the depiction of mermaids. The fish is also a central element in other stories, including the Goddess of Ephesus, as well as the tale of the fish of the Nile that swallowed part of Osiris' body (the penis), and was also considered a symbol of the sexuality of Isis for she had sexual intercourse with Osiris after his death which resulted in the conception and birth of his posthumous son, Harpocrates, Horus-the-child. So, in pagan beliefs, the fish is a symbol of birth and fertility.

 

Before Christianity adopted the fish symbol, it was known by pagans as "the Great Mother", and "womb". Its link to fertility, birth, and the natural force of women was acknowledged also by the Celts, as well as pagan cultures throughout northern Europe.

The Romans called the goddess of sexual fertility by the name of Venus. And thus it is from the name of the goddess Venus that our modern words "venereal" and "venereal disease" have come. Friday was regarded as her sacred day, because it was believed that the planet Venus ruled the first hour of Friday and thus it was called dies Veneris. And to make the significance complete, the fish was also regarded as being sacred to her. The similarities between the two, would indicate that Venus and Freya were originally one and the same goddess and that original being the mother-goddess of Babylon.

 

The same association of the mother goddess with the fish-fertility symbol is evidenced among the symbols of the goddess in other forms also. The fish was regarded as sacred to Ashtoreth, the name under which the Israelites worshiped the pagan goddess. And in ancient Egypt, Isis is represented with a fish on her head.

Great stuff. Wonderful for those of us who do dream work, and who look for the deep plumb line of the Sacred that runs through all time, all people, and all place. More evidence the world is full of wonder, magic, and miracle.

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review 2017-07-17 18:35
Reservation Blues, by Sherman Alexie
Reservation Blues - Sherman Alexie

This is my first Alexie and not my last. I'm struggling with what to say about it and how because somehow this not-huge novel feels like it's packed in everything about Indian (as they refer to themselves) culture with its focus on a particular reservation and a rock band's steep rise and fall. It does so with deadpan humor and a mix of the fantastic and real that calls to mind magical realism but is distinctive. It's necessarily sad yet not depressing--there's the humor, and there's wonder and hope. There's not an insignificant or uncharismatic character in the book. I feel like I've taken a long, strange trip with them and wish them well.

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review 2017-07-12 15:02
The Book of Dahlia, by Elisa Albert
The Book of Dahlia - Elisa Albert

Dahlia Finger is kind of an asshole. She's 29 and spends her days sprawled out on her couch, smoking weed and watching movies, funded by her well-off father. One night she has a seizure and learns that she has a brain tumor. Though no one will actually say it, she doesn't have long to live.

 

This is not one of those novels of illness where there's redemption ahead or that's supposed to make you hopeful and grateful for life (beyond not having a brain tumor). For that reason, I appreciated and responded to it. Unlike all the books on cancer Dahlia and her parents buy in bulk that say "you can beat this thing" if only you have the right attitude, in effect making you responsible (and to blame) for your own illness, The Book of Dahlia illustrates how we as a culture fail to deal with mortality. Though it's not addressed specifically in the novel, I personally wonder how much that American idea of pulling oneself up by the bootstraps is at play, which easily translates into victim-blaming when one can't.

 

One of the platitudes often given regarding illness and healing is that a sufferer must let go of old resentments and anger, that these can make or keep one sick. As Dahlia considers and recounts her past, it's clear she has almost nothing but resentments, from a mother who essentially abandoned her family to the older brother, once close, who took out his own pain on her in the cruelest ways. Throughout her life she's plainly asked for help and been ignored. Maybe it says something about me that I couldn't blame her for her stubbornness in forgiving and forgetting. It feels like the only way she's able to have any agency during her illness.

 

If this sounds grim, it's not, or not only! Dahlia's voice is often funny, enough to make me laugh out loud while reading. Her humor may be bitter, but that suits me fine. At the end of the book there was a reading group guide that asked more than one question about whether one is able to sympathize with her; I absolutely could. I often like female characters in popular culture that others find abrasive, though I often wonder how much it's about gender.

 

The toughest and most affecting aspect of this book was the relationship between Dahlia and her older brother. As a younger sister myself, I'm always interested in and more sensitive to depictions of that dynamic. It broke my heart to read about the turn their relationship takes, how long Dahlia holds out and has faith in him, even insulting herself to get ahead of his insulting her. I both wanted and did not want Dahlia to forgive him. It made me want to call my own brother and thank him for not being a dick!

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url 2017-07-02 10:25
Spirituality and Historical Fiction Ama: Interview with Author Nataša Pantović Nuit
A-Ma Alchemy of Love - Nataša Pantović Nuit

Honored to be interviewed by Wayne Turmel (Author of The Count of the Sahara)! Just published on his excellent Website... Spirituality and Historical Fiction, an interview journey into A-Ma Alchemy of Love...

Source: wayneturmel.com/2017/07/spirituality-and-historical-fiction-with-natasa-pantovic-nuit
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