logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: the-name-of-the-wind
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-16 17:02
Wishes in the Wind by Andrea Kane
Wishes in the Wind - Andrea Kane

Someone is threatening her father's life, because the renowned jockey wouldn't throw a race, so Nicole Aldridge, willing to do anything to save her father's life, masquerades as a boy in order to seek employ with the Marquis of Tyrenham.

Little does she know, Dustin Kingsley would recognize her for the woman who's stolen his heart during a short conversation on the bank of the Thames and that the aristocrat will do anything to keep her father and her safe.


Unfortunately, this doesn't hold a candle to its predecessor. Not in characterization, romance (if you want to call it that), nor suspense.

The characters were unfortunately mere sketches, not truly developed beyond the initial story needs, the romance was rushed, hasty, and too instantaneous to be plausible, even less believable, and while the suspense could've been the saving grace of this novel, it was pushed into the background, playing second fiddle to the "romance". There was no real intrigue or intensity, and no real feel of peril.

I feel Dustin deserved more.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-15 16:24
My Old Clock I Wind and Other Poems - William Morris

 

A book of poetry by K. Morris. The poems explore different themes, lamenting the passing years, questioning what is called "progress" among others, but there are some nonsensical funny ones too. 
One poem that I liked:

The Seasons

Leaves swish like water
As I walk through
Them to reach the park. 'Tis true
Autumn is still here.
Yet, I fear winter will give no quarter;
For each season does murder its daughter
Who dies not, but rather sleeps
And creeps
Forth to softly kill
Her father who will
Rise once more.

As it was before
So it will remain. The perpetual cycle
Of the seasons, a vital order does bring
Spring
Follows winter stern
Buds return
And soon,
Come summer, flowers will bloom.

Autumn imperceptibly doth replace
Summer's flushed face.
While the fall's slow decay
Whispers, "Winter is on his way."

And another:

Midnight Rose

No light, garish and red
Only night's dead
hour
And the flower
Whose bloom
Was gone too soon.

The moon
Shone on
The rose picked
And stripped
By the wind that trifles,
Rifles,
And is gone. 

I received this book from the author in exchange for an honest review-- thank you.
 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
photo 2018-04-14 13:19
Spring!

Spring has finally come! And with it spring winds, as you can see when you look at my hair (if you dare!) ;)

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-28 18:05
A Wind in the Door (Time Quintet, #2) by Madeleine L'Engle
A Wind in the Door - Madeleine L'Engle

After reading A Wrinkle in Time and discovering the interesting concepts of that world, I've decided to continue reading Madeleine L'Engle's Time Quintet series. I picked up A Wind in the Door shortly after finishing the first book and basically got more of the same. Great story concepts; poorly written characters and bad morals. But the morals in this book were a bit too horrible to ignore this time. 

 

A Wind in the Door continues to follow Meg and Charles Wallace in this world with time and space bending and obscuring our current world. I love L'Engle's ideas of how there are many things in this universe that doesn't make sense and it doesn't have to when you have to focus on the bigger picture. In this case, helping cure Charles Wallace of an unknown disease. I really love that this book explored the mitochondria we have within us. I have a fascination with learning about it since I've read and played Parasite Eve a few years back now. So reading this book brought me a lot of nostalgia. Reading these books are fun for me because, as I've said before, I love L'Engle's ideas when it comes to sci-fi and fantasy. What I don't love about her writing is how basic it is and her characters just rub me the wrong way.

 

Meg is still so bloody insufferable. She's a high schooler but she acts like a toddler in many situations. For example, at the beginning of the book, when they are all discovering Charles Wallace was ill, she kept asking her mother what was his condition. The mother would answer she didn't know... only to have Meg ask the same question immediately having been told her mother didn't know only to ask the same question AGAIN only to be told AGAIN her mother didn't know. And that would continue constantly throughout the whole book. It's like, Meg, please, grow up. Just because you ask the same question a billion times doesn't mean the answer is going to change at any point. I really don't like Meg as a character. She has not shown growth at all throughout these two books. In fact, a lot of L'Engle's characters are just one note. They each have a gimmick and they stick to that without growing or changing a bit. Meg is the annoying worry wort. Charles Wallace is the calm, all-knowing "Jesus" character. Mr. Jenkins is the mean, old teacher. And Calvin is the stud/jock. Reading about these characters can get boring after a while.

 

Another thing I do not like about this book was the overall "message." L'Engle seems to be teaching children that it's okay to be themselves... as long as you can fit into society. Throughout the entire book, she kept making her characters say to Charles Wallace that he needs to "conform" so that way he won't have a hard time in school. Let me back track a little, Charles Wallace is being bullied at school for being "different." He's beaten everyday and comes home from school with blackeyes and a bloody nose everyday. And everyone (except Meg) just tells him it's basically his fault for being so different. He needs to learn to "conform" and "be normal" like everyone else. That way, he won't be picked on. Well, I'm sorry, but I think that's a bunch of bullshit. How is it okay to know that a small, six-year-old boy is being beaten at school, and your response is "Well, if you weren't so different, you wouldn't get punched in the face"? Even his parents didn't do anything to help their child! Are you kidding me? Then by the end of the book, L'Engle drives it home even harder that children need to learn to "adapt" so they can succeed in the world. Yeah, no, how about being better adults, teaching kids to get along with others who are "different" so that way crap like bullying doesn't happen every bloody time? It makes me angry when adults see this kind of behavior happening and they do nothing about it. NOTHING! Ugh. I'm frustrated.

 

And don't even get me started on the contradictions when it comes to Mr. Jenkins. How everyone needed to protect his ego when he felt he wasn't unique anymore. You can do that for a grown man but not Charles Wallace? You tell him that there's no one else like him in the world, but you tell a six-year-old he needs to be like everyone else if he wants to be happy and not picked on? Really? No. I just. I can't. I just can't support the hypocrisy. There is nothing in this world that makes it okay for you to tell another person they can't be themselves. Or rather, they could, as long as they fit in with everyone else. That's messed up on so many levels.

 

Anyway, I'm going to end it here. Once again, I'm left with the feeling that Madeleine L'Engle has some great concepts when it comes to sci-fi and fantasy. I just wish she would focus on them more than trying to teach "life lessons" to children. I feel like these books would be a lot more enjoyable if that were the case.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-18 19:27
#Audiobook Review: A Wind in the Door by Madeleine L'Engle
A Wind in the Door - Listening Library,Jennifer Ehle,Madeleine L'Engle

A Wind in the Door is the follow up story to one of my favorite books, A Wrinkle in Time. Moving forward in time a couple years, we catch up with Meg, Calvin, and Charles Wallace as they take on another cosmic adventure. This time around, Charles Wallace is very ill, and Meg and Calvin meet new beings who help them try to save him.

 

Once again, I listened to the book with my 11-year old daughter (after reading it several times in my youth and as an adult). We both found the story somewhat interesting, but not nearly as good as the first book. I felt the story tries too hard to get across its messages of "everything is connected" and "love everyone." The concepts used became increasingly repetitive and unnecessarily confusing. We both became bored with the Meg's tests, meanwhile, we both were able to figure out and solve Meg's problems well before she did.

 

Ms. Ehle does a good job with her narration, although I did enjoy Ms. Davis's performance in A Wrinkle in Time a bit more. At first, it was hard not to compare the two performances, but after a while, I could appreciate Ms. Ehle's work on its own merit. She has a calming presence and captures the exuberant nature of Meg.

 

In the end, I enjoyed the experience of listening to A Wind in the Door with my daughter, but we both agree the book had a few issues.

 

My rating: B-/C+
My daughter: 3.4 stars

 

Narration: B
My daughter: 4 stars

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?